School/Class News






Dallas ISD and North Lake College now recruiting rising ninth-graders for new collegiate program

The new North Lake Collegiate Academy is opening in August as a joint effort of Dallas County Community College District and Dallas ISD. The new program—open to students anywhere in Dallas County— will put a tuition-free high school diploma and college degree within reach of more area students at a substantial financial savings to their families.

The new academy will offer courses and career pathways in public service, criminal justice and business administration. Rising ninth-graders have until Jan. 31 to apply at www.dallasisd.org/yourchoices.  Parents and students can obtain details at an information sessions planned for 6 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 24, at North Lake College, 1081 W. Shady Grove Rd. in Irving.

North Lake College President Christa Slejko welcomes the new program. “This is a wonderful opportunity for more high school students to earn a high school diploma and an associate degree at the same time,” she said. “The collegiate academy is a great option for students within our community, and we look forward to welcoming these new Blazers to our North Lake family this fall.”

Dallas ISD Principal Chase McLaurin, who will serve as administrator of the new program, says attending high school on a college campus is a major attraction for students who will in one sense be able to jump directly from middle school to college.

“I think the location is important for students,” he said. “Being on a college campus helps students realize that their dreams of going to college are real, possible, and coming true. This is a game changer for students and opens up a whole new world of opportunities.”

The tuition-free opportunity offers families the potential to save up to $40,000 in college tuition. Students also earn credit, hands-on experience and mentoring from industry partners in a variety of career pathways.

Since their inception in 2016, Dallas ISD’s collegiate academies have become a niche for highly motivated students whose families recognize the value of their student graduating with both a high school diploma and up to 60 hours of college credit or an associate degree at no personal cost to their families. The schools are a partnership of Dallas ISD and the Dallas County Community College District, which share faculty and curriculum and allow juniors and seniors to take classes on a college campus.


Fourth-grader Jasira King wins top prize in MLK Jr. Oratory finals






The winner of the 27th annual Dallas Martin Luther King Jr. Oratory Competition is Jasira King, a fourth-grader at William Brown Miller Elementary School.

The second-place finisher is Tory Robertson Jr. of Clara Oliver Elementary School; third place went to Tynia Matts, a fifth-grader at John Neely Bryan Elementary School.

Competitors write, memorize and deliver the speeches based on the theme. This year, students were asked to provide their takes on “What would Dr. Martin Luther King say to the children of today’s world?”

Campus winners from the 16 participating schools advanced to the semifinals, which were conducted in December. The top eight in that round advanced to the finals. The remaining five finalists are:

• Kaiya Hudson, fifth grade, Charles Rice Learning Center
• Layla James, fifth grade, Ronald E. McNair Elementary
• Presley Rivers, fifth grade, Harry C. Withers Elementary
• Kimberli Rouwtt, fourth grade, J.P. Starks Math, Science and Technology Vanguard
• Alexandra Torres, fifth grade, Wilmer-Hutchins Elementary

The event is sponsored by law firm Foley Gardere.


Collegiate Academy grads save $120K in college tuition

It’s a rare family that can boast of saving more than $100,000 in college tuition. One family that can definitely make that claim are the Edwards of Oak Cliff whose triplets—Michael, Morgan and Moriah graduated with their high school diplomas and tuition-free associate degrees from the Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy in 2014.

Like all Dallas ISD collegiate academies/early college high schools, Gilliam offered the Edwards triplets the opportunity to realize a savings of $40,000 each in college tuition. That’s the estimated cost of two years of tuition at a four-year college or university.

The savings were just part of the motivation for choosing Gilliam, said one of the triplets, Michael Edwards. “I had my heart set on attending Jesuit or St. Marks after high school, but our mom made the call when she received a letter announcing that all three of us were accepted at Gilliam.”

Looking back, Michael said it was the best possible decision. “It speeded up the process of receiving our bachelor’s degrees,” he said referencing his B.A. in Mass Communications/Political Science, his sister Morgan’s B.S. in Human Performance and sister Moriah’s pending pre-med degree—all earned at Prairie View A&M University.

Today, all three are forging ahead—Michael is pursuing a master of liberal studies at SMU; Morgan is studying at UT Arlington working on a master’s in athletic training, and Moriah is on track to graduate with her pre-med degree this spring.

Morgan describes the collegiate academy experience as a major confidence boost. “It helped me decide to just go for it. I’ve realized that I will never allow circumstances to get in my way. I’m doing a lot now that other 20-year-olds will need years to accomplish.”

The triplets’ mom, Monique Morgan Edwards, is beyond proud of her children’s accomplishments and grateful for both the tuition savings and the support of the Gilliam staff. “From the custodian and cafeteria lady to the principal, everyone there was part of the village” that she credits for enriching her children’s lives.


Four schools advance to UIL State Debate Competitions

Four Dallas ISD schools advanced to the UIL State CX Debate Tournament by placing first and second at the UIL District Meet in their respective divisions. James Madison, Wilmer-Hutchins, Bryan Adams high school and the School for Talented and Gifted will compete in the 2019 CX Debate State Tournament at the University of Texas at Austin in March.

The winning teams are:

Conference 3A District 11
Madison High School

  • Julia Ford and Coriesha Lowe, First Place
  • LaDarious Crayton and Zarious Morgan, Second Place

Conference 4A District 12
Wilmer Hutchins High School

  • Tiana Dean and Jailyn Woods McCarthy, First Place
  • Ryesha Gabriel and Téona Grant, Second Place

Conference 5A District 12
Bryan Adams High School

  • Gloria Alvarez and Sana Hassan, First Place
  • Alondra Camacho and Elijah Guerra, Second Place

Conference 6A District 8
School for the Talented & Gifted

  • Hector Hernandez and Christian Mendoza, First Place
  • Zoe Osborn and Miles Scholten, Second Place

Four schools advance to UIL State Debate Competitions

Four Dallas ISD schools advanced to the UIL State CX Debate Tournament by placing first and second at the UIL District Meet in their respective divisions. James Madison, Wilmer-Hutchins, Bryan Adams high school and the School for Talented and Gifted will compete in the 2019 CX Debate State Tournament at the University of Texas at Austin in March.

The winning teams are:

Conference 3A District 11
Madison High School

  • Julia Ford and Coriesha Lowe, First Place
  • LaDarious Crayton and Zarious Morgan, Second Place

Conference 4A District 12
Wilmer Hutchins High School

  • Tiana Dean and Jailyn Woods McCarthy, First Place
  • Ryesha Gabriel and Téona Grant, Second Place

Conference 5A District 12
Bryan Adams High School

  • Gloria Alvarez and Sana Hassan, First Place
  • Alondra Camacho and Elijah Guerra, Second Place

Conference 6A District 8
School for the Talented & Gifted

  • Hector Hernandez and Christian Mendoza, First Place
  • Zoe Osborn and Miles Scholten, Second Place

Dallas ISD da a conocer a maestros del año para el ciclo 2018-2019

Dos de los 10 finalistas  anunciados con anterioridad recibieron la distinción de Maestro del Año de Dallas ISD para el año escolar 2018-2019.

Elisa Morrissey, de Alex W. Sanger Elementary School, fue elegida como maestra del año en la categoría de primarias, y Nadirah Shakir, de J. L. Long Middle School, en la categoría de secundarias.

Stephen Butt, presidente de la división Central Market de H-E-B, presentó a Morrissey y Shakir cheques de $5,000 durante una recepción que se realizó el miércoles, 16 de enero, para reconocer a los finalistas. El superintendente Michael Hinojosa y los representantes de la Junta Escolar agradecieron a los maestros por su arduo trabajo y dedicación.

Dora Hornick, madre de dos niños que han sido estudiantes de Morrissey, elogió a la maestra por su dedicación y lograr sacar lo mejor de cada estudiante.

“Antes de entrar a su clase, mis dos hijos le temían a la escritura, pero la Sra. Morrissey utilizó sus habilidades y ahora se divierten y la disfrutan”, dijo Hornick.

Mientras tanto, en una secundaria no muy lejos de Sanger Elementary School, los estudiantes de 7o grado tienen el honor de ser estudiantes de la clase de matemáticas de nivel Pre-AP de Nadirah Shakir.

Shakir tiene cinco años como educadora en J. L. Long Middle School.

“Shakir es el tipo de maestra que uno quiere en su equipo y la clase de maestra que uno quiere para su hijo”, dijo Erin Moore, maestra también en J. L. Long. “Tiene una habilidad natural de conectar con todos sus estudiantes de una manera relevante. También, tiene un cierto encanto para desarrollar relaciones con cada uno de sus alumnos, de manera que entienden que son importantes para ella dentro y fuera del plantel”.


Dallas ISD da a conocer a maestros del año para el ciclo 2018-2019

Dos de los 10 finalistas  anunciados con anterioridad recibieron la distinción de Maestro del Año de Dallas ISD para el año escolar 2018-2019.

Elisa Morrissey, de Alex W. Sanger Elementary School, fue elegida como maestra del año en la categoría de primarias, y Nadirah Shakir, de J. L. Long Middle School, en la categoría de secundarias.

Stephen Butt, presidente de la división Central Market de H-E-B, presentó a Morrissey y Shakir cheques de $5,000 durante una recepción que se realizó el miércoles, 16 de enero, para reconocer a los finalistas. El superintendente Michael Hinojosa y los representantes de la Junta Escolar agradecieron a los maestros por su arduo trabajo y dedicación.

Dora Hornick, madre de dos niños que han sido estudiantes de Morrissey, elogió a la maestra por su dedicación y lograr sacar lo mejor de cada estudiante.

“Antes de entrar a su clase, mis dos hijos le temían a la escritura, pero la Sra. Morrissey utilizó sus habilidades y ahora se divierten y la disfrutan”, dijo Hornick.

Mientras tanto, en una secundaria no muy lejos de Sanger Elementary School, los estudiantes de 7o grado tienen el honor de ser estudiantes de la clase de matemáticas de nivel Pre-AP de Nadirah Shakir.

Shakir tiene cinco años como educadora en J. L. Long Middle School.

“Shakir es el tipo de maestra que uno quiere en su equipo y la clase de maestra que uno quiere para su hijo”, dijo Erin Moore, maestra también en J. L. Long. “Tiene una habilidad natural de conectar con todos sus estudiantes de una manera relevante. También, tiene un cierto encanto para desarrollar relaciones con cada uno de sus alumnos, de manera que entienden que son importantes para ella dentro y fuera del plantel”.


Three Dallas ISD schools nominated for National Blue Ribbon honors

Three Dallas ISD schools are among only 26 in Texas nominated for the 2019 National Blue Ribbon School award. Judge Barefoot Sanders Law Magnet School, Walnut Hill Elementary School and Jack Lowe Sr. Elementary School are the district nominees.

The U.S. Department of Education awards the Blue Ribbon recognition to schools where students perform at very high levels or where exemplary progress is being made toward closing achievement gaps.

Jack Lowe Sr. Elementary School

Lowe Elementary Principal Sandra Barrios screamed in joy when she saw the email about the Blue Ribbon nomination. Lowe Elementary School was an Improvement Required campus just four years ago. The neighborhood elementary school serves a diverse student population, with many students coming as refugees or unable to speak English.

“The beauty of our culture and being at Jack Lowe Elementary is that we have this one place here at school that unifies us,” Barrios said. “We believe in and push each other until we achieve at our best potential.”

Walnut Hill Elementary

Meanwhile, Walnut Hill Elementary School could be the first Dallas ISD neighborhood elementary school to earn two Blue Ribbons as an exemplary high-performing School, Principal Chase McLaurin said. The school earned its first Blue Ribbon in 1999.

“This nomination is a reminder that Walnut Hill Elementary, which is a comprehensive neighborhood school, is one of the premiere schools in the country,” McLaurin said. “Less than 1 percent of schools ever earn a Blue Ribbon. The possibility of this school earning a second Blue Ribbon is a testament to the great work happening here at Walnut Hill.”

Judge Barefoot Sanders Law Magnet

The Blue Ribbon nomination was especially special for Judge Barefoot Sanders Law Magnet Principal Garet Feimster as a Dallas ISD alumni.  He credited school’s success to the staff meeting the individual needs of students and moving them to where they need to be.

“This shows me what our students are capable of and that they can achieve whatever they set their minds to,” Feimster said. “As a product of Dallas ISD myself, part of my push is that it doesn’t matter where you come from or your background. There are no excuses why we can’t achieve at a high level.”

This could be the second National Blue Ribbon for the Law Magnet, which earned its first one in 2012.

Nominated schools must now complete a rigorous application process through the U.S. Department of Education. Announcements of the national award winners will be made in September 2019. Schools that receive the award will be recognized at the Blue Ribbon Schools awards ceremony in Washington, D.C.


District names 2018-2019 Elementary, Secondary Teachers of the Year

Two of 10 finalists have been named Dallas ISD 2018-2019 Teachers of the Year.

Elisa Morrissey from Alex W. Sanger Elementary School is this year’s Elementary Teacher of the Year, and Nadirah Shakir from J. L. Long Middle School has been named Secondary Teacher of the Year.

Stephen Butt, president of H-E-B/Central Market Division, presented $5,000 checks to Morrissey and Shakir during a dinner reception on Wednesday, Jan. 16, recognizing the educators. Superintendent Michael Hinojosa and trustees thanked the teachers for their hard work and dedication.

Parent Dora Hornick, who’s had two sons taught by Morrissey, praises the teacher for her dedication of bringing out every child’s best qualities.

“Before entering her class, both of my sons dreaded writing, but Mrs. Morrissey worked her magic and they both enjoy writing and find it fun,” said Hornick.

Meanwhile, at a middle school not far from Sanger Elementary, seventh-grade students have the honor of being taught Pre-AP mathematics by the district’s Secondary Teacher of the Year, Nadirah Shakir.

Shakir has spent five years as an educator in Dallas ISD’s J. L. Long Middle School.

“Shakir is the teacher you want on your team and the teacher you want your children to have,” said Long teacher Erin Moore. “She has a natural ability to reach out to all her students in a way that is relevant to each of them. She also has a special charm of building connections with each of her students, in a way that helps them understand how much she cares for them in and out of school.”


Dallas ISD launches new district homepage

A new year brings a new look for the Dallas ISD homepage.

The revamped Dallas ISD homepage provides easy access to the most useful district-related information and news. The new design incorporates feedback from staff and parents.

A few notes on the Dallas ISD homepage…

The most frequently accessed district resources—Calendar, Menu, School Choice, Transportation, and Unified Classroom—are now readily accessible from the homepage.

It is now easier to directly access the full list of Dallas ISD schools and their websites through the drop-down menu.

Check out the “I Want To” box in the top right corner.  We will update this throughout the school year to respond to specific questions that come up.

Turning on the High Contrast button in the top right corner will ensure the website is easily legible for anyone with visual impairments.

We are still sharing the great stories happening every day in Dallas ISD. If you know of a great story for consideration, please fill out this Dallas ISD News Request Form.

We will continue improving this website. Please email any feedback or comments to webservices@dallasisd.org, and we are looking forward to a great 2019!


Sophomore P-TECH students to receive letters of intent at ceremony

Sophomore P-TECH students are invited to attend a Letter of Intent Celebration at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5, at the Eastfield College Performance Hall.

The students will be recognized as they receive letters of intent in their pathways.

Eastfield College is located at 3737 Motley Drive in Mesquite.

Students who enrolled in a Dallas ISD P-TECH have the chance to earn up to 60 hours of college credit, tuition-free. They can earn an associate’s degree or industry certification while earning their high school diplomas.

P-TECH stands for Pathways to Technology Early College High School. After attending their freshman and sophomore years at their high school campus, juniors and seniors attend pathway-specific classes at a partnering Dallas County Community College.

Applications are being accepted for the 2019-2020 school year for specialty programs and schools now through Jan. 31. Learn more about P-TECHs here. Find information on of the district’s special programs and schools and apply here.


Propuesta crearía dos escuelas nuevas con programa para estudiantes talentosos y dotados

Un plan bajo consideración de la Junta Escolar crearía dos escuelas nuevas que ofrecerían el programa para estudiantes talentosos y dotados (TAG, en inglés) en el sur de Dallas.

Roger Q. Mills Elementary School y Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard pasarían a ser escuelas TAG según dicha propuesta. Los estudiantes actualmente matriculados en Twain y Mills tendrían la opción de quedarse para terminar sus estudios primarios en dichas escuelas.

Stephanie Elizalde, directora de Liderazgo Escolar, comentó que las escuelas producirían más oportunidades de aprendizaje en el sur de Dallas. En el distrito, hay aproximadamente 1,800 estudiantes que pueden participar en el programa, pero no asisten a una escuela con dicho programa.

“Las dos escuelas nos ayudarían a dar equidad a las familias en el sur de la ciudad”, dijo Elizalde.

Los funcionarios del distrito trataron el plan con la Junta Escolar de Dallas ISD durante la reunión del 10 de enero. Más detalles a continuación:

  • Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard serviría a los estudiantes TAG, de 1o a 5o La zona de asistencia de Twain se combinaría con las de Adelle Turner Elementary School y John Carpenter Elementary School.
  • Roger Q. Mills Elementary School se expandiría para servir a estudiantes TAG de los grados 1 a 8. La zona de asistencia de Mills se combinaría con la de Cedar Crest Elementary School.

El Dallas ISD llevó a cabo reuniones en ambas escuelas para escuchar la opinión de la comunidad sobre la propuesta. La Junta Escolar tomará en consideración el plan durante la reunión del 24 de enero.


Propuesta crearía dos escuelas nuevas con programa para estudiantes talentosos y dotados

Un plan bajo consideración de la Junta Escolar crearía dos escuelas nuevas que ofrecerían el programa para estudiantes talentosos y dotados (TAG, en inglés) en el sur de Dallas.

Roger Q. Mills Elementary School y Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard pasarían a ser escuelas TAG según dicha propuesta. Los estudiantes actualmente matriculados en Twain y Mills tendrían la opción de quedarse para terminar sus estudios primarios en dichas escuelas.

Stephanie Elizalde, directora de Liderazgo Escolar, comentó que las escuelas producirían más oportunidades de aprendizaje en el sur de Dallas. En el distrito, hay aproximadamente 1,800 estudiantes que pueden participar en el programa, pero no asisten a una escuela con dicho programa.

“Las dos escuelas nos ayudarían a dar equidad a las familias en el sur de la ciudad”, dijo Elizalde.

Los funcionarios del distrito trataron el plan con la Junta Escolar de Dallas ISD durante la reunión del 10 de enero. Más detalles a continuación:

  • Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard serviría a los estudiantes TAG, de 1o a 5o La zona de asistencia de Twain se combinaría con las de Adelle Turner Elementary School y John Carpenter Elementary School.
  • Roger Q. Mills Elementary School se expandiría para servir a estudiantes TAG de los grados 1 a 8. La zona de asistencia de Mills se combinaría con la de Cedar Crest Elementary School.

El Dallas ISD llevó a cabo reuniones en ambas escuelas para escuchar la opinión de la comunidad sobre la propuesta. La Junta Escolar tomará en consideración el plan durante la reunión del 24 de enero.


Apply by Jan. 31 for 2019 Mayor’s Summer Intern Fellows program













Time is running out for students to apply for a job in the 2019 Mayor’s Intern Fellows Program – the deadline is Jan. 31.

The program offers an 8-week, paid internship (interns were paid $10-$17 per hour last year) with a local company or nonprofit agency. Last year, 2,400 students applied and 395 were chosen for internships. In its 12th year, the program, designed by Education is Freedom, is seeking to expand in more ways than one.

At a kickoff event on Tuesday, Jan. 15, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings and representatives from sponsoring companies AT&T, Bank of America, Chase and Highland Capital Management made pitches to expand the program to include additional companies and nonprofits. With expansion, more students could land internships.

The best pitch for the program, however, came from eight former interns. Each credited the intern program for making a difference in their lives – from giving them a jumpstart in a future career or giving them confidence to push themselves to succeed.

Internship hopefuls must live in the City of Dallas and attend a Dallas ISD school, Richardson ISD high school or charter high school. They must be age 16 and eligible to work in the United States by June 10. Additionally, they must have at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA, solid school attendance record and a letter of recommendation from their schools.

There are also required training sessions and mock interview sessions conducted by each participating school. Applicants will attend a job fair on April 1 to meet with potential employers.

Find detailed information and the application at www.mayorsinterns.org.


Apply by Jan. 31 for 2019 Mayor’s Summer Intern Fellows program













Time is running out for students to apply for a job in the 2019 Mayor’s Intern Fellows Program – the deadline is Jan. 31.

The program offers an 8-week, paid internship (interns were paid $10-$17 per hour last year) with a local company or nonprofit agency. Last year, 2,400 students applied and 395 were chosen for internships. In its 12th year, the program, designed by Education is Freedom, is seeking to expand in more ways than one.

At a kickoff event on Tuesday, Jan. 15, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings and representatives from sponsoring companies AT&T, Bank of America, Chase and Highland Capital Management made pitches to expand the program to include additional companies and nonprofits. With expansion, more students could land internships.

The best pitch for the program, however, came from eight former interns. Each credited the intern program for making a difference in their lives – from giving them a jumpstart in a future career or giving them confidence to push themselves to succeed.

Internship hopefuls must live in the City of Dallas and attend a Dallas ISD school, Richardson ISD high school or charter high school. They must be age 16 and eligible to work in the United States by June 10. Additionally, they must have at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA, solid school attendance record and a letter of recommendation from their schools.

There are also required training sessions and mock interview sessions conducted by each participating school. Applicants will attend a job fair on April 1 to meet with potential employers.

Find detailed information and the application at www.mayorsinterns.org.


Apply by Jan. 31 for 2019 Mayor’s Summer Intern Fellows program













Time is running out for students to apply for a job in the 2019 Mayor’s Intern Fellows Program – the deadline is Jan. 31.

The program offers an 8-week, paid internship (interns were paid $10-$17 per hour last year) with a local company or nonprofit agency. Last year, 2,400 students applied and 395 were chosen for internships. In its 12th year, the program, designed by Education is Freedom, is seeking to expand in more ways than one.

At a kickoff event on Tuesday, Jan. 15, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings and representatives from sponsoring companies AT&T, Bank of America, Chase and Highland Capital Management made pitches to expand the program to include additional companies and nonprofits. With expansion, more students could land internships.

The best pitch for the program, however, came from eight former interns. Each credited the intern program for making a difference in their lives – from giving them a jumpstart in a future career or giving them confidence to push themselves to succeed.

Internship hopefuls must live in the City of Dallas and attend a Dallas ISD school, Richardson ISD high school or charter high school. They must be age 16 and eligible to work in the United States by June 10. Additionally, they must have at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA, solid school attendance record and a letter of recommendation from their schools.

There are also required training sessions and mock interview sessions conducted by each participating school. Applicants will attend a job fair on April 1 to meet with potential employers.

Find detailed information and the application at www.mayorsinterns.org.


Apply by Jan. 31 for 2019 Mayor’s Summer Intern Fellows program













Time is running out for students to apply for a job in the 2019 Mayor’s Intern Fellows Program – the deadline is Jan. 31.

The program offers an 8-week, paid internship (interns were paid $10-$17 per hour last year) with a local company or nonprofit agency. Last year, 2,400 students applied and 395 were chosen for internships. In its 12th year, the program, designed by Education is Freedom, is seeking to expand in more ways than one.

At a kickoff event on Tuesday, Jan. 15, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings and representatives from sponsoring companies AT&T, Bank of America, Chase and Highland Capital Management made pitches to expand the program to include additional companies and nonprofits. With expansion, more students could land internships.

The best pitch for the program, however, came from eight former interns. Each credited the intern program for making a difference in their lives – from giving them a jumpstart in a future career or giving them confidence to push themselves to succeed.

Internship hopefuls must live in the City of Dallas and attend a Dallas ISD school, Richardson ISD high school or charter high school. They must be age 16 and eligible to work in the United States by June 10. Additionally, they must have at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA, solid school attendance record and a letter of recommendation from their schools.

There are also required training sessions and mock interview sessions conducted by each participating school. Applicants will attend a job fair on April 1 to meet with potential employers.

Find detailed information and the application at www.mayorsinterns.org.


Apply by Jan. 31 for 2019 Mayor’s Summer Intern Fellows program













Time is running out for students to apply for a job in the 2019 Mayor’s Intern Fellows Program – the deadline is Jan. 31.

The program offers an 8-week, paid internship (interns were paid $10-$17 per hour last year) with a local company or nonprofit agency. Last year, 2,400 students applied and 395 were chosen for internships. In its 12th year, the program, designed by Education is Freedom, is seeking to expand in more ways than one.

At a kickoff event on Tuesday, Jan. 15, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings and representatives from sponsoring companies AT&T, Bank of America, Chase and Highland Capital Management made pitches to expand the program to include additional companies and nonprofits. With expansion, more students could land internships.

The best pitch for the program, however, came from eight former interns. Each credited the intern program for making a difference in their lives – from giving them a jumpstart in a future career or giving them confidence to push themselves to succeed.

Internship hopefuls must live in the City of Dallas and attend a Dallas ISD school, Richardson ISD high school or charter high school. They must be age 16 and eligible to work in the United States by June 10. Additionally, they must have at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA, solid school attendance record and a letter of recommendation from their schools.

There are also required training sessions and mock interview sessions conducted by each participating school. Applicants will attend a job fair on April 1 to meet with potential employers.

Find detailed information and the application at www.mayorsinterns.org.


Apply by Jan. 31 for 2019 Mayor’s Summer Intern Fellows program













Time is running out for students to apply for a job in the 2019 Mayor’s Intern Fellows Program – the deadline is Jan. 31.

The program offers an 8-week, paid internship (interns were paid $10-$17 per hour last year) with a local company or nonprofit agency. Last year, 2,400 students applied and 395 were chosen for internships. In its 12th year, the program, designed by Education is Freedom, is seeking to expand in more ways than one.

At a kickoff event on Tuesday, Jan. 15, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings and representatives from sponsoring companies AT&T, Bank of America, Chase and Highland Capital Management made pitches to expand the program to include additional companies and nonprofits. With expansion, more students could land internships.

The best pitch for the program, however, came from eight former interns. Each credited the intern program for making a difference in their lives – from giving them a jumpstart in a future career or giving them confidence to push themselves to succeed.

Internship hopefuls must live in the City of Dallas and attend a Dallas ISD school, Richardson ISD high school or charter high school. They must be age 16 and eligible to work in the United States by June 10. Additionally, they must have at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA, solid school attendance record and a letter of recommendation from their schools.

There are also required training sessions and mock interview sessions conducted by each participating school. Applicants will attend a job fair on April 1 to meet with potential employers.

Find detailed information and the application at www.mayorsinterns.org.


Apply by Jan. 31 for 2019 Mayor’s Summer Intern Fellows program













Time is running out for students to apply for a job in the 2019 Mayor’s Intern Fellows Program – the deadline is Jan. 31.

The program offers an 8-week, paid internship (interns were paid $10-$17 per hour last year) with a local company or nonprofit agency. Last year, 2,400 students applied and 395 were chosen for internships. In its 12th year, the program, designed by Education is Freedom, is seeking to expand in more ways than one.

At a kickoff event on Tuesday, Jan. 15, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings and representatives from sponsoring companies AT&T, Bank of America, Chase and Highland Capital Management made pitches to expand the program to include additional companies and nonprofits. With expansion, more students could land internships.

The best pitch for the program, however, came from eight former interns. Each credited the intern program for making a difference in their lives – from giving them a jumpstart in a future career or giving them confidence to push themselves to succeed.

Internship hopefuls must live in the City of Dallas and attend a Dallas ISD school, Richardson ISD high school or charter high school. They must be age 16 and eligible to work in the United States by June 10. Additionally, they must have at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA, solid school attendance record and a letter of recommendation from their schools.

There are also required training sessions and mock interview sessions conducted by each participating school. Applicants will attend a job fair on April 1 to meet with potential employers.

Find detailed information and the application at www.mayorsinterns.org.


Effort seeks volunteers to count, survey area homeless youth

The Metro Dallas Homeless Alliance Youth Committee is seeking volunteers to help conduct brief surveys to help determine the number of homeless youth in the city, an important step in helping end youth homelessness.

The effort will be conducted Jan. 31-Feb. 3 and Feb. 7-10. During the city’s “See Us Now-Youth Survey,” groups of volunteers led by agency staff and other youth-serving professionals will visit areas in Dallas and Collin counties to identify youth living on the street or in other unstable housing situations. By conducting brief surveys, we’ll be able to collect important data about the number of homeless youth in our city and what they need to grow and thrive.

To volunteer, email countusindallas@gmail.com to receive a link to register for one of the available outreach locations and times.


Marque su calendario para asistir a las conferencias de padres y maestros la semana del 14 de enero

Las conferencias de padres y maestros están programadas para la semana del 14 de enero. En ellas, los padres y tutores de los estudiantes puedan platicar sobre el progreso de su hijo con los maestros ahora que estamos a la mitad del año escolar 2018-2019.

Las conferencias para estudiantes de preparatoria se realizarán el lunes, 14 de enero; las conferencias para estudiantes de secundaria se llevarán a cabo el martes, 15 de enero; y las conferencias para estudiantes de la primaria serán el jueves, 17 de enero. Invitamos a los padres a que se comuniquen con la escuela de su hijo para la hora exacta de las conferencias en su plantel.

Cuando los padres se reúnen con los maestros, no solo demuestran que la educación es una prioridad, sino también tienen una buena oportunidad para platicar sobre el progreso de su hijo e informarse sobre las distintas maneras en que pueden ayudarle a salir adelante en la escuela. Asimismo, pueden aprender sobre los recursos disponibles en línea para estar al tanto del progreso académico, al igual que la asistencia escolar y las tareas asignadas.

Considere estos consejos para aprovechar las conferencias al máximo:

  1. Las conferencias ofrecen una oportunidad para que los padres y maestros trabajen en colaboración en el desarrollo de un plan para apoyar el aprendizaje del estudiante. Esto puede incluir un acuerdo en el que los padres se comprometen a tener requisitos en el hogar y el maestro define proyectos, fechas de entrega y lo que se va a cubrir en la clase.
  2. Al trabajar en equipo, los maestros y los padres pueden asegurar que los estudiantes estén aprendiendo lo requerido en cada grado escolar. Este tipo de colaboración es imprescindible en lo que los estudiantes se preparan para presentar los exámenes del estado. Varias escuelas proporcionarán sesiones de tutoría antes y después del día escolar las semanas previas a los exámenes. Pregunte sobre la tutoría u otros recursos disponibles para ayudar a los estudiantes fuera del horario regular de clases.
  3. Aquellos padres que no pueden asistir a las conferencias los días indicados deben saber que pueden comunicarse a la escuela para programar una conferencia con el maestro de su hijo. Si no es posible reunirse con el maestro en persona, no duden en preguntar si hay otras maneras de mantenerse informado sobre el progreso académico de su hijo.

Plan would create two new TAG schools in southern Dallas

A plan under consideration would create two new Talented and Gifted schools in southern Dallas.

Roger Q. Mills Elementary School and Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard would become TAG campuses under the proposal. Students who currently attend Twain and Mills elementary schools would be invited to stay and complete their elementary educations at the campuses.

Chief of School Leadership Stephanie Elizalde said the schools would increase learning opportunities in southern Dallas. There are approximately 1,800 Dallas ISD elementary students who qualify as talented and gifted but do not attend a TAG school

“These two schools would help us provide equity to families in southern Dallas,” Elizalde said.

District officials discussed the plan with Dallas ISD trustees during a Jan. 10 board briefing. Other details include:

  • Mark Twain Leadership Vanguard would serve TAG students in grades 1–5. The school’s attendance zone would consolidate with Adelle Turner and John Carpenter elementary schools.
  • Roger Q. Mills Elementary School would grow to serve TAG students in grades 1–8. The school’s attendance zone would consolidate with Cedar Crest Elementary School

Dallas ISD is holding public meetings at the schools to gather feedback and input on the proposals. Mark Twain Leadership Vaguard, 724 Green Cove Lane, is holding a meeting at its school on Jan. 15 at 6 p.m. Meanwhile, Mills Elementary School, 1515 Lynn Haven Ave., is holding a meeting at its school on Jan. 15 at 6 p.m.

Trustees will consider approving the plan at its Jan. 24 board meeting.


Diez educadores son finalistas para premio de “Maestro del Año” de 2018-2019 en Dallas ISD

Diez maestros se encuentran en la lista final para ser considerados para el premio “Maestro del Año” de Dallas ISD para el año escolar 2018-2019; cinco en la categoría de escuelas primarias y cinco de escuelas secundarias. Los ganadores se darán a conocer el miércoles, 16 de enero, en una ceremonia especial.

Finalistas de escuelas primarias:

  • Audrey Gagel, John H. Reagan Elementary School
  • Sheri Kirby, Dan D. Rogers Elementary School
  • Chantrelle Lovett, Umphrey Lee Elementary School
  • Heather Massie, L.L. Hotchkiss Elementary School
  • Elisa Morrissey, Alex W. Sanger Elementary School

Finalistas de escuelas secundarias:

  • Shana Cawthorne-Woods, Maya Angelou High School
  • Megan Malone, School for the Talented and Gifted at Townview Center
  • Marcelo Migoni, Raúl Quintanilla Sr. Middle School
  • Nadirah Shakir, J.L. Long Middle School
  • LaToya Shanks, W.H. Gaston Middle School

Academias Universitarias están aceptando solicitudes hasta el 31 de enero

El periodo para solicitar admisión a las academias universitarias que operan a través de una sociedad entre Dallas ISD y el Distrito de Colegios Comunitarios del Condado de Dallas, está abierto para aquellos estudiantes de 8º grado interesados en aprovechar de esta gran oportunidad. Aquellos estudiantes que son seleccionados tendrán la oportunidad de obtener hasta 60 horas de crédito universitario, o un grado asociado mientras completan un diploma de la preparatoria — sin costo para las familias.

Además de las siete Early College High Schools tradicionales, el programa de academias universitarias de Dallas ISD ahora incluye 18 Pathway to Technology Early College High Schools, escuelas conocidas como P-TECHs, cada una ofrece una educación superior y cuenta con socios en varias industrias.

Estudiantes de octavo grado pueden solicitar admisión aquí antes del 31 de enero.

Dallas ISD está lanzando dos academias nuevas para el año escolar 2019–2020, que también están aceptando solicitudes hasta el 31 de enero. Skyline Collegiate Academy abrirá sus puertas en el plantel de Skyline High School en el sureste de Dallas y North Lake Collegiate Academy se ubicará en el campus del área sur de North Lake College en Irving.

Este año, Dallas ISD inauguró siete academias universitarias y una escuela P-TECH en sus preparatorias. El distrito anticipa lanzar 10 academias universitarias nuevas en el futuro.


Escuelas exclusivamente para niños o niñas están aceptando solicitudes hasta el 31 de enero

Las escuelas de Dallas ISD exclusivamente para niños o niñas se enfocan en el desarrollo del carácter y las habilidades de liderazgo y preparan a los estudiantes para la universidad y una carrera.

Cinco de dichas escuelas están aceptando solicitudes hasta el 31 de enero. Haga clic aquí para llenar una solicitud.

Las escuelas que están aceptando solicitudes son:

  • Solar Preparatory School for Boys at John F. Kennedy Learning Center, 1802 Moser Ave.
  • Solar Preparatory School for Girls at James B. Bonham, 2617 Henderson Ave.
  • Barack Obama Male Leadership Academy at A. Maceo Smith, 3030 Stag Road
  • Irma Lerma Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School, 1718 Robert B. Cullum Blvd.
  • Young Women’s STEAM Academy at Balch Springs, 710 Cheyenne Road

Las escuelas STEM/STEAM están aceptando solicitudes hasta el 31 de enero

Nueve escuelas STEM/STEAM del Dallas ISD están aceptando solicitudes de admisión para el año escolar 2019–2020 hasta el 31 de enero.

Estas escuelas preparan a los estudiantes para carreras en los campos de ciencias, tecnología e ingeniería. Los estudiantes pueden ingresar a esta página para solicitar admisión antes del 31 de enero.

Las escuelas STEM/STEAM que están aceptando solicitudes hasta el 31 de enero incluyen:

  • Solar Preparatory School for Boys at John F. Kennedy Learning Center, 1802 Moser Ave.
  • Solar Preparatory School for Girls at James B. Bonham, 2617 N. Henderson Ave.
  • Dallas Environmental Science Academy, 3531 N. Westmoreland Rd.
  • D.A. Hulcy STEAM Middle School, 9339 S. Polk St.
  • J.P. Starks Math, Science and Technology Vanguard, 3033 Tips Blvd.
  • Justin F. Kimball High School, 3606 S. Westmoreland Rd.
  • School of Health Professions at Yvonne A. Ewell Townview Center, 1201 E. 8th St.
  • School of Science and Engineering at Yvonne A. Ewell Townview Center, 1201 E. 8th St.

Elementary students respond to stuttering in unique way: By making a movie

Students at L.K. Hall Elementary have responded to stuttering in a unique way: by producing a video called “All Lions Roar Differently.”

Speech language pathologist Andrea Vargas brainstormed with Hall students she works with about ways to help others gain perspective on the various obstacles and issues faced by students who stutter. They decided that making a video would be the most innovative approach.

The aspiring filmmakers invited teachers, parents and the principal to the movie premiere. As an introduction to the movie, Vargas provided information on the various techniques used to decrease moments of stuttering. The students also explained what strategies help them the most.

“The students left their big premiere knowing that their voice matters in the community,” Vargas said. “They now know they can accomplish anything they set their minds to; with or without a stutter.”


Make plans to attend parent-teacher conferences during week of Jan. 14

Parent-teacher conferences are slated for the week of Jan. 14 so that parents and guardians can discuss their child’s progress with teachers as we reach the halfway point of the 2018-2019 school year.

Conferences for high school students are Monday, Jan. 14; conferences for middle school students are Tuesday, Jan. 15; and conferences for elementary students are Thursday, Jan. 17. Parents are encouraged to check with their child’s school to learn specific times for the conferences.

By meeting with teachers, parents not only demonstrate that education is a priority, but they can also discuss their child’s progress and learn how to help their child succeed in school. Parents can also learn about resources to help monitor their child’s progress, attendance, and assignments using online tools.

Consider these tips to get the most from conferences:

  1. Conferences are a good time for parents and teachers to work together to develop a plan of action to support students’ learning. This might take the form of an agreement where parents commit to what they will require at home and the teacher outlines projects, deadlines and what will be covered at school.
  2. Working as a team, teachers and parents can ensure that students are learning what’s required at each grade level. This kind of cooperation is crucial as students prepare to take state-mandated exams. Many schools will provide before- and after-school tutoring in the weeks leading up to the tests. Ask about tutoring and whether other resources are available to help students outside of school hours.
  3. Parents who can’t attend conferences on the designated day should know they can call the school to schedule a conference with their child’s teacher. And if meeting face to face is difficult, parents shouldn’t hesitate to ask teachers for other ways to receive updates on their student’s progress.

District seeking partners to further boost student, school success

Dallas ISD has issued a Call for Proposals for non-profits, institutions of higher education, and governmental entities that want to partner with the district to positively impact students’ lives.

Applications from interested potential partners are due by Jan. 25, 2019. Applications can be accessed here. The district is not considering partnering with a charter school or charter school network.

“This creates an opportunity for potential partners to have a significant impact on the lives of students and further support the community,” said Brian Lusk, Dallas ISD Chief of Strategic Initiatives. “These potential partners would bring their knowledge, expertise and resources into our schools that are already doing well. This could take our schools to the next level.”

In 2017, the Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill 1882 that encourages school districts to leverage partnerships to grow innovative practices and improve student outcomes. Proposed partners that are approved by the Dallas ISD Board of Trustees would govern and operate an identified district school. Specific responsibilities, authorities and autonomies would be determined by a partnership management agreement and performance contract.

At their Jan. 10 briefing, trustees discussed a proposed policy to outline district-level requirements regarding these potential partnerships. Trustees are scheduled to vote on the proposed policy at the Jan. 24 regular meeting.


Departamento de Transporte llevará a cabo reuniones para informar y escuchar opinión de los padres

Con el fin de obtener su opinión y mantener a los padres informados sobre asuntos relacionados al transporte escolar, el distrito llevará a cabo reuniones mensuales comenzando en enero.

Dichas reuniones se realizarán en el Turney W. Leonard Governance and Training Center, ubicado en el 5151 Samuell Blvd., de 5:30-6:30 p.m. Para facilitar la comunicación y tratar toda preocupación de los Service Centers, pedimos a los padres que asistan a la reunión según la ruta asignada a su hijo.

Las reuniones se realizarán los siguientes días:

Escuelas Magnet, Academias, Vanguards, y de Opción
• 30 de enero
• 25 de febrero
• 25 de marzo

Escuelas Tradicionales y Educación Especial
Kleberg (Rutas con números 1000) / Lawnview (Rutas con números 2000)
• 15 de enero
• 11 de febrero
• 19 de marzo

Escuelas Tradicionales y Educación Especial
North Dallas (Rutas con números 3000) / Rainey (Rutas con números 4000)
• 29 de enero
• 20 de febrero
• 19 de marzo

Utilizando la información obtenida en enero, febrero y marzo, realizaremos otra reunión el 17 de abril, de 5:30 a 6:30 p.m., para proporcionar a los padres la información más reciente para el año escolar 2019-2020.

Si tiene preguntas o dudas sobre las reuniones, comuníquese con el Departamento de Transporte al 972-925-5010.


Ten are finalists for 2018-2019 Dallas ISD Teacher of the Year awards

Ten teachers are in the running for 2018-2019 Dallas ISD Teacher of the Year, five in the Elementary category and five in the Secondary category. The winner will be announced at a special reception on Wednesday, Jan. 16.

Elementary finalists:

Audrey Gagel, John H. Reagan Elementary School
Sheri Kirby, Dan D. Rogers Elementary School
Chantrelle Lovett, Umphrey Lee ELementary School
Heather Massie, L.L. Hotchkiss Elementary School
Elisa Morrissey, Alex W. Sanger Elementary School

Secondary finalists:

Shana Cawthorne-Woods, Maya Angelou High School
Megan Malone, School for the Talented and Gifted at Townview Center
Marcelo Migoni, Raul Quintanilla Sr. Middle School
Nadirah Shakir, J.L. Long Middle School
LaToya Shanks, W.H. Gaston Middle School


Transportation to host meetings to gather feedback, inform parents

In order to get input and keep parents updated on transportation-related items, the district will begin hosting monthly meetings in January.

All meetings will be held 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Turney W. Leonard Governance and Training Center at 5151 Samuell Blvd. In order to facilitate dialogue and address any concerns from Service Centers, parents are asked to attend the meetings based on the routes assigned to their children.

Below are the dates for upcoming meetings:

Magnets, Academies, Vanguards, and Choice

• Jan. 30
• Feb. 25
• March 25

Comprehensive and Special Education

Kleberg (Routes with 1000 numbers) / Lawnview (Routes with 2000 numbers)

• Jan. 15
• Feb. 11
• March 19

Comprehensive and Special Education

North Dallas (Routes with 3000 numbers) / Rainey (Routes with 4000 numbers)

• Jan. 29
• Feb. 20
• March 19

Using feedback from the January, February, and March meetings, a meeting will be held 5:30-6:30 p.m. April 17 to provide updates to all parents for the 2019-2020 school year.

For questions related to the meetings, please contact the Transportation Department at 972-925-5010.


Recuerde que la prevención contra la gripe comienza con su familia

El número de casos de gripe, reportados en el condado Dallas continúa aumentando.

No es tarde para vacunar a sus hijos contra la gripe. La vacuna es una de las mejores maneras de proteger a sus hijos y familia de la gripe. La vacuna de la gripe puede reducir enfermedades, visitas médicas, faltas a la escuela o trabajo, y el tener que ser hospitalizados a causa de la gripe.

Después de recibir la vacuna, toma aproximadamente dos semanas para que la protección haga efecto.

Otras maneras de proteger a sus hijos de un resfriado común o de la gripe son:

  • Asegure que se laven las manos frecuentemente con jabón y agua o que usen desinfectante de manos
  • Pídales que se cubran la boca al toser o destornudar
  • Asegure que se queden en casa si están enfermos

İRecuerde que la prevención contra la gripe comienza con su familia!

Recurso: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts.htm


Reminder Parents: Flu Prevention Starts With Your Family!

Current flu reports in Dallas County are on the rise.

It is not too late for your child to receive the flu vaccine. The flu vaccine is one of the best ways to protect your children and family from getting the flu.  Flu vaccination can reduce flu illness, doctors’ visits, missed school or work and flu-related hospitalizations.

Once vaccinated, it takes about two weeks for protection to set in.

Other ways to protect your children from common colds and the flu is to:

  • Make sure they wash their hands frequently with soap and water, or use hand sanitizer
  • Ask them to cover when coughing or sneezing
  • Make sure they stay home when ill

Remember, Flu Prevention Starts With Your Family!

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts.htm


SMU to honor jersey of Roosevelt High School alumni and basketball great Ira Terrell

Southern Methodist University will honor the jersey of all-time great Ira Terrell, a graduate of Roosevelt High School, during a halftime ceremony on Jan. 12 at Moody Coliseum. Terrell wore number 32 during his basketball career from 1972-76.

His jersey will join those of Mustang legends Jim Krebs, Jon Koncak and Gene Phillips in being recognized by SMU. Terrell was inducted into the SMU Athletics Hall of Fame in 2012.

Terrell was the 1976 Southwest Conference Player of the Year and was a three-time All-SWC first team honoree. He is the only Mustang to average a double-double for three seasons. He finished his career as the SMU leader and now ranks second all-time in rebounds (1,077). He is also sixth in scoring (1,715) and second in career scoring average (21.4 per game). In 1973-74, Terrell led the Mustangs to a tie for second in the SWC and the Collegiate Coaches Association postseason tournament.

Terrell was selected by the Phoenix Suns in the third round of the 1976 NBA Draft. From 1976-78, he played for the Suns, New Orleans Jazz and Portland Trailblazers.

The Jan. 12 game is a 5 p.m. matchup against American Athletic Conference foe Tulsa. Tickets are available at SMUMustangs.com/Tickets.


¡En enero se reconoce la importante labor de la Junta Escolar de Dallas ISD!

En enero, el Dallas ISD y los demás distritos escolares del estado celebran el Mes de reconocimiento a la Junta Escolar, un momento para agradecer a los líderes escolares por su dedicación como defensores voluntarios de los estudiantes y de las escuelas públicas.

El tema de este año es: “Sembrando semillas para el éxito”, y los integrantes de la Junta Escolar de Dallas ISD hacen su parte, no solo al vigilar la política del distrito y tomar decisiones de adquisiciones en las reuniones mensuales, sino también al visitar con regularidad las escuelas en sus propios distritos.

En general, las juntas escolares tienen la responsabilidad de establecer una visión para el programa educativo de un distrito, diseñar la estructura para lograr dicha visión, garantizar que las escuelas cumplan las expectativas de la comunidad y constantemente abogar por mejorar el aprendizaje estudiantil.

Cada año escolar, el Dallas ISD les solicita a nueve profesionales que colaboren en la administración de un sistema escolar de más de 156,000 estudiantes y un presupuesto de más de $1,000 millones. A la vez, deben considerar y enfrentarse a las realidades que presenta aumentar el aprovechamiento académico de niños de varios entornos socioeconómicos y orígenes étnicos. La finalidad es fomentar un ambiente donde se asegure contar con instrucción de calidad, continuamente se mejore el aprovechamiento académico de los estudiantes, y se forme estudiantes preparados para el éxito en la educación superior o en una profesión.

Para más información sobre los representantes que conforman la Junta Escolar de Dallas ISD, haga clic aquí. Los representantes son:

  • Presidente, Edwin Flores, Distrito 1 (Noroeste de Dallas)
  • 1erVicepresidente, Dan Micciche, Distrito 3 (Noreste de Dallas)
  • 2oVicepresidente, Joyce Foreman, Distrito 6 (Suroeste de Dallas)
  • Secretario, Justin Henry, Distrito 9 (Sur de Dallas)
  • Dustin Marshall, Distrito 2 (Norte y el área del este de Dallas)
  • Jaime Resendez, Distrito 4 (Sureste de Dallas, Seagoville y Balch Springs)
  • Lew Blackburn, Ph.D., Distrito 5 (Oak Lawn, oeste de Dallas, Wilmer, Hutchins y secciones del este de Oak Cliff)
  • Audrey Pinkerton, Distrito 7 (Centro norte de Oak Cliff, partes del oeste de Dallas)
  • Miguel Solís, Distrito 8 (Love Field, Noroeste de Dallas, área central de Dallas)

Consulte el calendario del Dallas ISD para el ciclo escolar 2019–2020

Bajo el calendario escolar aprobado para el año escolar 2019-2020, los estudiantes comenzarán sus clases el 19 de agosto, tendrán una semana de vacaciones por el Día de Acción de Gracias, y terminarán el curso académico el 27 de mayo.

Fechas importantes para tener en cuenta:

  • Primer día de clases: 19 de agosto
  • Día feriado para estudiantes y personal escolar: 2 de septiembre
  • Día de la feria – escuelas primarias/Día de capacitación para personal de escuelas secundarias: 11 de octubre
  • Día de la feria – escuelas secundarias/Día de capacitación para personal de escuelas primarias: 18 de octubre
  • Vacaciones por el Día de Acción de Gracias: 25 – 29 de noviembre
  • Vacaciones de invierno: 23 de diciembre – 3 de enero
  • Día feriado para estudiantes y personal escolar: 20 de enero
  • Día feriado para estudiantes y personal escolar: 17 de febrero
  • Receso de primavera: 16-20 de marzo
  • Día feriado para estudiantes y personal escolar: 10 de abril
  • Días para reponer tiempo perdido por mal tiempo: 13 de abril y 1 de mayo
  • Día feriado para estudiantes y personal escolar: 25 de mayo
  • Último día de clases: 27 de mayo

Regístrense ahora para la Expo STEM de Dallas ISD 2019

La Expo de STEM anual de Dallas ISD se realizará el sábado, 2 de febrero, de 9 a.m. a 3 p.m., en el Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center.

Acompáñennos a disfrutar de este evento, el más grande de su tipo en Texas, donde encontrará más de 140 actividades prácticas y podrá presenciar competencias de matemáticas, ciencias, robótica, tecnología y construcción de puentes entre estudiantes de Dallas ISD. Además, podrán tratar con expertos en diferentes campos, miembros de la comunidad, educadores, socios del distrito en varias industrias y organizaciones de STEM.

La entrada es libre para las familias del área de Dallas, aunque si planean asistir, les pedimos que se registren aquí.

Para más información sobre el Departamento de STEM de Dallas ISD, visiten: www.dallasisd.org/stem.


Single-gender schools accepting applications through Jan. 31

Dallas ISD single-gender schools focus on character and leadership-building skills while preparing students for college and career.

Five Dallas ISD single-gender schools are accepting applications through Jan. 31. Go here to apply.

The single-gender schools accepting applications are:

  • Solar Preparatory School for Boys, 1802 Moser Ave.
  • Solar Preparatory School for Girls at James B. Bonham, 2617 Henderson Ave.
  • Barack Obama Male Leadership Academy, 3030 Stag Road
  • Irma Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School, 1718 Robert B. Cullum Blvd.
  • Young Women’s STEAM Academy at Balch Springs, 710 Cheyenne Road

STEM/STEAM Schools Accepting Applications Through Jan. 31

Nine Dallas ISD STEM/STEAM schools are accepting applications through Jan. 31 for the 2019–2020 school year.

These schools prepare students for careers in the science, technology and engineering fields. Students can go here to apply by Jan. 31.

The STEM/STEAM schools accepting applications through Jan. 31 are:

  • Solar Preparatory School for Boys, 1802 Moser Ave.
  • Solar Preparatory School for Girls at James B. Bonham, 2617 N. Henderson Ave.
  • Dallas Environmental Science Academy, 3531 N. Westmoreland Road
  • D.A. Hulcy STEAM Middle School, 9339 S. Polk St.
  • J.P. Starks Math, Science and Technology Vanguard, 3033 Tips Blvd.
  • Justin F. Kimball High School, 3606 S. Westmoreland Road
  • School of Health Professions, 1201 E. 8th St.
  • School of Science and Engineering, 1201 E. 8th St.

Collegiate Academies accepting applications through Jan. 31

The application window is open for current eighth-graders interested in attending a collegiate academy operated by Dallas ISD and the Dallas County Community College District. Students who attend a collegiate academy can earn up to 60 hours of college credit or an associate degree—at no cost to them—concurrently while earning a high school diploma.

In addition to the seven traditional Early College High Schools, collegiate academies now include 18 Pathways to Technology Early College High Schools. Each P-TECH has a higher education partner and career industry partners.

Current eighth-graders can go here to apply by Jan. 31.

Dallas ISD is opening two new collegiate academies in 2019–2020, which are also accepting applications through Jan. 31. Skyline Collegiate Academy will open on the Skyline High School campus in southeast Dallas, and North Lake Collegiate Academy will be housed on the south campus of North Lake College in Irving.

Now accepting applications: Dallas ISD to launch two new collegiate academies next August

Dallas ISD launched seven collegiate academies and a P-TECH at existing high schools this school year. The district next school year will launch an additional 10 collegiate academies.


Magnet schools accepting applications for 2019–2020 school year

Dallas ISD is home to some of the nation’s top magnet schools. Students interested in attending one of these schools for the 2019–2020 school year can submit applications through Jan. 31.

There are programs for every age level covering a variety of interests. The magnet programs combine challenging academics with specialties such as humanities, communication, STEM and visual and performing arts.

Go here to apply to a magnet school by Jan 31.

The requirements to attend magnet programs vary by school. Applications can be found online. The deadline to apply is January 31.


Dallas ISD Montessori schools accepting applications through Jan. 31

The Montessori schools in Dallas ISD are designed for independent thinkers who enjoy hands-on, collaborative learning.

Four Dallas ISD Montessori schools are accepting applications through Jan. 31. Go here to apply. 

Students in Montessori schools are often placed in mixed-age classrooms. Students choose the activities they want to perform from an available range, and learning is often achieved through discovery by the student rather than direct instruction. Montessori, which was developed more than 100 years ago, is one of the earliest forms of personalized learning.

The Montessori schools accepting applications are:


Application window is open for Two-Way Dual Language program

In Dallas ISD’s Two-Way Dual Language program, students learn to read, write and speak in two languages.

Two-Way Dual Language is currently offered at 51 elementary schools, four middle schools and one high school. Families can apply to a Two-Way Dual Language school through Jan. 31 by going here.

Rhonda Edmundson is a parent of twins who’ve attended a Two-Way Dual-Language program since early childhood. Edmundson said the program has helped her daughters become more academically competitive, socially confident and prepared for a world full of additional languages and cultures.

“Having our girls involved in the two-way dual-language program was a no-brainer,” Edmundson said. “When I think about their future jobs and their future opportunities, we live in a global world and I don’t want to tie them to Texas for the rest of their lives. But, if they should stay here, their Spanish abilities will help them right here at home as well. We live in a global society, and language is really the key to unlocking business opportunities.”

Students in pre-K through first grade are eligible to enroll in the program. The program extends as students advance from grade level to grade level and allows for development in their first and second language.

Students who wish to continue a dual language education at the secondary level can enroll in sixth- through eleventh- grades. In order to qualify for the Secondary Dual Language program, students need to have participated in a Dual Language program in elementary school and be fluent in Spanish.


All high schoolers invited to MLK Youth Summit on Jan. 12

Dallas ISD is moving towards a progressive model of Racial, Socio-Economic and Educational Equity. In this effort, student voices are a valuable and necessary component toward the next steps of engagement.

The Dallas ISD Racial Equity Office in collaboration with the City of Dallas and the MLK Celebration Planning Committee encourages students in grades 9–12  to participate in this powerful opportunity. The theme for the 2019 MLK Youth Summit is “Reconciliation: Moving the Dream Forward”

The Youth Summit is a one-day interactive equity forum for high school students to engage with other students while addressing the challenges faced within their local communities. Students will explore the history of Dallas’ Civil Rights Movement, social engagement, and social and racial equity within the City of Dallas.

The Youth Summit will be held on Saturday, Jan. 12 from 10 a.m.–2 p.m. at IDEA High School, 4800 Ross Ave. Lunch will be provided. Registration is free but students must go here to register to attend.

For any questions or concerns, email info@dallasmlkcenter.com or arnelle.woods@dallascityhall.com.


Sam’s Club donates $252,000 toward STEAM education in Dallas ISD

Sam’s Club donated $252,000 to support STEAM education in Dallas ISD on Jan. 7, with funds going to three schools and the STEM Department.

STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics and points to a focus on providing experiences in each discipline as they relate to real-world careers.

Sam’s Club donated $100,000 to the Innovation, Design, Entrepreneurship Academy; $60,000 each to Solar Preparatory for Girls and Solar Preparatory for Boys; and $32,000 to the district’s STEM Department. The presentation of the funds was during the grand-opening celebration of the new Sam’s Club Dallas Tech office in downtown.

The three schools are among Personalized Learning campuses that require students to submit applications to attend. Learn about these and the many other speciality programs and schools available here. Applications are being accepted now through Jan. 31.


See the approved Dallas ISD 2019–2020 calendar

Under the approved Dallas ISD 2019–2020 calendar, the school year will start for students on Aug. 19, include a full week off for Thanksgiving, and end for students on May 27.

Important dates for the Dallas ISD calendar for 2019-2020 include:

  • First Day For Students: Aug. 19
  • Staff/Student Holiday: Sept. 2
  • Elementary Fair Day/Secondary Professional Development Day: Oct. 11
  • Secondary Fair Day/Elementary Professional Development Day: Oct. 18
  • Dallas ISD Thanksgiving Break 2019: Nov. 25–29
  • Dallas ISD Winter Break 2019: Dec. 23-Jan. 3
  • Student/Staff Holiday: Jan. 20
  • Student/Staff Holiday: Feb. 17
  • Dallas ISD Spring Break 2020: March 16–20
  • Student/Staff Holiday: April 10
  • Inclement Weather Days: April 13 and May 1
  • Student/Staff Holiday: May 25
  • Last Day For Students: May 27

Register now for free 2019 Dallas ISD STEM Expo on Saturday, Feb. 2

Dallas ISD’s annual STEM Expo will be 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center.

Join us for the largest STEM Expo in Texas featuring more than 140 hands-on exhibits and showcases of the Dallas ISD STEM championships in mathematics, science, robotics, technology and bridge-building. Visitors will interact with field experts, community members, educators, industry partners and STEM organizations.

The event is free and open to all Dallas-area families, but those planning to attend are asked to register here.

Learn more about Dallas ISD STEM: www.dallasisd.org/stem.


School Board Recognition Month honors trustees for their dedication

Dallas ISD and school districts across the state are celebrating School Board Recognition Month in January, a time to thank local leaders for their dedication as volunteer advocates for children and public schools.

From left: Audrey Pinkerton, Joyce Foreman, Dustin Marshall, Dan Micciche, Lew Blackburn, Edwin Flores, Miguel Solis, Superintendent Michael Hinojosa, Jaime Resendez and Justin Henry.

This year’s theme is “Planting Seeds of Success,” and Dallas ISD trustees do that through not only overseeing policy and purchasing decisions at monthly meetings, but also by regularly visiting the schools in their individual districts.

Overall, school boards are charged with establishing a vision for a district’s education program, designing a structure to achieve that vision, ensuring that schools are accountable to the community, and strongly advocating continuous improvement in student learning.

Each school year, Dallas ISD asks nine busy professionals to collaboratively manage a school system with more than 156,000 students and an annual budget of more than $1 billion. At the same time, they must consider and contend the realities of boosting academic achievement for children from a variety of socio-economic and ethnic backgrounds. The end goal is to foster an environment that ensures quality instruction, continually increases student achievement and produces graduates who are prepared for success in college or in careers.

Learn more about Dallas ISD trustees on the district website here. The trustees are:

  • President, Edwin Flores, District 1 (Northwest Dallas)
  • 1st Vice President, Dan Micciche, District 3 (Northeast Dallas)
  • 2nd Vice President, Joyce Foreman, District 6 (Southwest Dallas)
  • Board Secretary, Justin Henry, District 9 (South Dallas)
  • Dustin Marshall, District 2 (North and Near East Dallas)
  • Jaime Resendez, District 4 (Southeast Dallas, Seagoville, Balch Springs)
  • Lew Blackburn, Ph.D., District 5 (Oak Lawn, West Dallas, Wilmer, Hutchins, portions of East Oak Cliff)
  • Audrey Pinkerton, District 7 (North Central Oak Cliff, parts of West Dallas)
  • Miguel Solis, District 8 (Love Field, Northwest Dallas, Central Dallas)

Como solicitar admisión a Henry W. Longfellow Career Exploration Academy

Henry W. Longfellow Career Exploration Academy es una escuela secundaria magnet que ofrece a los estudiantes un currículo riguroso y donde además se les anima a identificar e investigar opciones profesionales para el futuro. En Longfellow se ofrece el mismo plan de estudios de secundarias que en las demás escuelas secundarias de Dallas ISD y de igual forma, se prepara a los estudiantes con clases de nivel pre-AP, cursos de crédito de preparatoria, oportunidades de educación profesional y técnica, prácticas, aprendizaje basado en proyectos, informática y más.

El personal de Longfellow invita a las familias y a los estudiantes a un evento especial el lunes, 7 de enero, de 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., en la escuela, ubicada en el 5314 Boaz St. El propósito es ayudar a las familias a tomar la importante decisión de elegir la mejor escuela para su hijo antes del 31 de enero, fecha límite para entregar una solicitud para una escuela especializada de Dallas ISD.

Para ver un folleto con información sobre lo que se ofrece en Longfellow, haga clic aquí. Para información sobre lo que debe traer al evento, haga clic aquí. Un vídeo reciente, disponible aquí, también muestra un poco de lo que sucede en el día a día en Longfellow.


Michelle Obama sorprende e inspira estudiantes a que realicen sus sueños

Estudiantes de Irma Rangel Leadership School participaban en un panel de discusión en el Winspear Opera House sobre la nueva autobiografía de la ex primera dama Michelle Obama cuando recibieron una gran sorpresa.

Obama salió detrás de una cortina durante la discusión lo que sorprendió a las estudiantes ya que no tenían idea que estaba allí. Fue tanto el shock fue que algunas lloraron de la emoción.

Obama se encontraba en la ciudad para platicar sobre su nuevo libro, Becoming, esa noche en el American Airlines Center (AAC). Gracias a varios patrocinadores y donaciones de la oficina de Obama, más de 100 estudiantes de Dallas ISD tuvieron la oportunidad de escucharla en el AAC.

Mientras tanto, el Departamento Extended Learning Opportunities de Dallas ISD, en colaboración con Educate Texas/Texas College Access Network, regaló 100 entradas donadas por la oficina de Michelle Obama a estudiantes de preparatoria. Antes de su discurso, las estudiantes se reunieron en las oficinas de Communities Foundation of Texas dónde recibieron copias del libro de parte de Half Price Books, decoraron cartulinas para mostrar su aprecio hacia la ex primera dama y hablaron sobre lo que significa para ellas.

“Esta experiencia llena mi futuro de esperanza. Me motiva a esforzarme en lo que estoy haciendo en la escuela”, dijo Julia, estudiante de James Madison High School. “Nos da el valor para seguir adelante, sin importar nuestros origines. No importa de dónde vengamos, todo es posible”.

Asimismo, 20 estudiantes de 11 escuelas del distrito escucharon la plática de Obama en AAC gracias a entradas donadas por el College Board. El Departamento Servicios Académicos Avanzados y la Oficina de Equidad Racial de Dallas ISD eligieron estudiantes diferentes de culturas y áreas de la ciudad.

“Nuestra meta en la Oficina de Equidad Racial es ayudar y apoyar al distrito al proveer recursos adicionales y diferentes para apoyar a nuestros estudiantes”, dijo el jefe adjunto de la Oficina de Equidad Racial, Leslie Williams. “Esta fue una gran oportunidad para un grupo diverso de estudiantes pudiera ver y escuchar a una líder importante y aprender más sobre la cultura afroamericana”.


Racial Equity Office announces the first Racial Equity Leadership Training Team


The Dallas ISD Racial Equity Office (REO) is excited to announce the first Racial Equity Leadership Training Team.

The strategic professional development framework for Dallas ISD Racial Equity Office is a model that includes the following theoretical and philosophical components: Implicit bias / Unconscious bias, Cultural Intelligence, Cultural Competency, Culturally Responsive and Relevant Teaching and Learning. In addition, the REO recognizes the need to deliver content on the historical ramifications of race, which is why Critical Race Theory through the medium of ongoing “Courageous Conversations” will be an overlay of the professional development framework in various context.

The Racial Equity Office will utilize internal and external thought leaders to create a professional development sustainability model that will support district wide distribution of essential content.

The first Racial Equity Leadership Training cohort includes a multitude of district employees from a wide variety of departments, including, but not limited to, the following departments: Human Capital Management, School Leadership, Teaching and Learning, amongst others. The team recently participated in a two-day training that was conducted by the Cultural Intelligence Center. The Cultural Intelligence Center has trained global organizations, educational institutions such as Harvard University and corporations such as Google, Inc.

Training for Dallas ISD district employees started Fall 2018 and will continue throughout the 2019 spring semester; with ongoing professional development each year.

Eventually, students will also receive educational content designed specifically to enhance student professional growth and development to support their transition into a globalized world full of culture.


H.W. Longfellow Career Exploration Academy to hold Jan. 7 application open house

Henry W. Longfellow Career Exploration Academy is a magnet middle school that challenges students academically while encouraging them to identify and explore career options. Longfellow offers the same middle school academic curriculum available in all Dallas ISD middle schools, and also helps students prepare for the future with pre-AP classes, courses for high school credit, career and technical opportunities, internships, project-based learning, computer science, and more.  

The Longfellow staff invites families to bring their students and their questions to a special application open house from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday, Jan. 7, at the campus at 5314 Boaz St. The goal is to help families make the all-important decision on a best-fit school for their child before the Jan. 31 deadline to apply to a Dallas ISD specialty school.

Parents can go here for a brochure describing Longfellow’s offerings and here to learn what to bring to the application workshop. This video reveals a bit of what campus life is like at Longfellow.


Dallas ISD cheerleading squads strut their stuff at district challenge

On Saturday, Dec. 8, Dallas ISD high school cheerleading squads tuned up their routines to prepare for the UIL State Spirit Competition.

The Dallas ISD Cheer Challenge was conducted at Ellis Davis Field House. Here is how the top squads fared:

3A and 4A
• 1st Place, Hillcrest High School
• 2nd Place, L.G. Pinkston High School
• 3rd Place, Franklin D. Roosevelt High School

5A, Division II
• 1st Place, W.H. Adamson High School
• 2nd Place, Justin F. Kimball High School
• 3rd Place, Seagoville High School
• 4th Place, South Oak Cliff High School

5A Division 1/Coed
• 1st Place, Sunset High School
• 2nd Place, Moises E. Molina High School
• 3rd Place, Bryan Adams High School
• 4th Place, W.W. Samuell High School

Stunt Competition
• 1st Place, David W. Carter High School
• 2nd Place, Justin F. Kimball High School
• 3rd Place, W.H. Adamson High School
• 4th Place, H. Grady Spruce High School
• 5th Place, Hillcrest High School

Find photos from the Dallas ISD Cheer Challenge here.

The State Spirit Competition is set for Jan. 17-19 at the Fort Worth Convention Center. The “Spirit” extracurricular activity focuses on the traditional game-day role that cheerleaders have on the sidelines and in schools to support athletics teams. Schools will compete in three categories: crowd leading, fight song, and band dance.


Escuelas ofrecerán alimentos gratis durante las vacaciones de invierno

Este año, la cantidad de alimentos ofrecidos a los estudiantes por el Departamento de Servicios de Alimentos y Nutrición Infantil de Dallas ISD durante las vacaciones del Día de Acción de Gracias casi se triplicó.

Break Meals, un programa del distrito creado para asegurar que los estudiantes tengan acceso a alimentos saludables y sabrosos cuando no hay clases, se ofreció en 34 escuelas, del 19 al 23 de noviembre. El número de alimentos servidos representó un crecimiento de 260 por ciento en comparación con el año pasado.

Los alimentos se ofrecerán el 21 y del 26 al 28 de diciembre, y del 2 al 4 de enero, de 8 a 9 a.m. y 11 a.m. al mediodía, en escuelas participantes. Break Meals son gratis para todos de 18 años de edad o menos que participen en una actividad educacional o enriquecedora.

Aquí está la lista más reciente de escuelas que estarán participando.


Escuelas ofrecerán alimentos gratis durante las vacaciones de invierno

Este año, la cantidad de alimentos ofrecidos a los estudiantes por el Departamento de Servicios de Alimentos y Nutrición Infantil de Dallas ISD durante las vacaciones del Día de Acción de Gracias casi se triplicó.

Break Meals, un programa del distrito creado para asegurar que los estudiantes tengan acceso a alimentos saludables y sabrosos cuando no hay clases, se ofreció en 34 escuelas, del 19 al 23 de noviembre. El número de alimentos servidos representó un crecimiento de 260 por ciento en comparación con el año pasado.

Los alimentos se ofrecerán el 21 y del 26 al 28 de diciembre, y del 2 al 4 de enero, de 8 a 9 a.m. y 11 a.m. al mediodía, en escuelas participantes. Break Meals son gratis para todos de 18 años de edad o menos que participen en una actividad educacional o enriquecedora.

Aquí está la lista más reciente de escuelas que estarán participando.


Michelle Obama surprises, inspires students to ‘Reach Higher’

Students from Irma Rangel Women’s Leadership School were on a panel discussing First Lady Michelle Obama’s new memoir when they got a surprise of the lifetime.

Obama walked out from behind the curtain during their discussion, much to the shock of the students at the Winspear Opera House who had no idea she was there. More than a few happy tears followed.

Obama was in town to discuss her new book Becoming later that night during a sold-out presentation at American Airlines Center (AAC). Thanks to various partners and ticket donations from Obama’s office, more than 100 Dallas ISD students got to hear her speak at the AAC.

Photo courtesy Amanda Harris of amandalynn.co for Educate Texas at Communities Foundation of Texas

Meanwhile, Educate Texas/Texas College Access Network provided 100 tickets for high school students to see Obama. Prior to the speech, the students gathered at Communities Foundation of Texas and were surprised with free copies of Becoming from Half Price Books. The students also made posters showing their appreciation of Obama and talked about what she means to them.

“This experience gives me hope for my future. It encourages me to do better in anything I’m doing in school,” said Julia, a student at Madison High School. “It gives us the courage to push forward, no matter what our background is. No matter where we come from, anything is possible.”

Meanwhile, 20 students from 11 Dallas High Schools heard Obama speak at the AAC thanks to donated tickets from the College Board. The Dallas ISD Advanced Academic Services and Racial Equity Office selected the students, who came from all races and parts of the city, to attend.

“Our goal in the Racial Equity Office is to assist and support the district as we provide additional and differential resources to support our students,” Racial Equity Office Deputy Chief Leslie Williams said. “This was an opportunity for a very diverse group of students to see and hear from a powerful leader and learn more about the African-American culture.”


Geneva Heights Elementary students experience joy of holiday shopping





Students at Geneva Heights Elementary School are shopping ’til they drop as part of an incentive program to reward good behavior and attendance during the third six weeks.

Students were awarded “Cougar Cash” in order to buy presents for themselves, a friend or family member. Each student started with $10 and then could earn more during the six weeks. The “Heights Holiday Store” features donated jewelry, candles, toys and trinkets, mugs, frames, gift wrap, ribbons, tape, tags and money donated by Geneva Heights parents and community members. Parents Sarah Shopay and Julie Kim organized the holiday store.

The store was open on Tuesday, Dec. 18, for the shopping experience. Students presented their Cougar Cash to determine how much they had to spend, and then went through the store looking for items.


Departamento de transporte escolar ofrece incentivos por asistencia perfecta, recomendaciones de conductores y retención de empleados

La junta escolar del Dallas ISD aprobó el programa de incentivos del Departamento de Transporte Escolar el 13 de diciembre. Este programa de incentivos ofrece tres tipos de incentivos: incentivo por asistencia perfecta, recomendaciones para conductores con licencia comercial para conducir (CDL, por sus siglas en inglés) y retención de conductores CDL.

El incentivo por asistencia perfecta permite a los conductores de Dallas ISD y los monitores de los autobuses con asistencia perfecta durante el mes, ganarse $50 adicionales por ese mes. El personal que cumpla con este criterio debe tener asistencia perfecta y cubrir todas las rutas asignadas por la mañana y por la tarde.

El incentivo entrará en vigor el 1 de enero de 2019 y tiene el objetivo de disminuir las ausencias de conductores y monitores de autobús. Los puestos elegibles para este incentivo son empleados del departamento de Transporte Escolar de Dallas ISD de tiempo completo que son monitores de autobús, conductores MPV y conductores con licencia CDL. Los empleados pueden ganar hasta $500 adicionales durante el año escolar bajo este incentivo.

El incentivo por recomendación de conductores CDL se le otorgará a cualquier empleado del Dallas ISD que recomienda un conductor con licencia CDL. Una vez que éste ha sido contratado como conductor de autobús. El incentivo paga $200 por recomendar un conductor con licencia CDL y endorso P/S en el momento de contratación y $100 por recomendar un solicitante que sólo tiene la licencia CDL al momento que se contrata.

El incentivo por retención de conductor CDL otorga un premio de $800 al conductor que permanece contratado anualmente. Para ser elegibles, los empleados deben ser empleados a partir del 1 de enero de 2019 y permanecer activamente empleados con el Dallas ISD hasta la fecha en que se paga el incentivo para calificar. El incentivo pagará $400 en diciembre de 2019 y otros $400 en mayo de 2020.

Los conductores de autobús con licencia CDL y credenciales adecuadas empiezan ganando un mínimo de $20 la hora con compensación adicional según el nivel de experiencia.

El Jefe de Operaciones del Dallas ISD, Scott Layne dijo que se anticipa que el programa de incentivos disminuya la cantidad de conductores de autobús que estuvieron ausentes, lo cual puede causar demoras en las rutas de autobús. Layne dijo que a pesar de que el distrito sigue presentando dificultades relacionadas con el transporte escolar, seguimos incrementando la puntualidad en las llegadas a los edificios escolares.

“Hemos encontrado obstáculos al lanzar nuestro propio sistema de transporte, y continuamos implementando cambios que mejorarán la puntualidad de todos nuestros estudiantes”, dijo Layne. “Pero nos sentimos muy alentados por el progreso que hemos logrado y los resultados que estamos viendo. Seguimos viendo mejoras significativas”.

El Dallas ISD sigue contratando conductores con la licencia CDL. Aquellos conductores con licencia CDL que desean ganar por lo menos $20 la hora y para ser elegibles para el programa de incentivos pueden entrar a esta página para presentar su solicitud.

 


Gingerbread project provides holiday highlight at Multiple Careers campus






The Margaret Hunt-Hill Bridge never tasted so good.

Well, at least that’s possibly true of the miniature structure made out of gingerbread, marshmallows and icing by students at Dallas ISD’s Multiple Career Magnet Center (MCMC). It’s part of a baked and candy-bedazzled cityscape that includes a rendition of the school, a skyscraper and will eventually feature Big Tex and the Cotton Bowl.

Chef Stephen Drake, who leads the culinary cluster at the school, has used the gingerbread-building lesson when he taught culinary arts at Roosevelt, Lincoln and Townview Center. Students bake the gingerbread, help plan the structures and then assemble them. The finished product will not be eaten, though. After it is complete, students will destroy their handiwork, a process maybe more fun than baking the buildings.

For Drake’s students, the expectations are high and his approach to them is really no different than he had for students at other schools. On Thursdays, his students cook, prepare and serve lunch at “The Bistro,” catering mostly to teachers and staff at MCMC and surrounding campuses.

The students have made a positive impact on their teacher.

“I have been offered jobs at other schools,” Drake said. “I’m not going anywhere.”

The MCMC is designed to help prepare special-needs Dallas ISD high school students to thrive in careers. The school comprises Culinary Arts, Hospitality & Tourism, Dry Cleaning and Laundry, Business Technology, Childcare, Building Maintenance Technology and Construction Technology clusters. A Career Preparation program is designed for students who have earned enough credits to graduate but can use further career-skills development. Learn more about each cluster here.

Principal Kimberly Wheeler credits staff at the school for its success. She is in her first year as principal there, but many teachers have served at MCMC for many years.

“It’s not just so they can get a job,” Wheeler said of the students. “It’s making sure they are well-rounded.”

Teaching life skills is one aspect. Wheeler said that just recently, students were taken to get state ID cards so they can apply for jobs. Other times, staff takes students to the Social Security office for the same reason.

Timothy Brisco’s father brought the dry cleaning and laundry component to the school years ago. When the elder Brisco passed away in 1993, Timothy was the ideal choice to continue the work because he had been trained in the business, but also trained how to teach.

Brisco said he has five students working professionally at area dry cleaners. He said he doesn’t like to see the hard-workers leave the school, but looks forward to meeting the new students when they arrive.

Dry cleaning services are available there for all Dallas ISD employees, with the benefit of helping students practice the trade.

Hospitality & Tourism teacher Beverly Clemmons helps prepare students for working in front of and behind the scenes at hotels and restaurants. Some of her students earn Safe Food Handling certificates, which not only can help them land jobs, being certified can land them a higher salary than uncertified counterparts.

Construction Technology teacher Terry Stotts helps a student put the finishing touches on a rocking horse in this file photo.

Terry Stotts teachings Construction Technology, which includes many different skills and projects, but one is well-known: wooden rocking horses. Students construct hundreds of the rocking horses each year, and give some of them to the Dallas Ronald McDonald House and others to nearly anyone who wants one.

Stotts’ students also do finely detailed work, such as crafting wooden pen casings, which are beautiful and functional. The end result, though, is having students who thrive using their hands to build.

Staff members take great pride in their students and their daily work. More than one referred to the school as “The best-kept secret in Dallas ISD.” Whether the secret gets out or not, MCMC remains a place that is dedicated to fostering the talents of students who are bound to succeed in their careers.


District to offer free meals for youth at select schools during Winter Break

The number of meals served to youth by Dallas ISD Food and Child Nutrition Services staff during Thanksgiving break nearly tripled this year.

Break Meals, a district program designed to help ensure students have access to healthy, delicious meals when schools are not in session, were served at 34 schools Nov. 19-23. The number of meals represents a 260 percent increase over the previous year.

Meals will also be offered during Winter Break, 8-9 a.m. and 11 a.m.-noon Dec. 21, Dec. 26-28 and Jan. 2-4 at designated schools. Break Meals are free to all children participating in an educational or enrichment activity and are served to children ages 18 and under.

Find a school serving meals during Winter Break here


Transportation Department incentive program rewards perfect attendance, driver referral and retention

The Dallas ISD Board of Trustees approved the Transportation Department incentive program on Dec. 13. This incentive program is comprised of three incentives: perfect attendance, Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) driver referral and CDL driver retention incentive.

The Perfect Attendance Incentive allows Dallas ISD drivers and bus monitors with perfect attendance during a month to earn an extra $50 for that month. Eligible staff must have perfect attendance and cover all assigned morning and afternoon routes.

The incentive, which goes into effect Jan. 1, 2019, aims to reduce the absence rate for drivers and monitors. Eligible positions for this incentive are full-time Dallas ISD Transportation employees who are bus monitors, MPV drivers and drivers with a CDL. The employees can earn up to an extra $500 under the incentive during the year.

The CDL Driver Referral Incentive will award any Dallas ISD staff member who refers a CDL driver applicant who is hired as a bus driver. It will pay $200 for referring an applicant with a CDL and P/S endorsement at the time of hire and $100 for referring an applicant who has only a CDL at the time of hire.

The CDL Driver Retention Incentive awards any CDL bus driver an $800 annual retention incentive. The eligible employee must be an employee on Jan 1, 2019 and remain an active employee with Dallas ISD until the date the incentive is paid to qualify. The incentive will pay $400 in December 2019 and another $400 in May 2020.

Bus drivers with a CDL and appropriate credentials earn a minimum starting wage of $20 per hour with additional compensation based on experience levels.

Dallas ISD Chief of Operations Scott Layne said the incentive program is expected to reduce the number of bus drivers who are absent, which can cause delays to bus routes on a given day. Layne said while the district is still facing some transportation-related issues, on-time arrival rates continue to increase.

“We have encountered bumps as we launched our own transportation system, and we continue to implement changes that will improve on-time arrival rates for all of our students.” Layne said. “But we are very encouraged by the progress we have been making and the results we are seeing. We continue to see significant improvements.”

Dallas ISD is still hiring drivers with a CDL. A driver with a CDL who wants to earn at least $20 an hour and be eligible for the incentive program can go here to apply.


Harllee first-graders get a taste of Texas citrus harvest with oranges









Principal Onjaleke Brown found orange peels everywhere in the classroom.

Normally, such as mess would be frustrating, but the fruity remains were evidence that first-graders at N.W. Harllee Early Childhood Center enjoyed tasting the fresh satsuma mandarin oranges trucked in this morning from Sturdivant Farms near the Texas coast.

The “Harvest of the Month” is an ongoing program by Dallas ISD Food and Child Nutrition Services (FCNS) that highlights a locally grown produce item. Students get to sample the produce and learn facts about it and, in the case of Harllee, sometimes meet the farmers behind the food. Christopher Sturdivant talked about the harvesting process, which involves each orange being individually and carefully cut from the tree and boxed. He also showed a video that showed what harvesting the oranges looks like.

After tasting the oranges, students received cups of dirt to plant seeds they found in their fruit.

FCNS Executive Director Michael Rosenberger pledged Dallas ISD’s commitment to increase local food purchases. The district is a founding member of the Urban School Food Alliance, which also includes Chicago, New York, Los Angeles, Miami-Dade, Orland, Fort Lauderdale, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Boston school districts. The group is aiming to increase the use of locally grown food by at least 5 percent by the 2021-2022 school year. Collectively, that represents nearly $100 million in local food among the 10 districts.

Learn more about Harvest of the Month here.


Dallas ISD CFO announces retirement after report detailing district’s strong finances

Dallas ISD has met board policy of having two months of unassigned fund balance for the first time since June 2013.

Larry Throm

Meanwhile, a five-year financial forecast shows Dallas ISD is positioned to remain on solid financial footing for the foreseeable future, a financial report says.

Dallas ISD Chief Financial Officer Larry Throm briefed trustees on the district’s financial report during the Dec. 13 board meeting. Following his presentation, Superintendent Michael Hinojosa announced that Throm would be retiring again.

“Larry has done a phenomenal job in this district and we are set for the next five years thanks to his work,” Hinojosa said.

Throm served as Dallas ISD CFO during Hinojosa’s first stint as superintendent. In his second term as superintendent, Hinojosa convinced Throm to come out of retirement in 2017 to serve again as CFO.

During his budget presentation, Throm thanked Dallas voters for their significant support for the Tax Ratification Election and bond election to purchase busses. He also thanked trustees and the community for the opportunity to serve Dallas ISD.


Dallas ISD nombra a Directores del Año para el 2018

Dwain Simmons, director de L. G. Pinkston High School, y Damien Stovall, director de Edward Titche Elementary School, tienen mucho en común y entre todo elloresalta su compromiso por transformar la enseñanza y la cultura en sus planteles para poder proporcionar una educación de calidad a todos los estudiantes. 

Ahora,
también comparten el reconocimiento como directores del año Dallas ISD. Simmons
fue nombrado director del año de escuelas secundarias de 2018, mientras que
Stovall recibió el mismo reconocimiento en la categoría de escuelas primarias.

Simmons ha sido director por siete
años, y ha conseguido que sus escuelas logren objetivos académicos que nunca
habían alcanzado. En 2018, Pinkston High School obtuvo la calificación más alta
de su historia, además de dos distinciones estatales. Hace una década, la
escuela tenía una tasa de graduación menor de 50 por ciento, y ahora tiene un
índice mayor de 90.

Bajo su liderazgo, la preparatoria ha
establecido el programa Early College con especialidades en ciencias de la
salud y tecnología.

Simmons estaba cursando estudios preliminares de medicina y odontología en la universidad, pero a través de sufraternidad, tuvo la oportunidad de ayudar a estudiantes de L.V. Stockard Middle School.

“El director de la escuela me dijo,
‘Wow, eres muy bueno con los niños. Deberías pensar en entrar al campo de la
educación’,” dijo Simmons. “Lo hice y no mire atrás”.

Cuando fue asignado a Pinkston,
recuerda haber recibido una llamada donde le decían que no aceptara, que sería
un “suicidio profesional”, porque otros ya lo habían intentado y habían
fracasado.

“Todos los niños merecen un campeón”,
dijo Simmons. “Y cinco años después mi carrera está prosperando. Aún seguimos
aquí”.

Por otra parte, contra todo
pronostico, Damien Stovall ha elevado el aprovechamiento académico de Titche en
su primer año en el plantel.

En sus seis años como director,
Stovall ha creído firmemente en el desarrollo de relaciones sólidas con las
familias para trabajar juntos y mejorar el rendimiento de los estudiantes.
Además, también ha trabajado para desarrollar relaciones fuertes con el
personal de Titche obteniendo resultados positivos.

Cuando Stovall llegó a Titche, la
escuela estuba a punto de cerrar debido a que habían pasado varios años en los
que la escuela no cumplía con los estándares estatales. La dedicación y
liderazgo de Stovall lo cambió todo en un año y de tener una calificación de
“F”, obtuvo una “B”, y además logró seis distinciones estatales.

Stovall dijo que estuvo a punto de no
presentar su solicitud para director del año, pero todo lo que pasaron los
estudiantes y los maestros para lograr el éxito lo inspiro para tratar de dar a
conocer sus historias.

“Titche es la prueba de que los niños
pueden cumplir con las expectativas”, dijo Stovall. “Y respetan cuando se les
respeta a ellos”.


Aceptando solicitudes: Dallas ISD inaugurará dos academias universitarias en próximo agosto

Dos
de los integrantes más recientes a la familia de academias universitarias del
Dallas ISD están aceptando solicitudes en anticipación de su inauguración el
próximo agosto. La academia universitaria Skyline Collegiate Academy abrirá sus
puertas en el plantel de Skyline High School, en el sureste de Dallas, y la
academia North Lake Collegiate Academy estará ubicada en el campus sur de North
Lake College, en Irving.

Ambas
escuelas estarán empezando con sesiones informativas, de 6 a 8 p.m., en las
siguientes fechas:

• Miércoles, 16 de enero, y jueves, 24
de enero de 2019, Skyline Collegiate Academy, 7777 Forney Rd., Dallas 75227

• Jueves, 17 de enero, y martes 22 de
enero de 2019, North Lake College (campus del sur), 1081 W. Shady Grove Rd.,
Irving, TX 75060

Cada escuela ofrecerá un plan de
estudios mixto de preparatoria y early college con especializaciones en varios
campos. En Skyline, se especializarán en las artes escénicas, ciencias y
tecnología de música comercial. La academia de North Lake ofrecerá
especializaciones en el servicio público, justicia criminal y administración de
empresas.

El subdirector Richard Bond de
Skyline, a cargo del lanzamiento de Skyline Collegiate Academy, indicó que la
comunidad está emocionada por esta nueva oportunidad.

“La innovación es parte integral de
Skyline High School. Esta es la siguiente etapa de una prestigiosa historia de
primicias”, declaró Bond. “Invitamos a los estudiantes a que formen parte de la
primera generación de Skyline Collegiate Academy y que, a su vez, consigan un
grado asociado gratis”.

La presidenta del comité toma de
decisiones del plantel de Skyline, Charlotte Smith, que además es madre de un
estudiante de la escuela, dijo que ha estado ocupada platicando con padres de
posibles estudiantes de Skyline sobre lo que pueden ahorrar al asistir a la
academia universitaria.

“No tener que preocuparse por como van
a pagar la colegiatura de la universidad puede afectar de manera positiva a la
familia”, declaró Smith. “Esta sería una increíble oportunidad para cualquier
familia”.

En Irving, se están preparando para la
inauguración de North Lake Collegiate Academy, una asociación entre el Dallas
ISD y North Lake College. La nueva escuela está abierta para estudiantes del
condado de Dallas, y ofrecerá cursos y estudios especializados en el servicio
público, justicia criminal y administración de empresas.

Chase McLaurin, director en Dallas
ISD, tomará el puesto de director de North Lake Academy, dijo que asistir a la
preparatoria en el campus de un colegio comunitario llama la atención de los
estudiantes de secundaria.

“Creo que la ubicación es importante
para los estudiantes”, dijo el director. “Estar en un campus hace que sus
sueños de ir a la universidad sean más reales, alcanzables y posibles. Esto es
algo revolucionario para los estudiantes y les abre un mundo de oportunidades”.

Futuros alumnos de 9o grado que estén
interesados en asistir a estas o a cualquiera de las otras 23 academias
universitarias de Dallas ISD, pueden solicitar admisión hasta el 31 de enero en
www.dallasisd.org/tusopciones.

Desde su creación en el 2016, las
academias universitarias de Dallas ISD se han convertido en un lugar para
estudiantes altamente motivados cuyas familias reconocen el valor de graduarse
de la preparatoria con diploma en mano, y hasta 60 horas de crédito
universitario, o un grado asociado, sin costo alguno para la familia. Estas
escuelas son el resultado de una asociación entre el Dallas ISD y el Distrito
de Colegios Comunitarios del Condado de Dallas. Comparten personal y el plan de
estudios, y permiten que los estudiantes del grado 11 y 12 (juniors y seniors)
asistan a clases en el campus del colegio de la comunidad. Esta es una
oportunidad gratis con la que las familias tienen la posibilidad de ahorrar
hasta $40,000 en colegiaturas de la universidad mientras que los estudiantes
obtienen créditos universitarios en las áreas de especialidad y, a su vez,
consiguen experiencia práctica y trabajan con mentores que son socios de la
industria asociados con cada programa.


Poeta escribe sobre las experiencias de policías y revela el lado personal del trabajo

Como
agente de policía por 25 años en Houston, Sarah Cortez, conoce la labor
policial. Como poeta, intenta dar a los lectores una vista personal a su
trabajo.

Lord,
take from me her dark blue eyes cloudy with fear staring in a hospital room
beyond me, beyond my uniform, nameplate, clipboard.

El martes, 11 de diciembre, Cortez
visitó Townview Center y habló sobre su poesía con los estudiantes de las
clases de Humanidades provenientes de las magnets de Administración, Salud,
Leyes, y Pedagogía. Su visita fue gracias a una colaboración con el Dallas
Institute of Humanities and Culture.

Ha recibido muchos reconocimientos
como poeta, escrito, compartido su conocimiento como educadora y ganado elogios
en el transcurso.

Cortez leyó algunos de sus poemas y
luego dialogó con los estudiantes sobre lo que entendieron y tomaron de las
escrituras.

Un estudiante dijo que parece que a
veces los policías se encuentran entre la espada y la pared cuando quieren
ayudar a alguien y no pueden, lo que puede afectar a los policías.

Cortez estuvo de acuerdo.

“A menudo los agentes de policía
provienen de familias con mucha fe”, dijo. “Eso te ayuda a lidiar con todo.”

Con toda la negatividad que rodea el
trabajo de un agente de policía hoy en día, Cortez piensa que su poesía puede
crear un lazo con la comunidad. No debería ser solamente sobre informar o
hablar de estadísticas.

“Pienso que es la mejor manera de
hacerlos entender mi experiencia personal”, dijo.


Irma Rangel YWLS recibe donación de $15,000 de JCPenney para uniformes escolares

Cuando
Rose Amezquita estaba por asistir a Irma Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School
como estudiante de 9o grado, le preocupaba cómo su madre iba a poder costearle
los uniformes escolares. Entonces comenzó a buscar un trabajo.

Amezquita,
que ahora es estudiante de 12o grado, recordó como su madre no quería que
trabajara. También, se le vino a la memoria el maestro que le regaló una blazer
escolar para su cumpleaños, y a otro maestro que recosió los botones sueltos de
esa misma blazer, sin hacer preguntas. Su hermana menor asistirá a Rangel el
próximo año escolar como estudiante de 6o grado, y su preocupación sobre los
uniformes se hicieron presentes una vez más – hasta que el viernes, 7 de
diciembre, sucedió algo inesperado.

Ese día, JCPenney donó $15,000 para
surtir el clóset de uniformes de la escuela para que las jóvenes que sus
familias no puedan pagar los uniformes puedan conseguir uno.

Misty Tippen, gerente ejecutiva de
Participación Comunitaria y Altruismo de JCPenney, dijo que le conmovió la
lectura que hicieron las estudiantes del credo de la escuela. Confesó no haber
seguido la letra por momentos ya que estaba observando a las alumnas – quienes
dijo que no solo recitaban de memoria, sino del corazón.

Representantes de JCPenney visitaron
otras siete escuelas de Dallas ISD el mismo viernes para alegrar el día a un
número especifico de estudiantes al donar mochilas y tarjetas de regalo.


Estudiantes de primaria reciben regalos navideños de sus sueños (video)

“¡No
lo puedo creer! ¡Recibí Legos! ¡Lo que yo quería!”

El
sonido de papel navideño rompiéndose y gritos de alegría retumbó en las paredes
del gimnasio de Edwin J. Kiest Elementary School el viernes cuando estudiantes
abrieron regalos de sus listas de deseos. Empleados de Salesforce, una firma de
consultaría empresarial, donaron los regalos y observaron sonrientes las
reacciones de los estudiantes.

“La emoción que estos estudiantes
tienen cuando abren sus regalos no tiene precio”, dijo el director de la
escuela Kiest Elementary, Gerardo Hernandez.

La
consejera de la escuela, Keich Willis, y la maestra Kaitlyn Carlstrom
coordinaron el evento en la escuela.

Para
los empleados de Salesforce, el evento fue tan divertido como lo fue para los
estudiantes.

“Para nuestra oficina de
aproximadamente 200 personas, este es uno de los mejores días del año”, dijo
Eric Carlstrom de Salesforce. “Las personas que pueden dejar el trabajo por
unas horas y participar hablan del evento todo el año, y es algo que esperamos
con entusiasmo.”


Author/illustrator brings book to life at Pleasant Grove Elementary

Vuthy “Woody” Kuon’s family escaped war-torn Cambodia to land in Houston, but that wasn’t the only adversity the young boy would face. In school, he had to overcome constantly goofing off and getting into trouble.

Librarian Kathryn McClung asks students what authors and illustrators do before introducing Vuthy “Woody” Kuon.

That is, until he eventually transferred to a different school and found another form of discipline that would change his life. When he got into trouble there, he was handed a book to read. That sparked a passion for the second-grader who would, as an adult, contribute to more than 100 children’s books so far as a writer, illustrator or both. He also operates his own publishing company.

Kuon’s expressive style brings his stories to life for students.

On Wednesday, Dec. 12, Kuon brought one of his books to life for students at Pleasant Grove Elementary School. His stage persona is as animated as the book itself, Humpty Dumpty After the Fall. Students were drawn into the story about how Humpty Dumpty was eventually repaired and vowed to help others instead of sitting idly on a wall. 

Afterward, he created an illustration of Humpty Dumpty with the help of students, who suggested what kind of legs, arms, face and hair (a teacher served as a model in the morning’s first session) should be drawn. 

Learn more about Kuon and his work here


Estudiantes en Hill Middle School STEM Academy exploran la “Hora de la Programación”

El viernes, 7 de diciembre, los estudiantes de Robert T.Hill Middle School STEM Academy cerraron la Semana Nacional de la Informática dedicando una hora para aprender sobre la programación.

La “Hora de la Programación” (Hour of Code, en inglés) es un evento que lleva
a cabo la organización sin fines de lucro, code.org. Empezó como
una introducción a la informática con el objetivo de explicar el “código” que
forma parte de la programación de computadoras. Voluntarios de Accenture guiaron a los
estudiantes a través de un programa parecido a los videojuegos. Sus acciones
guiaron a un robot en la pantalla que recopiló los datos necesarios para
completar la actividad.

La escuela está aceptando solicitudes de admisión para la academia STEM. Si su hijo está interesado en asistir, tiene hasta
el 31 de enero de 2019. La academia ofrece un enfoque dinámico en ciencias,
tecnología, ingeniería y matemáticas. Se ofrece un mínimo de siete cursos que les
da a los estudiantes la oportunidad de obtener crédito de preparatoria. Además
de las actividades especiales y excursiones, hay varios clubs como Destination
Imagination, robótica, entre otros, que enriquecen la experiencia estudiantil.

Para más información sobre los programas y escuelas especializadas de
Dallas ISD, ingrese a www.dallasisd.org/tusopciones.


Fondos donados anónimamente resultan en más de $600,000 para proyectos en el salón

En asociación con Best inClass, un integrante anónimo de la comunidad ha donado más de $600,000 para financiar 1,041 proyectos de salón a través de DonorsChoose para apoyar a los maestros en el área de Dallas. Los proyectos del Dallas ISD que serán financiados incluyen un acuario y conjuntos para investigar insectos, libros para círculos de literatura, entre otros.

Mientras tanto, todo maestro que inicie un proyecto nuevo de DonorsChoose a
partir de hoy podrá ver como el benefactor anónimo triplicará toda donación a
ese proyecto. Esto significa que una donación de $20, por ejemplo, se convierte
automáticamente en una donación de $60. Los maestros pueden entrar en esta página para establecer una cuenta
nueva en DonorsChoose
.

En un evento especial en Winnetka
Elementary School que se llevó a cabo para anunciar la donación, el Superintendente
Michael Hinojosa dio las gracias al donante anónimo por financiar estos
proyectos únicos del salón.

“Nuestros maestros son sobresalientes, hacen
el trabajo adicional y son nuestros jugadores más valiosos” declaró Hinojosa. “El
día de hoy tenemos la oportunidad de agradecerles el trabajo difícil de formar
a los estudiantes en futuros líderes de Dallas.”


Simmons, Stovall are Dallas ISD’s 2018-2019 Principals of the Year

Among the many things they share in common, Dwain Simmons, principal at L.G. Pinkston High School, and Damien Stovall, principal at Edward Titche Elementary School, is their commitment to transforming teaching and campus culture in order to provide all students a quality education.

Now, they also share the 2018 Dallas ISD Principal of the Year title. Simmons has been named Secondary Principal of the Year, while Stovall is the Elementary Principal of the Year.

Simmons, principal for seven years, has led the schools to achieve first-time accomplishments. In 2018, Pinkston High School earned the highest rating in its history and earned two state distinctions. A school that a decade before had a graduation rate of less than 50 percent, has now a graduation rate in the 90s.

Under his leadership, the school has also established a Health Science & Technology Early College High School.

Simmons was a pre-med/pre-dentistry major in college, but through his fraternity had a chance to mentor students at L.V. Stockard Middle School.

“And the principal there said, ‘Wow, you’re really great with kids. You ought to think about going into education,’ ” Simmons said. “And I went into education and didn’t look back.”

When he was assigned to lead Pinkston, he remembered receiving a phone call that told him not to go, that it would be “career suicide” because of others who had tried and failed there.

“All kids truly deserve a champion,” he said. “And well, it’s five years later, and I think my career personally is thriving. We’re not dead yet.”

Meanwhile, against all odds, Damien Stovall has raised Titche’s academic achievement during his first year at the campus.

Throughout his six years as principal, Stovall has been a firm believer of developing strong relationships with his school families in order to work together in improving student achievement. In addition to strong relationships with parents, he’s developed strong relationships with staff at Titche, with positive results that have been more than evident.

When Stovall arrived to Titche, the school was on the verge of closure due to years of not meeting state standards. Stovall’s dedication and leadership took the campus from being an “F” rated school to a “B” campus in one year, as well as led the campus to obtain all six state distinctions.

Stovall said he almost didn’t apply to be a Principal of the Year, but what students and teachers had gone through to find success inspired him to try to have their stories be heard.

“Titche is proof that kids will rise to your expectations,” he said. “And respect when respect is given to them.”

He said anything is possible when there is the vision, goals and plan to get the job done.

“On our worst day, we are the best hope for many of our scholars,” he said. “It’s hard to talk about me, but I could talk about our kids all day.”

The tenacity and dedication of these two campus leaders is what ledt hem to be recognized with the top honor for a school administrator. They were among the eight finalists selected for this year’s school Principal of the Year recognition.

Superintendent Michael Hinojosa said the hard work of principals never goes unnoticed.

“You’re not only the soldiers, you’re also the generals every day in the field trying to improve achievement,” Hinojosa said.

Because he himself was never a campus principal, rising from teacher to assistant principal and then into administration positions, he said he has put systems into place that ensure principals have a voice. In fact, more than half of his current leadership team has served as principals, something not typical.

“I think it helps us make better decisions,” he said. “Because we understand what you’re world goes through every day.”


Poet writes about police experiences to reveal personal side of the job

As a 25-year law-enforcement officer in Houston, Sarah Cortez knows her way around police work. As a poet, she attempts to give readers an insider’s view of her job.

Lord, take from me
her dark blue eyes
cloudy with fear
staring in a hospital
room beyond me, beyond
my uniform, nameplate, clipboard.

On Tuesday, Dec. 11, Cortez visited Towniew Center and discussed her poetry with Humanities classes comprising students from Business, Health, Law and Education magnets. Her visit was coordinated in partnership with the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture.

She has received many distinctions as a poet, writing books, sharing her knowledge as an educator and winning accolades along the way.

Cortez read a couple of her poems to students on Tuesday and then asked students what they took from them.

A student said it seems like sometimes police officers are stuck between a place where they want to help someone, but can’t, which could take a toll on officers.

Cortez agreed.

“Police officers often come from families of great faith,” she said. “It really helps you negotiate all of that.”

With a lot of negativity surrounding the job of police officer these days, Cortez said she sees her poetry as a way to help build a bridge to the community. Such an effort can’t be about lecturing people or spouting statistics.

“I think the best way it to try to bring them into my unique experience,” she said.


Now accepting applications: Dallas ISD to launch two new collegiate academies next August

The two newest members of the Dallas ISD collegiate academy family are now accepting applications in advance of opening their doors next August. Skyline Collegiate Academy will open on the Skyline High School campus in southeast Dallas, and North Lake Collegiate Academy will be housed on the south campus of North Lake College in Irving.

 Both schools are making their debut with information sessions from 6 to 8 p.m. on the following dates:

  • Tuesday, Jan. 15 and 24, 2019, Skyline Collegiate Academy, 7777 Forney Rd., Dallas  75227
  • Tuesday, Jan. 17 and 22, 2019, North Lake College south campus, 1081 W. Shady Grove Rd., Irving, TX 75060

Each campus will offer a combined high school and early college curriculum featuring specialized career pathways in several fields. At Skyline, that focus will be performing arts, science and commercial musictechnology. At North Lake, the offerings will include public service, criminaljustice and business administration.

Skyline Assistant Principal Richard Bond, charged with launching the new Skyline Collegiate Academy, says the community is excited.

“Innovation is part of the Skyline High School DNA. This latest innovation is the next stage of an illustrious history of firsts.”

Skyline parent and site-based decision making committee chair Charlotte Smith agrees. She says she’s busy talking with prospectiveSkyline parents about the potential dollar savings offered by a collegiateacademy.

“Not having to worry about how to pay for college tuition can have a real positive impact on families,” Smith said. “This would be an awesome opportunity for any family.”

Across town at North Lake College, plans are under way to launch the second new collegiate academy, which will offer courses and career pathways in public service, criminal justice and business administration.

Dallas ISD Principal Chase McLaurin, who will serve as the North Lake academy principal, says attending high school on a college campus is a major attraction for middle schoolers.

“I think the location is important for students,” he said. “Being on a college campus helps students realize that their dreams of going to college are real, possible, and coming true. This is a game changer for students and opens up a whole new world of opportunities.”

Incoming ninth-graders interested in attending these or any of the other 23 Dallas ISD collegiate academies can apply through Jan. 31 at www.dallasisd.org/yourchoices.

Since their inception in 2016, Dallas ISD’s collegiate academies have become a niche for highly motivated students whose families recognize the value of their student graduating with both a high school diploma and up to 60 hours of college credit or an associate degree at no personal cost to their families. The schools are a partnership of Dallas ISD and the Dallas County Community College District, which share faculty and curriculum and allow juniors and seniors to take classes on a college campus. This tuition-free opportunity offers families the potential to save up to $40,000 in college tuition while students earn credit in their chosen career pathway and gain hands-on experience and mentoring from industry partners connected to each program. 


Anonymous donor funds more than $600,000 in area classroom projects

Christmas has come early for hundreds of Dallas ISD teachers.

In partnership with Best in Class, an anonymous community member has donated more than $600,000 to fund 1,041 classroom projects through DonorsChoose to support teachers in the Dallas area. The funded Dallas ISD projects range from an aquarium and bug discovery kits to books for literature circles.

Meanwhile, any teacher who starts a new DonorsChoose project as of today will see any donation to that project be tripled by the anonymous benefactor. This means a $20 donation, for example, will turn into a $60 donation. Teachers can go here to set up a new DonorsChoose account.

At a special event at Winnetka Elementary School announcing the donation, Superintendent Michael Hinojosa thanked the anonymous donor for financing the unique classroom projects.

“Our teachers are outstanding, do the extra work and are our most valuable players,” Hinojosa said. “Today we have a chance to show our appreciation for their hard work in molding our students into future leaders of Dallas.”


Dallas ISD Chief Academic Officer to receive award for ‘outstanding contributions’ to STEM education

The Research in Mathematics Education unit at Southern Methodist University has named Dallas ISD Chief Academic Officer Ivonne Durant as the recipient of its Impact in Leadership Award.

SMU stated they selected Durant for her “outstanding contributions to policy, research and practice in STEM Education.”

“Of particular note, this year’s conference theme focuses on access and equity,” states a letter from the Research in Mathematics Education (RME) unit. “(Durant’s) relentless efforts to ensure all students have access to high-quality STEM educational opportunities is inspiring.”

The criteria for nomination and selection for the award was quite rigorous, and included the following:

    • Demonstrated commitment to cultivating the research-to-practice relationship through contributions to policy, research, and/or practice;
    • Demonstrated commitment to supporting teachers’ professional practices and students’ STEM proficiency through leadership;
    • Innovative thinking focused on supporting teachers and systems through a change process to improve student outcomes;
    • Demonstrated commitment to supporting systems-level implementation of data informed decision making.

SMU and RME will honor Durant at their Research-to-Practice Conference happening Feb. 8.


Madison theatre student sings her way into national competition

When Julia Ford was preparing her song at the Texas Thespian Festival in November, she was facing a serious problem.

“My voice had left me, and I’m singing, and I thought, ‘This is not going well,’ ” recalled Ford, a junior at James Madison High School. She quickly made some adjustments to her performance and starting drinking hot tea to soothe her vocal cords.

When it came time for her to perform before the judges, they knew she was struggling a bit but commended her for making the changes and overcoming her vocal hurdles.

That performance of “I’m Here” from The Color Purple put her in the Top 24 of performers and stamped her ticket to the national competition next summer at the University of Nebraska. Only performers who earn perfect scores from at least three of the four judges advance.

Ford enjoys being in the spotlight, on stage and on the sports field. She has played volleyball, softball, basketball, golf and ran track for Madison. She especially loves performing on stage, though, and has her sights set on a career in the entertainment business.

She said “I’m Here” is a special song to her.

“When I heard it, it just touched my heart in a whole other way,” Ford said. “A song is a song. But if you connect with a song spiritually, emotionally, with passion – it’s going to be good if you sing it from the heart.”

Madison Theatre director Cody Moore said Ford is a fantastic student among a group of fantastic students.

“The kids here have the utmost talent,” Moore said. “I’m at a loss for words. It is by far some of the best children I’ve worked with in 12 years.”

This is his first year at Madison, a school he chose to go to because of its reputation for having a solid theatre program. Moore said there is a misconception that neighborhood schools don’t offer high-quality fine arts education, but he said that isn’t true. He had a similar experience at his previous job at L.G. Pinkston High School.

Rachel Harrah, Director of Dallas ISD’s Theatre and Dance, credited Principal Marian Willard for supporting high-quality fine arts programs at Madison.

“Through her support, coupled with the vision and experience of Mr. Cody Moore, the theatre program at James Madison High School is quickly emerging as a leader in theatre education and production,” Harrah said.

Besides Ford’s performance in front of thousands of theatre educators at the Texas Thespian Festival, Harrah noted her opportunity to perform alongside Shoshana Bean, Matthew Morrison and Jane Lynch on the Dallas Summer Musicals stage.

“She has an incredible voice and talent,” Harrah said. “It is only made stronger through the support of her family encouraging her love for music and theatre every step of the way.”


Maestro de secundaria recibe galardón en conferencia nacional de idiomas

Un maestro de español de Thomas J. Rusk Middle School recibió un premio en la reciente conferencia nacional de idiomas y también fue invitado como orador principal durante la asamblea de delegados de la conferencia.

Akash Patel recibió el premio Leo Benardo a la Innovación en la Educacion de Idiomas de kínder al 12o grado de la American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL).

Delante de 500 delegados, expuso sobre la falta de maestros en el país y qué fue lo que lo atrajo y lo mantiene en este campo. Su interés empezó cuando aprendió sobre la falta de educación en la ciudadanía mundial y conciencia cultural. Sin ese enfoque, continuarán los estereotipos, prejuicios y la intolerancia, comentó Patel.

Con el propósito de conectar salones de clases por todo el mundo, Patel y Amy Anderton, directora del Departamento de Idiomas de Dallas ISD, contribuyeron para formar la Fundación sin fines de lucro, Happy World. Dicha organización proporciona recursos para conectar a los maestros con otros salones de clases en el mundo y otorga becas a estudiantes para estudiar idiomas dentro y fuera del país.

La conferencia de la ACTFL se llevó a cabo en noviembre en Nuevo Orleans.

Este año, Patel fue nombrado como uno de los 50 finalista ara el premio Global Teacher, que reconoce a un maestro que ejemplifica la enseñanza y aprendizaje de ciudadanía mundial y otorga un premio de $1 millón.


Se solicitan maestros para programa de doble credencial

La Universidad Texas A&M ha creado un programa para reclutar y formar maestros que están certificados para enseñar cursos de Inglés, Oratoria, Gobierno y Psicología de nivel de preparatoria y universidad (maestros con doble credencial) para apoyar la iniciativa del programa Early College del distrito. El programa busca maestros con una maestría en cualquier área y un mínimo de tres años de experiencia en la enseñanza a nivel de preparatoria.

Los interesados ​​en el programa deben completar un formulario de interés y asistir a una de las sesiones de interés para solicitar y entrevistar para el programa. Se tiene previsto comenzar el programa el 22 de enero de 2019. Las sesiones se llevarán a cabo en las siguientes fechas:

  • Lunes, 17 de diciembre, 5-7:30 pm, en la sala de conferencias del primer piso del edificio HB Bell, 2909 N Buckner Blvd
  • Miércoles, 9 de enero, 5-7:30 pm, en el Laboratorio 62, Suite 1100, en el Edificio de Administración de Linus D. Wright Dallas ISD, 9400 N. Central Expressway.

Si tiene preguntas o necesita información adicional, contacte a Tiffany Gilmore en tigilmore@dallasisd.org o al (972) 925-8915.


Se realiza celebración para que los tutores de Toyota conozcan en persona a los estudiantes que ayudan

Los voluntarios de Toyota que están ayudando a los estudiantes de Dallas ISD con tutoría a través de computadora durante todo el año escolar, se reunieron en persona con los alumnos en una celebración que se llevó a cabo a fines de noviembre.

TutorMate, es un programa de tutoría por internet que conecta a los voluntarios de Toyota con los estudiantes de JN Ervin Elementary School que están aprendiendo a leer. Algunos empleados de Toyota también entregaron regalos a los estudiantes de la escuela.

“Los niños estuvieron encantados de conocer a los tutores nuevos y sus sonrisas valieron la pena”, dijo Tisha Barnett, de Toyota Motors North America. “Estamos en anticipación de otra temporada increíble para ayudar a estos estudiantes en el desarrollo de su lectoescritura”.


Elementary students’ Christmas wish list dreams come true (video)

“I can’t believe I got the Legos! This is exactly what I wanted!”

The sounds of ripping Christmas paper and squeals of delight bounced off the gymnasium walls on Friday as students at Edwin J. Kiest Elementary School opened gifts from their wish lists. Employees from Salesforce, a business management consulting firm, purchased and donated the gifts and smiled wide as they watched the students’ reactions.

“The excitement these kids have in their eyes when they open the presents is priceless,” Kiest Elementary Principal Gerardo Hernandez said.

Campus and district leaders at the ‘Secret Snowman’ event.

Kiest Elementary School counselor Keich Willis and teacher Kaitlyn Carlstrom coordinated the event on the school side.

For Salesforce, the employees had almost as much fun as the students.

“Our office is roughly 200 people, and this is one of the best days of the year,” said Eric Carlstrom of Salesforce. “The folks who are able to break away from work for a few hours and participate, everyone raves about it all year and it’s something we look forward to.”


Event will give parents firsthand look at Personalized Learning activities

In general, “Personalized Learning” is a method of educating children that focuses on each individual student’s interests, talents and goals. In practice, though, what does that really look like?

One of Dallas ISD’s newest schools that follows that model – Personalized Preparatory at Sam Houston Elementary School – invites parents to see Personalized Learning in action at 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 11, at the school, located at 2827 Throckmorton St.

There will be four classrooms demonstrating different aspects of Personalized Learning:

• Learner Profiles: Families will learn what a learner profile is and what its importance is in building a relationship between a teacher and a student. Families will also get an understanding of how teachers use learner profiles to guide instruction and make learning purposeful for all students.

• Technology with Nearpod: This station will provide an example of how technology is used in Personalized Learning classrooms on our campus to reach small groups and individual students. Families will have the chance to participate in an actual lesson through Neared and will see how our teachers are able to work will all levels of learners.

• STEM: STEM, which stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, will be shared  through lessons to help families identify the importance and relationship these areas play in a Personalized Learning classroom.

• Playlist, Stations, and Differentiation: Families will learn what playlists are and how they are used to guide students in selecting stations and activities. Our teachers will have examples of differentiated stations for families to see how activities are based on a student levels and interest.

Like all of the district’s speciality schools and programs, applications for the 2019-2020 school year are being accepted now through Jan. 31, 2019. Visit www.dallasisd.org/yourchoices to learn more about what Dallas ISD offers and apply today.


All-girls school nets $15,000 donation from JCPenney for uniform closet







When Rose Amezquita was about to begin attending Irma Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School as a freshman, she worried about how her single mother would be able to afford the school uniforms. That’s when she started to look for a job.

Amezquita, now a senior, recalled how her mother wouldn’t let her get a job. She also remembered the teacher who gave her a school blazer as a birthday gift, and another teacher who resewed loose buttons, no questions asked. She said her younger sister will begin attending Rangel next year as a sixth-grader, and those worries about affording uniforms returned – until Friday, Dec. 7.

On that day, JCPenney donated $15,000 to stock the school’s uniform closet so that girls whose families are unable to afford school uniforms won’t go without them.

Misty Tippen, Senior Manager of Community Engagement and Philanthropy for JCPenney, said she was moved by students’ recitation of the Rangel creed. She admitted not reading along with them for part of it because she watched the students – who she said not only spoke the creed from memory, but from their hearts.

JCPenney visited six other Dallas ISD schools on Friday to spread cheer by donating backpacks and gift cards to 15 students.


Students at Hill Middle School STEM Academy explore ‘Hour of Code’






Students in the Robert T. Hill Middle School STEM Academy capped off National Computer Science Week by dedicating one hour to learning about computer programming on Friday, Dec. 7.

The “Hour of Code” is organized by code.org and started as a one-hour introduction to computer science meant to demystify the “code” that goes into performing computerized tasks. On Friday at Hill, students were guided through a game-like program by volunteers from Accenture. Their actions guided an on-screen robot that collected the data they needed to complete the task.

Applications are being accepted now through Jan. 31, 2019, to attend the STEM Academy. The school-within-a-school offers a dynamic focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Students are offered a minimum of seven courses that allow them to chance to earn high school credit. Besides special activities and field trips, there are a variety of clubs at the school – from Destination Imagination to robotics – that can enhance the student experience.

Learn more about all the specialty programs and schools offered in Dallas ISD at www.dallasisd.org/yourchoices.


Abre el periodo de nominación para el programa de Educación para Dotados y Talentoso de Dallas ISD

El Dallas ISD está aceptando nominaciones de estudiantes de kínder que están inscritos en el distrito para que se les evalúe para el programa de Educación para Dotados y Talentosos.

Los padres, tutores legales y miembros de la comunidad pueden nominar a los estudiantes. Comuníquense con el maestro del programa de su escuela local para obtener el paquete informativo. Los alumnos deben estar inscritos en el Dallas ISD para poder realizarles la evaluación.

Se aceptarán nominaciones hasta el 14 de diciembre.


Abre el periodo de nominación para el programa de Educación para Dotados y Talentoso de Dallas ISD

El Dallas ISD está aceptando nominaciones de estudiantes de kínder que están inscritos en el distrito para que se les evalúe para el programa de Educación para Dotados y Talentosos.

Los padres, tutores legales y miembros de la comunidad pueden nominar a los estudiantes. Comuníquense con el maestro del programa de su escuela local para obtener el paquete informativo. Los alumnos deben estar inscritos en el Dallas ISD para poder realizarles la evaluación.


Stage set for final round in annual MLK Jr. Oratory Competition

And then there were eight.

After the 16 semifinalists delivered their speeches this week, the field was narrowed to eight finalists who will vie for the top prize on Jan. 18, 2019, at W.H. Adamson High School.

The finalists are:

• Kaiya Hudson, fifth grade, Charles Rice Learning Center
• Layla James, fifth grade, Ronald E. McNair Elementary
• Jasira King, fourth grade, William Brown Miller Elementary
• Tynia Matts, fifth grade,  John Neely Bryan Elementary
• Presley Rivers, fifth grade, Harry C. Withers Elementary
• Tory Robertson Jr., fifth grade, Clara Oliver Elementary
• Kimberli Rouwtt, fourth grade, J.P. Starks Math, Science and Technology Vanguard
• Alexandra Torres, fifth grade, Wilmer-Hutchins Elementary

This year’s question posed to participants is, What would Dr. Martin Luther King say to the children of today?

Judging is based on the speeches that the students write, memorize and deliver on stage. Campus winners from the 16 participating schools advanced to the semifinals. The top eight orators in the semifinals advance to the finals.

This is the 27th year for the competition to be conducted in Dallas.  Law firm Gardere Wynn Sewell had coordinated the event, but merged with another firm this year, Foley Lardner. The combined firm is known locally as Foley Gardere.


Middle school teacher honored at national foreign language conference


A Spanish teacher at Dallas ISD’s Thomas J. Rusk Middle School won an award at the recent national foreign language conference, and was also invited to serve as a keynote speaker during the conference’s Assembly of Delegates.

Akash Patel received the Leo Benardo Award for Innovation in K-12 Language Education from the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL).

In front of the 500 delegates, he was asked to discuss dealing with the national teacher shortage and what drew and keeps him wanting to teach. His interest was sparked when he discovered a lack of teaching in schools centering on global citizenship and cultural awareness. Without that focus, stereotypes, biases and bigotry are often perpetuated, he said.

To further connect classrooms around the world, Patel and Amy Anderton, director of Dallas ISD World Languages, helped launch the nonprofit Happy World Foundation.  The organization provides resources to teachers to connect them to other classrooms around the world and awards scholarships to students for them to study language in this country and beyond.

The ACTFL conference was conducted in November in New Orleans.

Earlier this year, Patel was nationally recognized as one of the top 50 finalists for the Global Teacher Prize, which recognizes a classroom teacher who exemplifies global citizenship teaching and learning – and comes with a $1 million award.


Dallas ISD da a conocer a finalistas para director del año de 2018

El Dallas ISD dio a conocer a los ocho finalistas para director del año de 2018.  A finales de este mes, sabremos los dos ganadores: uno para escuelas primarias y otro para escuelas secundarias.

Los finalistas para escuelas primarias son:

  • Dr. Nancy Bernardino, Solar Preparatory for Girls
  • Chase McLaurin, Walnut Hill Elementary School
  • Israel Rivera, Jose “Joe” May Elementary School
  • Damien Stovall, Edward Titche Elementary School

Los finalistas para escuelas secundarias son:

  • Dr. Janice Lombardi, Skyline High School
  • Lasandra Sanders, School of Health Professions at Townview Center
  • Dwain Simmons, Pinkston High School
  • Arnoldo Zúñiga, Dallas Environmental Science Academy

El proceso incluye una solicitud, requiere por lo menos tres cartas de recomendación y respuestas a dos preguntas: 1) Como líder escolar, ¿cómo empoderas o inspiras a los maestros para que impartan una educación de calidad y gestionen el cambio en su plantel? 2) Si fueras jefe del Departamento de Educación, ¿cuales dos cosas cambiarías, agregarías o arreglarías para mejorar la educación de los estudiantes en tu escuela? Además de esto tuvieron que pasar por una entrevista.


District names eight principals as finalists for top honor in 2018

Dallas ISD has named eight finalists for the 2018 Principal of the Year awards. Later this month, two winners will emerge: one elementary principal and one secondary principal.

Elementary finalists are:

• Dr. Nancy Bernardino, Solar Preparatory for Girls
• Chase McLaurin, Walnut Hill Elementary School
• Israel Rivera, Jose “Joe” May Elementary School
• Damien Stovall, Edward Titche Elementary School

Secondary finalists are:

• Dr. Janice Lombardi, Skyline High School
• Lasandra Sanders, School of Health Professions at Townview Center
• Dwain Simmons, Pinkston High School
• Arnoldo Zuniga, Dallas Environmental Science Academy

The process includes an application, requires at least three letters of recommendation and responses to two questions: 1) As a campus school leader, how do you empower or inspire your teachers to deliver quality instruction and be agents of change on your campus? 2) If you were the head of the Department of Education, what would be two things you would change, enhance, add, or fix to improve education for the students at your school? Applicants were also subject to in-person interviews.


Policía de Dallas ISD organiza colecta para que niños reciban regalo en Navidad

Omar Sepúlveda, oficial de la Policía de Dallas ISD, creció bajo una condición económica desfavorable donde no había mucho dinero, por lo que sabe lo que es depender de donaciones para recibir regalos en Navidad.

Sepúlveda, quien está asignado a Pinkston High School, cree que: “Todo niño merece un regalo en Navidad”. Este es el cuarto año que Sepúlveda organiza una colecta de juguetes para los niños.

“Cuando comencé esta colecta hace cuatro años, pensé, “No soy rico, pero creo que puedo marcar una diferencia”, dijo Sepúlveda. “Estoy tratando de hacer algo por la comunidad que me ayudó cuando yo estaba creciendo”.

Cada año, ha ido creciendo la recolecta de juguetes. Sepúlveda y sus compañeros pasaron parte del día lunes en Walmart comprando más de $800 en juguetes. También, está organizando un evento el sábado, 8 de diciembre, al mediodía, en Pinkston High School para recolectar juguetes.

Sepúlveda donará los juguetes a estudiantes con necesidades especiales en Pinkston High School. Santa estará presente para ayudar a entregar juguetes y hacerse fotos con los estudiantes de Pinkston.

Después, Sepúlveda entregará los otros juguetes a familias en el Buckner Center for Humanitarian Aid.

“Les digo a los estudiantes que han ayudado para que la colecta sea todo un éxito: no importa si es un juguete de $2 o $20, lo que importa es que provenga del corazón”, dijo Sepúlveda. “Es un sentimiento especial saber que has marcado una diferencia de alguna manera”.


Dallas ISD Racial Equity Office co-hosts Dallas History Hackathon






The Dallas ISD Racial Equity Office, Dallas Truth Racial Healing & Transformation, City of Dallas Office of Equity and Human Rights, and Dallas Public Library hosted Dallas ISD students from South Oak Cliff High School and Kimball High School for the first ever 2018 Dallas History Hackathon.

Dallas History and Archives Division of the Dallas Public Library, Remembering Black Dallas and Dallas Mexican American Historical League gave interactive presentations that allowed students to interact with historical text and artifacts. Students were paired with community members from those organizations to edit selected Wikipedia pages to begin the process of highlighting Dallas historical figures that students and adults rarely, if ever, see in history books. This event is part of an ongoing exercise to introduce students and adults to underrepresented historical figures that need to be highlighted.
In an exciting surprise for students and adults that attended the hackathon, Trinidad “Trini” Garza, who was elected the first Hispanic member of the Dallas ISD Board of Trustees in 1969 and was appointed Deputy Regional Director of the U.S. Department of Education in President Clinton’s Administration, arrived and talked with students. Former Trustee Garza showing up as a real life historical figure solidified the importance of paying homage to living legends that paved the way in history.
This hackathon was the first of a series of hackathons that will engage students in a creative way of studying history. The Dallas ISD Racial Equity Office is thankful to the Dallas ISD Technology Department for providing the technology set up and ongoing support as they host a series of these events for the 2018 – 2019 school year.

Cofundadores de CityLab High School reciben Urban Design Award

Esta semana, los cofundadores de CityLab High School recibirán el Urban Design Award del Greater Dallas Planning Council por su visión y la fundación de la escuela.

Peter Goldstein y Lorena Toffer recibieron dicho reconocimiento el 4 de diciembre. Goldstein es un arquitecto con licencia e imparte clases en dicho campo en CityLab, a la vez que Toffer es arquitecta establecida en Dallas. CityLab abrió en el año escolar 2017-2018 en el Pegasus Building, a unas cuadras del ayuntamiento de Dallas y el corazón de la ciudad. La preparatoria utiliza la ciudad como laboratorio para estudiar la planificación urbana, las ciencias ambientales, arquitectura, entre otras cosas.

Los dos recibirán el Mark Goode Urban Pioneer Award, llamado así por el expresidente y miembro del Greater Dallas Planning Council quien falleció en noviembre.

Las escuelas y programas especializados, tales como CityLab, de Dallas ISD están aceptando solicitudes hasta el 31 de enero de 2019 para aquellos estudiantes que estén interesados. Visite, www.dallasisd.org/tusopciones para buscar la mejor escuela para su hijo


Centros proporcionan ayuda y recursos a padres

El Dallas ISD creó cinco centros llamados “ONE Center” donde los padres pueden recibir apoyo y recursos que les ayudará con la inscripción de su hijo en un plantel en su vecindario o una escuela especializada.

Además de proporcionar información, ayudarán a los padres a llenar una solicitud; administrar la lista de espera en las escuelas de opción; solicitar un traslado; recibir información sobre la asistencia para recibir uniformes escolares; solicitar un expediente académico y diplomas; y ofrecerán talleres para padres.

Dichos centros están ubicados de manera estratégica en el distrito y están abiertos de lunes a viernes, de 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m., en los siguientes sitios:

• Noroeste – Linus Wright Administration Building, 972-925-5550
• Noreste – Emmet J. Conrad High School, 972-925-5554
• Central – Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy, 972-925-5553
• Sureste – L. G. Pinkston High School, 972-925-5551
• Sureste – Turney W. Leonard Training Center, 972-925-5552

Para más información, visite dallasisd.org/one o envíe sus preguntas a enroll@dallasisd.org.


Dallas ISD Police Officer Ensures Every Child Gets A Present For Christmas

As someone who grew up without much money, Dallas ISD Police Officer Omar Sepulveda knows what it’s like to be a kid in a family that depends on donations for Christmas presents.

Sepulveda, who now serves as an officer at Pinkston High School, has a simple motto: “Every kid deserves a present on Christmas.” Sepulveda is in his fourth year of hosting a toy drive to make his mission come true.

Officer Sepulveda

“When I started this toy drive four Christmases ago, I thought, ‘I’m not rich, but I think I can make a difference,’” Sepulveda said. “I’m trying to give back to the community that provided for me when I was growing up.”

The toy drive has grown every year. Sepulveda and fellow officers spent part of their Monday using donations to buy more than $800 in Christmas presents from Walmart. He is also hosting an event starting at noon on Saturday, Dec. 8, at Pinkston High School to collect toys.

Sepulveda will donate the toys to students with special needs at Pinkston High School. Santa will be on hand to help give out the toys and take pictures the Pinkston students.

Sepulveda will then give out the other toys to families at the Buckner Center for Humanitarian Aid.

“I tell the students who have helped collect toys and make this successful: It doesn’t matter if it’s a $2 toy or $20 toy, it just matters that it comes from the heart,” Sepulveda said. “It’s a special feeling to know that you’ve made a difference in some way.”


Teachers sought for dual credential program

To support the district’s early college high school initiative, Texas A&M University has created a program to recruit and develop teachers who are certified to teach high school and college credit courses (dual credentialed teachers) in the following areas at the high school level: English, speech, government and psychology. The dual credentialing program is seeking teachers with a master’s degree in any area and at least a minimum of three years of high school teaching experience.

Those interested in the program should complete an interest form and attend one of the interest meetings to apply and interview for the program. The program is scheduled to begin Jan. 22, 2019.

  • 5-7:30 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 17, in the first floor conference room at the H.B. Bell Building, 2909 N Buckner Blvd
  • 5-7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 9, in Lab 62, Suite 1100, in the Linus D. Wright Dallas ISD Administration Building, 9400 N. Central Expressway.

For questions or additional information, contact Tiffany Gilmore at tigilmore@dallasisd.org or (972) 925-8915.


Celebration connects Toyota tutors with students they help

Volunteers from Toyota who are helping tutor Dallas ISD students via a computer throughout the school year met with the students face-to-face at a celebration in late November.

TutorMate is an online tutoring program that connects Toyota volunteers with students at J.N. Ervin Elementary School learning to read. Some Toyota employees also dropped off presents to the students at Ervin Elementary.

“The children were delighted to meet with their new tutors and the smiles on their faces were more than worth it,” said Tisha Barnett of Toyota Motors North America. “We are looking forward to another amazing season of helping these students along in their literacy journey.”


CityLab High School co-founders to receive Urban Design Award


The co-founders of Dallas ISD’s CityLab High School are being honored this week for their vision and creation of the school with an Urban Deign Award from the Greater Dallas Planning Council.

CityLab High School co-founders Lorena Toffer and Peter Goldstein are introduced to students on the school’s first day in August 2017.

Peter Goldstein and Lorena Toffer will be honored on Dec. 4, 2018. Goldstein teaches architecture at CityLab, while Toffer is an architect based in Dallas. CityLab opened for the 2017-2018 school year in the district’s Pegasus Building, a few blocks from the Dallas City Hall and the heart of downtown. The high school literally uses the city as a lab to study urban planning, environmental science, architecture and more.

The two are receiving the Mark Goode Urban Pioneer Award, named for the former Greater Dallas Planning Council president and board member who passed away in November.

Applications are being accepted now through Jan. 31, 2019, for the many Dallas ISD specialty schools and programs – such as CityLab – magnets and more for students in all grade levels. Find the school best for your child by starting at www.dallasisd.org/yourchoices.


Five central enrollment centers provide host of resources to parents

Dallas ISD has established five “ONE Centers” to provide a one-stop shop for parents to receive campus enrollment support and resources.

The ONE Centers are strategically located within the district’s networks and quadrant to provide comprehensive services and provide a simple experience for parents to enroll their students in neighborhood and choice schools.

Staff at the ONE Centers will provide information and assist parents with school choice application and application assistance; school choice wait-list management; student transfer request and information; school registration support; school uniform assistance; student transcript and diploma requests; and parent workshops.

The centers are open 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friday in the following locations:

  • Northwest – Linus Wright Administration Building, 972-925-5550
  • Northeast – Emmet J. Conrad High School, 972-925-5554
  • Central – Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy, 972-925-5553
  • Southwest – L. G. Pinkston High School, 972-925-5551
  • Southeast – Turney  W. Leonard Training Center, 972-925-5552

Find information at dallasisd.org/one. Email questions to enroll@dallasisd.org.


Nomine a alumnos de kinder para programa Gifted and Talented de Dallas ISD

El Distrito Escolar Independiente de Dallas estará aceptando nominaciones para que los alumnos sean evaluados para el Gifted and Talented Program (programa para talentosos y dotados).  Los alumnos que actualmente están inscritos en kínder en Dallas ISD pueden ser nominados.

Los padres, tutores legales, miembros de la comunidad o el personal de la escuela pueden comunicarse con el maestro del Gifted and Talented Program de la escuela local para obtener un paquete de información para nominar a los alumnos y que puedan ser considerados. Los alumnos deben estar inscritos en Dallas ISD para ser evaluados.

El período de nominación comienza el 3 de diciembre de 2018 y concluye el 14 de diciembre de 2018.


Nominate a kindergarten student for Dallas ISD Gifted and Talented program

Dallas ISD is now accepting nominations for kindergarten students currently enrolled in the district to be screened for the Gifted and Talented program.

Parents, guardians, community members, or campus staff may nominate students for consideration by contacting the Gifted and Talented Elementary Program teacher at the local school campus to obtain an information packet.  Students must be enrolled in Dallas ISD to be tested.

The nomination window runs Dec. 3–14.


Harder drive, sharper focus push South Oak Cliff’s football team

When it was time for the football team to run practice drills, the South Oak Cliff (SOC) High School team couldn’t hustle out to the field behind their school.

That’s because since January 2018, the school has been housed at Dallas ISD’s Village Fair facility while the original campus is being renovated and expanded a few miles away. There’s no space for practice, so the team has been bused to one of six district stadiums to prepare.

But that logistical hurdle hasn’t slowed a team that has defeated all 11 of its opponents on the field so far. They face Aledo High School – also unbeaten – at 7:30 tonight in a Class 5A Division II Region II semifinal to be played at Midlothian ISD Stadium.

When the team heads to tonight’s game, the SOC team will trade the school bus it rode to practices for a luxury charter bus paid for by SOC alumni.

In 2017, SOC got knocked out of the playoffs in the second round. The team has already surpassed that success, but aren’t done just yet. What has been the difference?

“We grew up,” said Davion Wheeler, a senior defensive end. “Also, good coaching. We do everything our coaches tell us to do, we execute and we get the job done.”

Fellow defensive end Steven Parker, also a senior, agreed. “We worked much harder than we had,” he said. “We’re just more focused.”

Head coach Jason Todd said the travel for practices led to some late nights. But they haven’t deterred the team, and his senior players especially want to end their high school careers on top.

“With the senior class, this is their last time,” Todd said. “They just have to lay it all on the line.” In three weeks, the Texas high school season will be over for everyone. “We just have to keep pushing.”

Being the last Dallas ISD team in the playoffs has some benefits.

Community liaison Derrick Battie said staff and players from Carter, Kimball and Roosevelt are planning to fill the stands to support SOC.

“We are all Oak Cliff,” he said.

Battie credits  the school’s male mentor program as another driving factor. It has helped students make better, positive choices and the benefits are showing academically and athletically at SOC.


Recomendamos a estudiantes de 12º grado completar la solicitud FAFSA antes del 15 de enero

Para obtener prioridad, los estudiantes de 12º grado deben llenar la Solicitud Gratuita de Ayuda Federal para Estudiantes (FAFSA, por sus siglas en inglés) antes del 15 de enero de 2019. La solicitud ayuda a estudiantes calificar para ayuda financiera para pagar para la universidad o colegio técnico.

Los estudiantes que solicitarán ayuda financiera por medio de FAFSA deben hacerlo lo antes posible. Cada institución educativa tiene diferentes plazos para aceptar ayuda financiera, y la fecha límite del gobierno federal es el 30 de junio de 2019. Por medio de FAFSA, los estudiantes pueden solicitar tres tipos de ayuda financiera: subvenciones, empleo de medio tiempo en la universidad o prestamos con una tasa de interés baja. Toda la información sobre la ayuda y la solicitud esta disponible haciendo clic aquí.

También existe una aplicación nueva, myStudentAid, que permite a estudiantes llenar la solicitud desde un celular con un sistema operativo Android o iOS. Asimismo, los estudiantes de Dallas ISD tienen la opción del Dallas County Promise Pledge.

Los estudiantes que se graduarán en 2019 deben llenar la solicitud para dicho programa antes del 8 de febrero para tener la oportunidad de que se les cubra su colegiatura en las universidades y colegios comunitarios participantes, y apoyo de un consejero que les ayudará a lograr el éxito académico. Para más información sobre diferentes opciones de ayuda financiera disponibles, haga clic aquí.

Les compartimos una lista de consejos para completar correctamente la FAFSA que ha reunido Houston ISD:

1. Completar la solicitud FAFSA no cuesta nada (de ahí su nombre, Solicitud GRATUITA de Ayuda Federal para Estudiantes).

2. Antes de enviar la solicitud, debes crear una identificación de FSA, que sirve como tu firma electrónica. Usarás la misma identificación cada año. Tu padre o madre también necesitará una. Consejo: Si tu hermano mayor solicitó ayuda el año pasado, uno de tus padres ya tiene una identificación FSA.

3. Tendrás que completar la solicitud cada año que asistas a la universidad para poder seguir recibiendo la asistencia.

4. Entre más pronto envíes tu FAFSA, mejor. Los premios Texas Grant Awards son limitados, especialmente si solicitas después del 1 de marzo.

5. Para la beca Pell Grant, puedes presentar la solicitud el día antes de empezar la universidad, pero no recibirás ayuda económica hasta octubre. Esto significa que tendrás que pagar de tu bolsillo, hasta que recibas un cheque de reembolso.

6. Por ley los estudiantes varones deben registrarse en el Servicio Selectivo para recibir ayuda federal.

7. Toda la ayuda federal, incluyendo los préstamos, subvenciones y trabajo de medio tiempo en la universidad, requiere una solicitud FAFSA.

8. Aquellos con padres que tienen altos ingresos pueden calificar para algún tipo de ayuda, especialmente la ayuda institucional. Presenta tu solicitud FAFSA incluso si crees que tus padres ganan demasiado dinero.

9. El premio máximo de la beca Pell Grant es de $6,095 dólares. Recuerda que una subvención es dinero GRATUITO, sin condiciones. Seis mil dólares cubrirán clases, libros y algo de dinero para gastos en un Houston Community College.

10. FAFSA ahora usa datos de impuestos de dos años atrás. Los estudiantes que se inscriban en el otoño de 2019 utilizarán los datos de impuestos de 2017.


Seven teachers receive 2018 Texas Instruments Foundation awards












Seven Dallas ISD teachers were recognized on Wednesday, Nov. 28, for being selected for 2018 Texas Instruments Innovations in STEM Teaching Awards. Each receives $10,000 to divide equally between their classrooms and themselves.

STEM is shorthand for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

The 2018 Dallas ISD recipients are:

  • Grant Ashmore, Bryan Adams High School
  • Donielle Edwards-Tyeskie, Trinidad Garza Early College High School
  • Arelthia Phillips, Innovation, Design, Entrepreneurship Academy
  • Sara Ramirez, STEM Environmental Education Center
  • Andrew Sobinvosky, Dallas Environmental Science Academy
  • Ashley Steele, Henry Longfellow Career Exploration Academy
  • Brent Voorhees, Skyline High School

Superintendent Michael Hinojosa said there are two Dallas ISD programs that the district leads nationally, but does not always get due recognition for. One is dual-language and the other is STEM. Both are programs he said he brags about when giving speeches throughout the country.

“I think we are best-in-class, especially for a big urban district,” he said. “And the fact that we’re honoring you, the best of the best, in the best-in-class program in the country, is really meaningful.”

Terri West, chairwoman of the TI Foundation board, said that since the awards program began 12 years ago, nearly $2 million has been awarded to teachers in six Dallas-area school districts. There have been 74 Dallas ISD teachers, including the 2018 winners, who have received a total of $865,000 in awards.

West said education is the top priority of the TI Foundation’s philanthropy, specifically STEM education.

“Certainly part of it is for selfish reasons because science, technology, engineering and math are really important to TI,” West said. “But also we understand at the foundation what a STEM background – a STEM education – can do for a student. It truly can change a student’s life.”

West said a basis in STEM can boost a student’s earning potential but also give them the chance to spend their careers working on rewarding and exciting projects.

“We are so delighted to support a strong STEM program in our own back yard,” she said. “Congratulations to the winners, and more importantly, thank you for what you do. It makes a great deal to your students.”

Oswaldo Alvarenga, Executive Director of Dallas ISD’s STEM Department, listed the requirements to be considered for the TI award.

Candidates have to teach a STEM-related subject at the secondary level, be eligible for Distinguished Teacher Review in the previous school year, be nominated by their school’s principal, fill out an application and be subjected to a classroom visit.

“So it was a very rigorous process,” Alvarenga said. “After all the numbers were added up, this is how we came down to our seven.”


Fechas importantes restantes en el año escolar 2018-19 en Dallas ISD

El año escolar se acerca al punto intermedio, por lo que queremos resaltar fechas importantes que aún quedan en el calendario académico de 2018-19 de Dallas ISD.

* Vacaciones de invierno: 20 de dic. – 8 de ene. (estudiantes), 21 de dic. – 4 de ene. (personal)

* Receso de primavera (Spring Break): 11-15 de marzo

* Días feriados para estudiantes y maestros: 21 de ene., 18 de feb., 27 de mayo

* Días para reponer tiempo perdido por mal tiempo: 19 y 22 de abril Para ver el calendario en formato PDF, visite www.dallasisd.org/calendars.


South Oak Cliff High School avanza a semifinal regional en fútbol americano

South Oak Cliff High School es la última preparatoria de Dallas ISD que aún está compitiendo en fútbol americano este año.

Los Golden Bears se enfrentarán a los Bearcats de Aledo High School el viernes, 30 de noviembre, a las 7:30 p.m., en Midlothian ISD Stadium. Ambos equipos están invictos, South Oak Cliff cuenta con un récord de 11-0 y Aledo registra una marca de 12-0.

SOC avanzó después de vencer a Frisco High School, 48-16, el pasado viernes, 23 de noviembre, en el Ford Center at the Star de dicha ciudad.

Si desea apoyar al equipo en el Midlothian ISD Stadium, este está ubicado en el 1800 S. 14th St, en Midlothian, Texas 76065. Para direcciones hacia el estado puede hacer clic aquí.


¡Le ayudamos a presentar solicitud para sus hijos para una escuela especializada de Dallas ISD!

Una manera de ayudar a los estudiantes a prepararse para un futuro exitoso es exponerlos a programas innovadores y con especialidades. El Dallas ISD ofrece una variedad de oportunidades que los estudiantes pueden explorar.

Algunos de los programas especializados que ofrece Dallas ISD, incluyen:

  • Escuelas para varones
  • Escuelas para niñas/jóvenes
  • Academias Universitarias
  • Escuelas de humanidades, comunicación, y liderazgo
  • Escuelas con programa de Bachillerato Internacional
  • Escuelas Magnet
  • Escuelas Montessori
  • Escuelas con aprendizaje personalizado
  • Escuelas con aprendizaje basado en proyectos y programas de planificación urbana, arquitectura y diseño
  • Escuelas con programas de STEM/STEAM
  • Escuelas con programa de lenguaje dual bilateral

Sabemos que el proceso de solicitud puede ser confuso. Por ello durante diciembre y enero estaremos llevando a cabo talleres para ayudarles a completar la solicitud de su hijo.

Los talleres de diciembre serán de 6 a 8 p.m., en las siguientes fechas:

  • Martes, 4 de diciembre: Sudie Williams Talented and Gifted, 4518 Pomona Rd.
  • Jueves, 6 de diciembre: School for the Talented and Gifted in Pleasant Grove, 9610 Bruton Rd.
  • Martes, 11 de diciembre: Lincoln Humanities and Communications Magnet High School, 2826 Elsie Faye Heggins St.
  • Jueves, 13 de diciembre: Emmett J. Conrad High School, 7502 Fair Oaks Ave.

Los talleres de enero 2019 serán también de 6 a 8 p.m. en:

  • Jueves, 10 de enero: Wilmer-Hutchins High School, 5520 Langdon Rd.
  • Miércoles, 16 de enero: T. White High School, 4505 Ridgeside Dr.
  • Martes, 22 de enero: Solar Preparatory School for Boys at John F. Kennedy Learning Center, 1802 Moser Ave.
  • Jueves, 24 de enero: Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy, 1700 E. Camp Wisdom Rd.
  • Martes, 29 de enero:H. Adamson High School, 308 E. Ninth St.

Habrá representantes para ayudarlos a llenar la solicitud de admisión allí mismo, además de contestarles cualquier duda que tengan. Hay ciertos programas que requieren documentos o información específica. Visite dallasisd.org/tusopciones para verificar todo lo necesario para completar solicitud en las escuelas que les interesan a sus hijos.


Dallas ISD Rising: Relationships key to C.F. Carr Elementary’s success








The silence in the hallway is shattered by enthusiastic chanting and singing as a class at C.F. Carr Elementary School prepares for another day of learning.

Students are having fun before tackling the work of the day. Principal Carlotta Hooks, in her second year at Carr, said that strategy is just one teachers are using to engage students and build genuine relationships with them to foster an environment that expects and rewards academic success.

Carr is one of 13 Dallas ISD schools with improvements significant enough to remove it from the state’s list of low-performing campuses. Some of those 13 improving schools, including Carr, are part of the district’s Accelerating Campus Excellence (ACE) program, which pays incentives to high-performing educators to draw them to schools that need them the most.

A preliminary plan last year would have closed Carr and consolidated its student population at another district school. The school’s success shut down that plan.

“Our staff was dedicated to giving the students a new start, and showing the kids they believe in them,” Hooks said.

Strategic structure

Academic systems are now in place that let students automatically know the expectations each day. For example, students arrive knowing they will work a “Math Problem of the Day” that is aligned with the curriculum and state requirements.

In language arts, students know they will be writing about the novel they are studying. The continual writing assignments are designed to help students become better readers.

“Kids have real books in their hands,” Hooks said. “They understand that reading changes everything. They are writing every day, and writing with a purpose.”

Teachers also give instant feedback to individual students in class. She said that is important because correcting mistakes when work is in progress can more effectively teach the students and eliminates errors moving forward.

Community and parental support is also gaining strength. Volunteers from Mercy Street are at the school every day and some from Trinity Christian Academy volunteer at the school once a month.

Hooks, an avid gardener, has introduced her passion for plants to students, who enjoy helping water and maintain the school garden. There are other new opportunities for students beyond the classroom, including an after-school basketball program coordinated by a volunteer who offered to bring the game to Carr.

“We get a lot of blessings, just out of the blue,” Hooks said.

Charting changes

Karla Johnson-Ritchwood knows how Carr has changed. She teaches 5th– and 6th-grade Reading and has been at Carr the past 11 years. In fact, she is the only teacher to remain after Carr became an ACE campus.

She also points to strong teacher-student relationships as a driving factor.

“The students know the teachers actually care,” Johnson-Ritchwood said. “Teachers are here because they want to be here. The kids know that.”

District administration has provided resources teachers need to succeed, she said, and while there is a lot of pressure on the staff and students to succeed, it’s worth the effort.

“I’m loving it,” she said. “I know everybody expected us to fail. We knew we were going to prove them wrong, and we did it.”


Dieciséis estudiantes avanzan a semifinal del concurso de oratoria MLK Jr.

Dieciséis estudiantes avanzaron a la ronda de semifinales del 27º concurso anual de oratoria Martin Luther King Jr., presentado por la firma de abogados Gardere.

El martes, 4 de diciembre, a las 6 p.m., en North Dallas High School, competirán los 16 estudiantes, que quedaron en primer lugar en las competiciones en su escuela, para determinar a los ocho finalistas.

Los estudiantes de las escuelas participantes del Dallas ISD escribieron sus propios discursos basándose en el tema de este año: ¿Qué les diría el Dr. King a los niños de hoy? Sus discursos serán calificados según la calidad de la redacción y la presentación.

Los semifinalistas son (en ningún orden particular):

• Joselyn Torres, Arcadia Park Elementary School
• Tynia Matts, John Neely Bryan Elementary School
• Priscilla Delgado, Frederick Douglass Elementary School
• Jakorian Jackson, Paul L. Dunbar Learning Center
• Jada Wilson, L.L. Hotchkiss Elementary School
• Jeremiah Wilson, T.L. Marsalis Elementary School
• Donovan Domínguez, Eladio Martínez Elementary School
• Layla Johnson, Ronald McNair Elementary School
• Jasira King, William B. Miller Elementary School
• Tory Robertson, Jr., Clara Oliver Elementary School
• Kaiya Hudson, Charles Rice Learning Center
• Kimberli Rouwtt, J.P. Starks Elementary School
• Ayleen Morales, Thomas Tolbert Elementary School
• Raeann Lowe, Urban Park Elementary School
• Alexandra Torres, Wilmer-Hutchins Elementary School
• Presley Rivers, Harry C. Withers Elementary School


Is your child applying to one of Dallas ISD’s specialty schools? Let us help

We know the application process for Dallas ISD’s specialty schools can get confusing. So we’re holding nine specialty school application workshops to help make the process a little less stressful.

All workshops are from 6-8 PM.

DECEMBER WORKSHOPS:

Tuesday, Dec. 4 | Sudie Williams Talented and Gifted | 4518 Pomona Rd. | 75209

Thursday, Dec. 6  |  School for the Talented and Gifted in Pleasant Grove | 9610 Bruton Rd. | 75217

Tuesday, Dec. 11 | Lincoln Humanities and Communications Magnet High School | 2826 Elsie Faye Heggins St. | 75215

Thursday, Dec. 13 | Emmett J. Conrad High School | 7502 Fair Oaks Ave. |  75231

JANUARY WORKSHOPS:

Thursday, Jan. 10 | Wilmer-Hutchins High School | 5520 Langdon Rd. | 75241

Wednesday, Jan. 16  | W.T. White High School  | 4505 Ridgeside Dr. | 75244

Tuesday, Jan. 22 | Solar Preparatory School for Boys at John F. Kennedy Learning Center | 1802 Moser Ave. | 75206

Thursday, Jan. 24 | Kathlyn Joy Gilliam Collegiate Academy | 1700 E. Camp Wisdom Rd. | 75241

Tuesday, Jan. 29 | W.H. Adamson High School | 308 E. Ninth St. | 75203

Dallas ISD’s specialty schools include:

  • All-Boys Schools
  • All-Girls Schools
  • Collegiate Academies
  • Humanities, Communication, and Leadership Schools
  • International Baccalaureate Schools
  • Magnet Schools
  • Montessori Schools
  • Personalized Learning Schools
  • Project Based Learning, Urban Planning, Architecture & Design Schools
  • STEM/STEAM Schools
  • Two-Way Dual Language Schools

You can fill out the application on-site, and representatives will be on-hand to answer questions and help with the process. Certain programs require specific paperwork or information, including a report card, proof of residence or household income. To make sure you have all of the information to complete the applications for the schools your child is interested in, please visit www.dallasisd.org/yourchoices.


Seniors encouraged to apply for FAFSA now to beat Jan. 15 deadline

For priority consideration, high school seniors must submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by Jan. 15, 2019. The application makes students eligible for financial assistance to pay for college or career school.

Students planning to apply for financial aid through FAFSA are encouraged to do so as soon as possible. Schools have various deadlines for accepting aid, and the federal deadline is June 30, 2019. FAFSA lets students apply for three types of financial assistance: grants, work-study funds and low-interest loans. Information and the online application is available here.

A new app, myStudentAid, allows students to apply directly from Android and iOS phones.

Additionally, the Dallas County Promise Pledge is also available for Dallas ISD students. Class of 2019 seniors must pledge by Feb. 8 to be eligible for free tuition and success coaching at participating colleges. Learn more about financial aid options available to Dallas ISD students here.

Houston ISD has a great list of 10 FAFSA tips below:

  1. Completing the FAFSA doesn’t cost you ANYTHING (hence the name, FREE Application for Federal Student Aid).
  2. Prior to submitting a FAFSA, you must create an FSA ID, which serves as your e-signature. You’ll use the same one each year. You’ll need one for a parent. Tip: if your older sibling applied for a FAFSA last year, guess what? One of your parents already has an FSA ID.
  3. You need to complete the FAFSA each year you attend school in order to keep receiving your award.
  4. The earlier you submit your FAFSA, the better. Texas Grant Awards are limited, especially if you apply after March 1.
  5. For the Pell Grant, you can apply the day before your start college, but you won’t receive your financial aid until October. That means you pay out of pocket until you get a refund check.
  6. Male students must register with Selective Service in order to be eligible for federal student aid. Why? Because it’s the law.
  7. All federal aid, including loans, grants, and work-study, requires a FAFSA on file.
  8. High earners may qualify for some form of aid, especially institutional aid. Submit a FAFSA even if you think your parents make too much money.
  9. Remember a grant is FREE money – no strings attached. For example, the maximum Pell Grant award is $6,095.
  10. FAFSA now uses “prior, prior year” tax data. Students enrolling in Fall 2019 will use 2017 tax data.

South Oak Cliff football team advances to regional semifinal

South Oak Cliff High School is the last Dallas ISD team standing in this year’s football playoffs.

The Golden Bears will face the Aledo Bearcats at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30, at Midlothian ISD Stadium in a Class 5A Division II Region II semifinal. Both teams are undefeated, with SOC posting an 11-0 record this season and Aledo with 12-0.

SOC advances after defeating Frisco, 48-16, in a 5A Division II Region II area round playoff on Friday, Nov. 23, at the Star in Frisco’s Ford Center.

For those traveling to this Friday’s regional semifinal, the stadium is located at 1800 S 14th St, Midlothian, Texas 76065. Find online map directions here


Thanksgiving a great time to practice habits of gratitude, show thanks

As we approach the Thanksgiving holiday, we want to encourage all of our students, Dallas ISD staff members and families to make time for gratitude.  The habit of gratitude and appreciating important aspects of our lives are closely linked with Social and Emotional Learning, especially the competencies of Self-Awareness and Relationship Skills.

As you reflect on the positive aspects of your life (family, friends, safety, health, etc.), be sure to pass it on and share that gratitude by:

  • Writing a thank you note to a friend, neighbor, or colleague who has helped you
  • Taking time in a staff meeting to verbally share thanks to team members or write appreciation notes
  • Calling a long-distance friend or family member to let them know that you’re thinking about them and value their support
  • Running an errand for someone or bringing a small item for them as a favor (coffee, favorite snack, etc.)

We wish all of our Dallas community members happiness, health, and quality time with loved ones during this season of gratitude!


Antigua escuela primaria reabre como centro para jóvenes sin hogar










Hace un año, se anunció un plan para convertir Fannie C. Harris Elementary School en un centro para jóvenes que con el tiempo, acogerá a estudiantes de Dallas ISD que no tienen donde quedarse durante la noche.

El martes, 13 de noviembre, se llevó a cabo una ceremonia especial y un corte de listón para celebrar el trabajo realizado hasta el momento en preparación para la apertura del centro que será en unas semanas.

En un principio, el Fannie C. Harris Youth Center estará abierto después de clases para que los estudiantes sin hogar tengan un lugar seguro para pasar un rato, hacer tarea, y poder bañarse y lavar ropa. En la primavera, cuando se concluyan las reformas, se tiene planeado que el centro comience a operar el servicio para la noche con capacidad para 35 estudiantes.

El centro lo operará After8toEducate, un esfuerzo colaborativo formado a través de Social Venture Partners Dallas. Dicha colaboración reúne a Dallas ISD, Promise House y CitySquare para proporcionar servicios básicos a estudiantes del distrito y otros jóvenes de 14 a 21 años de edad sin hogar. Para más información, visite www.after8toeducate.com.


Escuelas con la mejor asistencia en septiembre reciben estandarte









En septiembre, el Departamento para la Mejora de Asistencia Escolar y Reducción de Ausentismo de Dallas ISD llevó a cabo un concurso para celebrar el Mes de Concientización sobre la Asistencia Escolar.

El concurso retó a las escuelas a tener la mejor asistencia en general y el mayor número de estudiantes con asistencia perfecta durante septiembre. También, se realizó la campaña “Show Up”, un esfuerzo para motivar a los estudiantes a no tener más de cinco faltas durante el año escolar.

Ganadores por Distrito

Escuelas con la mejor asistencia en general:

• Distrito 1: John J. Pershing Elementary School
• Distrito 2: Sudie Williams Talented & Gifted Academy
• Distrito 3: Charles A. Gill Elementary School
• Distrito 4: Pleasant Grove Elementary School
• Distrito 5: Lorenzo De Zavala Elementary School
• Distrito 6: Robert L. Thornton Elementary School
• Distrito 7: L.O. Donald Elementary School
• Distrito 8: Alex W. Spence Talented/Gifted Academy
• Distrito 9: Skyline High School

Primer lugar, asistencia perfecta de los estudiantes:

• Distrito 1: George H.W. Bush Elementary School
• Distrito 2: Dan D. Rogers Elementary School
• Distrito 3: Casa View Elementary School
• Distrito 4: Edward Titche Elementary School
• Distrito 5: William B. Travis Vanguard for the Academically Talented and Gifted
• Distrito 6: Thomas L. Marsalis Elementary School
• Distrito 7: Stevens Park Elementary School
• Distrito 8: Maple Lawn Elementary School
• Distrito 9: Félix G. Botello Elementary School

Segundo lugar, asistencia perfecta de los estudiantes:

• Distrito 1: Anne Frank Elementary School
• Distrito 2: Geneva Heights Elementary School
• Distrito 3: Robert T. Hill Middle School
• Distrito 4: William A. Anderson Elementary School
• Distrito 5: Dr. Wright L. Lassiter Jr. Early College High School
• Distrito 6: Umphrey Lee Elementary School
• Distrito 7: Rosemont Elementary School
• Distrito 8: Mount Auburn Elementary School
• Distrito 9: Henry B. González Elementary School

La ganadora de la campaña en redes sociales fue Larry G. Smith Elementary School.


Fearlessness earns Carter cheerleader all-expense-paid trip to NYC for Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade

Carter High School cheerleader Erica Richardson’s natural-born ability as a daredevil has earned her an all-expenses-paid trip to New York City to be a part of the legendary Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.

Richardson completed her first back handspring at the age of 8 by jumping up and throwing her legs behind her head. Her fearlessness and ability led her to gymnastics and, later in life, to earning the captain role on the David W. Carter High School cheerleading squad, where she is often seen tumbling along the sidelines.

“I’ve always loved trying new things, and I have no fear or hesitation about going for it,” Richardson said.

Richardson was selected at a Dallas ISD cheer camp as the top female cheerleader, earning her the trip to New York City for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Her mom, Kimberly Richardson, who is principal at Thomas L. Marsalis Elementary School, her brother and Carter cheer coach Lachon Jacobs will join her on the trip.

“I am thrilled for this trip to New York City, and I am so proud of Erica,” Jacobs said. “Erica has always had a star quality because she’s never been scared to set the example.”

In New York City, Richardson will practice for several hours every day, but she will also have time to attend a Broadway show, visit the One World Trade Center, and tour other parts of the Big Apple.

“I’ve been excited for this trip for months, and I can’t believe it’s almost here,” Richardson said. “I am thrilled at the opportunity to represent Dallas ISD in this parade.”


District sets $150,000 goal in 2018 United Way workplace campaign

Scores of nonprofits and agencies in our community depend on United Way funding to provide programs and services that help Dallas ISD students and families. That’s why Dallas ISD supports United Way and encourages employees to contribute via its annual workplace campaign. The district’s 2018 giving goal is $150,000, and the campaign runs through Dec. 14.

The theme of this year’s district campaign, is “This is Us.”

There are multiple ways for employees to contribute, and when you give you can specify your donation to support one or more of 150 United Way organizations. You can find the list of these organizations, view a dashboard that tracks department and school giving in real time, and download a variety of campaign resources from the district’s United Way webpage, www.dallasisd.org/unitedway.


Schools with best attendance in September are honored with banners









Dallas ISD’s Attendance Improvement and Truancy Reduction celebrated Attendance Awareness Month in September with a contest.

The”Show Up” campaign urges students to have no more than five absences each school year. The contest challenged schools to have the best overall attendance and have as many of their students have perfect attendance for the month of September.

Trustee Champion School Winners, which had the highest overall attendance, are:

• District 1: John J. Pershing Elementary School
• District 2: Sudie Williams Talented & Gifted Academy
• District 3: Charles A. Gill Elementary School
• District 4: Pleasant Grove Elementary School
• District 5: Lorenzo De Zavala Elementary School
• District 6: Robert L. Thornton Elementary School
• District 7: L.O. Donald Elementary School
• District 8: Alex W. Spence Talented/Gifted Academy
• District 9: Skyline High School

First Place Student Perfect Attendance winners are:

• District 1: George H.W. Bush Elementary School
• District 2: Dan D. Rogers Elementary School
• District 3: Casa View Elementary School
• District 4: Edward Titche Elementary School
• District 5: William B. Travis Vanguard for the Academically Talented and Gifted
• District 6: Thomas L. Marsalis Elementary School
• District 7: Stevens Park Elementary School
• District 8: Maple Lawn Elementary School
• District 9: Felix G. Botello Elementary School

Second Place Student Perfect Attendance winners are:

• District 1: Anne Frank Elementary School
• District 2: Geneva Heights Elementary School
• District 3: Robert T. Hill Middle School
• District 4: William A. Anderson Elementary School
• District 5: Dr. Wright L. Lassiter Jr. Early College High School
• District 6: Umphrey Lee Elementary School
• District 7: Rosemont Elementary School
• District 8: Mount Auburn Elementary School
• District 9: Henry B. Gonzalez Elementary School

The #ShowUpDallasISD Social Media winner is Larry G. Smith Elementary School.


Alimentos gratis durante semana de Acción de Gracias

El departamento de Food and Child Nutrition Services del Dallas ISD ofrecerá alimentos gratis a estudiantes durante la semana de vacaciones de Acción de Gracias.

El programa tiene como objetivo el proveer alimentos nutritivos a estudiantes, aún durante sus vacaciones.


Entre el lunes, 19 de noviembre y el miércoles, 21, escuelas participantes servirán un aperitivo de la mañana entre las 8 y 9 a.m. y comida entre las 11 a.m. y 12 p.m.


Para la lista de escuelas participantes, visite: 
www.dallasisd.org/fcns.

Alimentos gratis durante semana de Acción de Gracias

El departamento de Food and Child Nutrition Services del Dallas ISD ofrecerá alimentos gratis a estudiantes durante la semana de vacaciones de Acción de Gracias.

El programa tiene como objetivo el proveer alimentos nutritivos a estudiantes, aún durante sus vacaciones.


Entre el lunes, 19 de noviembre y el miércoles, 21, escuelas participantes servirán un aperitivo de la mañana entre las 8 y 9 a.m. y comida entre las 11 a.m. y 12 p.m.


Para la lista de escuelas participantes, visite: 
www.dallasisd.org/fcns.

Former elementary school reopens as a youth center for homeless students












A year ago, plans were announced to turn the vacant Fannie C. Harris Elementary School into a youth center that will eventually accommodate homeless Dallas ISD students who have nowhere else to stay at night.

Initially, the Fannie C. Harris Youth Center will open as an after-hours drop-in center for homeless youth to have a safe place to hang out, do homework and have access to laundry and shower facilities. In the spring, with further renovations, the center is planned to open its overnight component for up to 35 unaccompanied, unsheltered students.

The center will be operated by After8toEducate, a collaborative effort formed through the Social Venture partners Dallas. The collaboration brings together Dallas ISD, Promise House and CitySquare to provide essential services for district students and other homeless youth ages 14-21. Learn more at www.after8toeducate.com.


Skyline donation brings enough furniture to fill 16 trucks

After donating enough desks, chairs, conference tables and lamps to fill 16 trucks to Skyline High School, the leadership of Occidental Chemical Corporation (OxyChem) toured the country’s first magnet high school on Monday.

While touring the school, OxyChem President B.J. Hebert said he was impressed by the many different types of classes and programs offered at Skyline High School. He said he immediately thought of Skyline High School when OxyChem had excess furniture to donate after moving to a new office.

“We believe it’s critical to partner with and support schools such as Skyline High School since they are educating the leaders of tomorrow,” Hebert said. “We look forward to building on this partnership with Skyline.”

Skyline High School Principal Janice Lombardi said partnerships with businesses such as OxyChem bring a big benefit to the campus.

“Having leaders from the business community come into our school makes a big impression on our students,” Lombardi said. “Plus, this donation has really brightened up our teacher rooms, offices and classrooms.”


Skyline donation brings enough furniture to fill 16 trucks

After donating enough desks, chairs, conference tables and lamps to fill 16 trucks to Skyline High School, the leadership of Occidental Chemical Corporation (OxyChem) toured the country’s first magnet high school on Monday.

While touring the school, OxyChem President B.J. Hebert said he was impressed by the many different types of classes and programs offered at Skyline High School. He said he immediately thought of Skyline High School when OxyChem had excess furniture to donate after moving to a new office.

“We believe it’s critical to partner with and support schools such as Skyline High School since they are educating the leaders of tomorrow,” Hebert said. “We look forward to building on this partnership with Skyline.”

Skyline High School Principal Janice Lombardi said partnerships with businesses such as OxyChem bring a big benefit to the campus.

“Having leaders from the business community come into our school makes a big impression on our students,” Lombardi said. “Plus, this donation has really brightened up our teacher rooms, offices and classrooms.”


Dallas ISD schools to offer free meals over Thanksgiving Break

Dallas ISD’s Food and Child Nutrition Services Department will offer students free meals during the Thanksgiving break, from Monday, Nov. 19, through Wednesday, Nov 21.

The effort is to ensure students have access to nutritious meals even during breaks from school.

Participating schools throughout the district will be serving morning snack from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. and lunch from 11 a.m. to noon.

For a list of participating schools, go here


Important remaining dates in the Dallas ISD 2018-19 calendar

With the school year getting close to the halfway mark, here are the important remaining dates in the Dallas ISD 2018-19 calendar.

  • Dallas ISD Thanksgiving Break: Nov. 19–23
  • Dallas ISD Winter Break: Dec. 20–Jan. 8 (students), Dec. 21–Jan. 4 (staff)
  • Dallas ISD Spring Break: March 11–15
  • Student/Staff Holidays: Jan. 21, Feb. 18, May 27
  • Inclement Weather Makeup Dates: April 19 and 22

A pdf of the 2018–2019 approved school year calendar is available from www.dallasisd.org/calendars.


Sixteen students advance to semifinals of Gardere MLK Jr. Oratory competition

Sixteen students have advanced to the semifinal round of the 27th annual Gardere Martin Luther King Jr. Oratory Competition.

The 16 placed first at their campus contests and will compete to determine the eight finalists starting at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, at North Dallas High School.

Students at participating Dallas ISD schools wrote their own speeches based on this year’s theme, “What would Dr. King say to children of today’s world?” Their speeches are judged on their writing and delivery.

The semifinalists are (in no particular order)

  • Joselyn Torres, Arcadia Park Elementary School
  • Tynia Matts, John Neely Bryan Elementary School
  • Priscilla Delgado, Frederick Douglass Elementary School
  • Jakorian Jackson, Paul L. Dunbar Learning Center
  • Jada Wilson, L.L. Hotchkiss Elementary School
  • Jeremiah Wilson, T.L. Marsalis Elementary School
  • Donovan Dominguez, Eladio Martinez Elementary School
  • Layla Johnson, Ronald McNair Elementary School
  • Jasira King, William B. Miller Elementary School
  • Tory Robertson, Jr., Clara Oliver Elementary School
  • Kaiya Hudson, Charles Rice Learning Center
  • Kimberli Rouwtt, J.P. Starks Elementary School
  • Ayleen Morales, Thomas Tolbert Elementary School
  • Raeann Lowe, Urban Park Elementary School
  • Alexandra Torres, Wilmer-Hutchins Elementary School
  • Presley Rivers, Harry C. Withers Elementary School

Escuelas de Dallas ISD conmemoran el Día de Veteranos

En reconocimiento del Día de Veteranos, el lunes, las escuelas de Dallas ISD diversas ceremonias para reconocer su servicio a nuestro país.

Entre tanto, los administradores del distrito agradecieron a los cientos de empleados del distrito que son veteranos por mostrar la misma entrega y dedicación ahora que laboran en el distrito.

En Skyline High School comenzaron el día con un saludo e izando las banderas de Estados Unidos y Texas, y el JROTC homenajeó a los veteranos manteniéndose de pie bajo la fría lluvia.

El Cuerpo de Cadetes de Liderazgo (LCC) de Thomas C. Marsh Preparatory Academy participó en un evento especial en conmemoración del Día de Veteranos como parte de la noche informativa de la escuela. El LCC Military Museum ha estado abierto para que la comunidad lo recorra y en el salón del LCC se realizó una recepción para homenajear a los veteranos.

En el ayuntamiento de Dallas, los ganadores del Concurso de Arte del Día de Veteranos recibieron un reconocimiento por su trabajo de arte conmemorando los 100 años del armisticio que puso fin a la Primera Guerra Mundial. En Estados Unidos, dicho día se convertiría en el Día de Veteranos. El desfile que tenía previsto realizar la ciudad de Dallas, en el que participarían bandas y unidades de JROTC de Dallas ISD, tuvo que ser cancelado debido al mal tiempo.


Cuerpo de Cadetes de Liderazgo de Marsh Prep recibe a invitado especial para el Día de Veteranos

El jueves, 8 de noviembre, el Cuerpo de Cadetes de Liderazgo (LCC) de Thomas C. Marsh Preparatory Academy participó en un evento especial en conmemoración del Día de Veteranos como parte de la noche informativa donde se destacaron los programas que se ofrecen en la escuela.

El LCC Military Museum estuvo abierto para que la comunidad pudiera recorrerlo y en el salón del LCC se realizó una recepción para homenajear a los veteranos. El sargento mayor Robert B. Breck del Comando Médico 807, con base en Fort Douglas, Utah, fue el invitado especial. Durante el día, conversó con los estudiantes de las clases de LCC, así como en la recepción por la noche, donde su hija Jamee Jones, maestra en Marsh, tuvo el honor de presentarlo.

El sargento Breck compartió sus experiencias y les recordó a los estudiantes lo importante que es ser humildes, amables y respetuosos.

El Día de Veteranos se celebra oficialmente el 11 de noviembre, pero este año se conmemorará el lunes, 12 de noviembre.


Dallas ISD commemorates Veterans Day

In recognition of Veterans Day, schools across Dallas ISD on Monday honored veterans of U.S. military service.

Meanwhile, district administrators thanked the hundreds of district employees who are veterans and bring the same devotion of sense and duty they gave to the country.

Military veteran finds calling as a teacher at McShan Elementary (video)

Skyline High School started the day by saluting and raising the flags of the United States and State of Texas, and the JROTC paid its respects to veterans while standing outside in the chilly rain.

Skyline High School ROTC members commemorate Veterans Day.

The Thomas C. Marsh Preparatory Academy’s Leadership Cadet Corps on Thursday participated in a special Veterans Day event as part of the school’s Preview Night. The LCC Military Museum has been open for tours and a reception for family honoring veterans.

Thomas C. Marsh Preparatory’ Academy’s Leadership Cadet Corps (LCC) participated in a special Veterans Day event.

At Dallas City Hall, the Dallas ISD student winners of the Veterans Day Art Contest were recognized for their artwork commemorating the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I – Armistice Day – which later became Veterans Day. The City of Dallas Veterans Day Parade, which was going to feature Dallas ISD marching bands and JROTC units, was cancelled due to weather.

Stephanie Cardona of O.W. Holmes Middle School took first place in the three-dimensional art category with her sculpture of the sinking of the RMS Lusitania in May 1915.

 


Marsh Prep’s LCC hosts special guest, tours in honor of Veterans Day




Thomas C. Marsh Preparatory’ Academy’s Leadership Cadet Corps (LCC) participated in a special Veterans Day event as part of the school’s Preview Night on Thursday, Nov. 8, to showcase the programs available at the school.

The LCC Military Museum was open for tours and a reception for families honoring veterans was conducted in the LCC classroom. Special guest Command Sergeant Major Robert B. Breck of the 807th Medical Command based in Fort Douglas, Utah, spoke in LCC classes during the day and also spoke during the evening reception, where he was introduced by his daughter Jamee Jones, a teacher at Marsh.

CSM Breck shared his experiences and also reminded students to be humble, kind and respectful. 

Veterans Day is Sunday, Nov. 11, but will be observed on Monday, Nov. 12. A parade Monday through downtown Dallas will feature Dallas ISD students in JROTC, marching band and other groups to honor veterans.


Ceremony celebrates Sudie Williams’ transformation into a TAG Academy



















It was a busy week for Dallas ISD’s Sudie L. Williams Talented & Gifted Academy.

After having an open house to showcase the school’s programs to prospective families on Wednesday, Nov. 7, the campus hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony to officially dedicate the school’s new direction on Friday, Nov. 9. That evening, the school had its Fall Carnival – complete with a haunted house. But that level of activity appears to be par for the course at a place where there’s always much to do, see and learn.

Opened in 1952, Sudie Williams was a traditional elementary school and became a TAG academy this year, at first accommodating grades 4-6, and adding a grade each school year up to 8th grade starting in 2020. Students must apply to attend, and there is an academic requirement to be considered.

Principal Michael Jackson welcomed guests and thanked them for their support of the school’s new direction. He shared a quote with a message that underpins the school’s new focus.

“Coming together is the beginning, keeping together is progress, and working together is success,” Jackson said. “Together we hope we will have an amazing, amazing first chapter of Sudie TAG, and a great day to start.”

Student leaders led the Pledge of Allegiance, Texas Pledge and the school’s Lion’s Creed, as well has introduced guest speakers, talked about the school’s vision from their perspective and about the life of Sudie L. Williams (1870-1940) – a Dallas music educator who notably fought to save the Dallas Symphony. Students in orchestra and modern band played musical pieces, and the school’s cheer team also performed.

High expectations

“It’s a great day for a celebration of a new school offering fresh learning opportunities for gifted students,” said District 2 Trustee Dustin Marshall, adding that the school’s goal is to produce the next generation of leaders. “You can see from the students who’ve already been up here that we’re off to a great start.”

Marshall congratulated Jackson and his staff for their hard work in launching the school. “You’ve already begun making a difference in the lives of these students and their parents,” he said.

For students, he said parents and teachers believe in them 100 percent. Now it’s up to them to meet those high expectations. “You need to work hard, learn all you can, read and study, help each other, and most of all, believe in yourselves,” he said. “It’s up to you to apply your talents and skills in a way that will make all of us proud of you.”

Angie Gaylord, Deputy Chief of Transformation and Innovation, thanked parents for partnering with the district in educating their children. The school provides high academic expectations, many extracurricular opportunities and will help students become future leaders.

“It’s a super day at Sudie Williams, can you tell?” Gaylor asked. “It’s so nice to walk in this building, you all feel it. There’s an energy in this school. Parents, it starts with you. Teachers, it starts with you. Students, all of you are gifted students with high academic expectations.”

A leap of faith

Parent Stephanie Rosuck serves on the school’s site-based decision-making committee and has a daughter in the fifth grade at Sudie Williams.

She said she was blown away by the students and especially the musical performances.

“This is an incredible example of what happens when you get talented and gifted kids together in an environment where they are nurtured, and learning together, and are incentivized by their teachers to grow,” Rosuck said. “That’s 57 days (of school so far), is that how many days? What? I’m floored by that.”

She thanked Gaylord, Marshall and trustees for seeing the need for a TAG academy at Sudie Williams.

“There were parents like my family that were going into private schools because our gifted and talented kids weren’t getting the kind of education they needed in the public school,” she said, adding that it takes a special program with special teachers to be successful. She pointed to Jackson and what she called his extraordinary ideas as the driving forces for the school.

When she attended the school’s first open house, before the school year began, no teachers had been hired and Jackson was not officially the principal.

“It was truly a leap of faith,” Rosuck said. “But after having met him, and after seeing the vision he had for this school, there was no doubt in my mind that this school was going to truly be exceptional. And I had no hesitation about sending my daughter here.”

She said her daughter used to come home frustrated after school, but while attending Sudie Williams she comes home excited, and is excited the next morning to return. She asked students to raise their hands if they love going to school there – and all their arms shot up in the air.

“I am really so excited about this school and so excited about where it’s going,” Rosuck said. “It takes a truly exceptional educator to meet children where they are, even when there’s a wide range of abilities.” She said she expects that more neighborhood families will be drawn to the school and stay in Dallas ISD because of the quality of the education there.

Applications are being accepted to attend Dallas ISD specialty schools for the 2019-2020 school year now until Jan. 31, 2019. Learn more at www.dallasisd.org/yourchoices.


Picture Perfect: Student photographers shine at art opening

Dozens of people showed up Thursday night for the opening of a special student-led photography exhibit featuring amazing shots of Dallas.

The reception at Polk-Wisdom Library honored the fifth-grade students from T.L. Marsalis Elementary School who took part “Our Community” project. Students were responsible for capturing an aspect of their community in a photo, and art teacher Jihan Mitchell had the photos professionally developed for the students at no cost. The best photos were selected for the exhibit.

“By photographing their community, the students get to see the beauty that is around them every day that they might otherwise not notice,” Mitchell said. “Then, this reception gives us the chance to honor these students and give them, their families and greater school community a way to celebrate their artwork and accomplishments.”

The photos will be on display at the Polk-Wisdom Library for the remainder of the school year.


Fundación Jiv Daya entrega tabletas Kindle a 38 escuelas de Dallas ISD 




Los estudiantes de tercer grado en Martin Weiss Elementary School entraron al gimnasio sin saber que estarían “atrapados” en un juego de escape hasta que terminaran varias tareas académicas.

Los grupos pequeños tuvieron que superar desafíos de lectura, ciencias, matemáticas y arte para descifrar un mensaje que les dijo que todos los estudiantes recibirían una tableta Kindle Fire de Amazon para usar con sus tareas. Se les repartirá a cada estudiante y permanecerán en la escuela. Los maestros también recibirán una tableta y serán capacitados sobre cómo aprovecharlas al máximo.

Esta revelación creativa fue uno de los diferentes métodos que emplearon las escuelas de Dallas ISD para sorprender a los estudiantes que recibirían las tabletas, y para incluir algo de diversión y aprendizaje.

Desde 2011, la fundación Jiv Daya ha donado tabletas Amazon Kindle a 80 escuelas de Dallas ISD. Este año, 38 escuelas recibieron tabletas para sus estudiantes de 3º a 5º grado para que las usen en el salón de clases. Las donaciones de 2018 se harán a escuelas en las zonas de asistencia de Adamson, Carter, Jefferson, Molina, Sunset, Seagoville y Wilmer-Hutchins.

La fundación Jiv Daya proporciona subsidios en busca de mejorar la calidad de la atención médica y de la educación en todo el mundo. La fundación opera principalmente en la India y en Dallas con el fin de cumplir su misión.


Dallas ISD progresa: La colaboración y la enseñanza integral mejoran el aprovechamiento académico en George W. Truett Elementary School



George W. Truett Elementary School es una de las 13 escuelas que lograron salir de la lista de escuelas con necesidad de mejorar, lista basada en calificaciones otorgadas por el estado. Existen muchas razones por las que en Truett pasan grandes cosas.

Una de ellas es que se ha logrado retener a muchos miembros de la administración y el personal los últimos años, lo que les ha permitido enfocarse en desarrollar sistemas sustentables para ayudar a garantizar el aprovechamiento estudiantil.

“Nuestro personal está comprometido a formar una comunidad colaborativa que se enfoca en estrategias basadas en la investigación para garantizar el éxito de todos los estudiantes”, dijo la directora Terre Evans. “Mediante esta colaboración, nuestra escuela ha podido enfocarse en el análisis de datos y estrategias educativas para mejorar el aprovechamiento estudiantil en general”.

Pero el éxito no se debe únicamente a la investigación y datos. La implementación de estrategias de aprendizaje socioemocional permite al personal conectar y fomentar relaciones con los estudiantes y sus familias. El resultado de esta colaboración ha sido una comunidad escolar sólida.


Oficina de Equidad Racial lanza iniciativa con el objetivo de reconocer experiencias de todos los estudiantes

La Oficina de Equidad Racial de Dallas ISD dio a conocer la Iniciativa de Lectura Multicultural (ALAANA, por sus siglas en inglés). ALAANA, acrónimo que significa africano, latino, asiático, árabe y nativo americano, tiene el objetivo de reflejar las voces que a veces no se muestran en los libros de historia y la literatura popular.

Una de las metas de la Oficina de Equidad Racial es asegurar que la voz de todos los estudiantes sea escuchada a través de varios medios. Se cree que es fundamental valorar las experiencias de los estudiantes y reconocer la importancia de que se puedan expresar por medio del arte, la literatura y el cine.

El primer evento que se llevará a cabo será una colaboración entre el Departamento STEM de Dallas ISD y el Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales. Los estudiantes que participen en esta excursión al centro recibirán libros de no ficción y ficción relevantes desde el punto de vista cultural.

La ALAANA tendrá varios compromisos con la esperanza de inspirar a los estudiantes, padres, maestros y al personal.


Estudiantes de Winnetka Elementary School disfrutan proyectos de ciencias gracias a colaboración con el Perot Museum








El jueves, 1 de noviembre, se llevó a cabo el evento “Learning is a Walk in the Park” en Winnetka Elementary School, donde los estudiantes y sus familias pudieron disfrutar de robots, lanzamientos de cohetes, garabatos de tres dimensiones, proyectos científicos y mucho más.

El Perot Museum llevó un par de sus camionetas TECH (Tinker, Engineer, Create, Hack, en inglés) y varios otros proyectos y dispositivos. Los estudiantes pudieron aprender sobre los conceptos de STEAM (Ciencias, Tecnología, Ingeniería, Arte y Matemáticas) por medio de su participación.


Brashear Elementary School recibe donativo de $1,300 de Spring Creek Barbecue



El 19 de septiembre se llevó a cabo “Spirit Night” en el restaurante Spring Creek Barbecue ubicado en el 2827 W. Wheatland Road. El 20 por ciento de las ganancias netas que se recaudaron entre las 5 y 9 p.m. fueron donadas a Jimmie Tyler Brashear Elementary School. Al final del evento se logró reunir $1,300. Para recibir el donativo, se debe contar con la participación de por lo menos el 12 por ciento de los estudiantes, y esa noche, hubo 116 alumnos listos para ayudar y disfrutar la comida.

Spring Creek Barbecue colabora con escuelas primarias (prekínder a 6o grado) que se encuentren a cinco millas de una de sus sucursales. Para más información, visite www.springcreekbarbecue.com/community.


Votantes aprueban Elección de Ratificación de Impuestos de Dallas ISD

El martes, los electores del condado de Dallas aprobaron una estrategia que se implementará a largo plazo que tiene como objetivo que el Dallas ISD sea fiscalmente sosteniblemente, mientras también apoyaron iniciativas que han demostrado pueden mejorar el aprovechamiento académico de los estudiantes.

Los funcionarios del distrito indicaron que la aprobación de la Elección de Ratificación de Impuestos (TRE) que aumentará la tasa de impuestos 13 centavos posiciona al distrito para el éxito a largo plazo. Los resultados extraoficiales muestran que cerca del 60 por ciento de los votantes respaldó la TRE, con lo que se busca:

  • Atraer y retener a maestros y personal altamente cualificados;
  • Ofrecer apoyo continuo para establecer una base sólida de aprendizaje a temprana edad;
  • Ampliar el número de escuelas de opción para los estudiantes y sus familias;
  • Asegurar la equidad racial en todo el distrito;
  • Ser fiscalmente responsable en el desarrollo del fondo de reserva del distrito.

La TRE aumentará la tasa de impuestos a $1.17 por cada $100 sobre el valor de una propiedad. Eso significa que, por ejemplo, el propietario de una casa con un valor de $184,574, verá un incremento de $20 mensuales en sus impuestos.

Por otra parte, los votantes también aprobaron las proposiciones de Dallas ISD para apoyar $75 millones en bonos para la compra de autobuses nuevos e instalaciones, $75 millones en bonos para reembolsar las notas de impuestos de mantenimiento pendiente, y la compra de créditos por asistencia.


2018 Fall Conference aims to equip teachers to support diverse learners

An annual Fall Conference for K-12 Reading Language Arts, Social Studies and World Languages teachers is set for 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at W.H. Adamson High School.

The theme of the Language, Literacy and Social Studies Conference is “Supporting Diverse Learners.” About 40 teachers will be presenting in the sessions.

Hundreds of teachers have already registered to attend, so spots are limited. Register today via this link.


Brashear’s Spring Creek Barbecue Spirit Night nets $1,300 for the school



Dallas ISD’s Jimmie Tyler Brashear Elementary School yielded a $1,300 bounty from a barbecue-filled Spirit Night this fall.

The Spring Creek Barbecue restaurant at 2827 W. Wheatland Road played host to the Sept. 19 Spirit Night, with 20 percent of the net proceeds collected between 5 and 9 p.m. that night donated to the school. At least 12 percent of the students have to attend the Spirit Night to qualify for the donation, and with Brashear there were 116 ready to help out (and eat).

Spring Creek Barbecue partners with elementary schools (serving grades pre-K to sixth grade) within five miles of one of its locations. Visit www.springcreekbarbecue.com/community to learn more.


Voters approve Dallas ISD Tax Ratification Election

Dallas County voters Tuesday night approved a long-term strategy to make Dallas ISD fiscally sustainable while supporting initiatives proven to boost student achievement.

District officials said the approval of the 13-cent Tax Ratification Election (TRE) positions Dallas ISD for long-term success. Unofficial results show that nearly 60 percent of voters approved the TRE, which will support:

  • Attracting and retaining high-quality teachers and staff;
  • Ongoing support for building a strong early learning foundation for students;
  • Expanding parent and student’s opportunity of public school choice;
  • Ensuring racial equity throughout the district;
  • Being fiscally prudent in building the district’s assigned fund balance.

The TRE will bring the tax rate to $1.17 per $100 of property value. This, for example, will translate to about a $20 monthly increase for the owner of a home valued at $184,574.

Meanwhile, Dallas voters also approved Dallas ISD propositions to support a $75 million bond for new buses and a bus barn, a $75 million bond to refund outstanding maintenance tax notes, and the purchase of attendance credits.


District’s only standalone pre-K center is officially dedicated









Dallas ISD’s Arlington Park Early Childhood Center may be the district’s smallest campus, but that’s OK because its students are also among the smallest.

The school is the only one in the district to serve pre-kindergarten students exclusively. It opened in August and currently accommodates 103 pint-sized 3-year-old students in its all-day program.

On Tuesday, Nov. 6, staff, students, parents and community members officially dedicated the new facility.

Principal Enrique Escobedo, who also leads nearby Obadiah Knight Elementary School, said it takes a special kind of teacher to spend the day with 3-year-olds: someone who is patient, humane and loving.

The diversity of the school – the students speak at least 10 different languages – is seen as an asset. “All children can get along regardless of where they came from, regardless of the language they speak,” he said.

He introduced Assistant Principal Maryann Rodriguez, who oversees the day-to-day operation of the school, who called the work she’s able to do at Arlington Park a blessing.

Executive Director Clarita Rivera said students who enroll in pre-kindergarten begin a path to not only being college-ready, but being college-strong. She thanked school staff for their hard work and the parents for their trust.

“Continue to engage with us,” Rivera told parents. “Continue to be part of our community of learners.”

A rich history

District 8 Trustee Miguel Solis also thanked staff and also Assistant Superintendent of Early Learning Derek Little for being a champion of the concept at the administrative level.

“I get to cut a lot of ribbons. I’ve probably done more in the past two weeks than in my entire tenure as a trustee,” Solis said. “This is without a doubt, hands-down, the most special ribbon-cutting for me.”

As a former teacher and district employee, he decided to seek a seat on the school board in 2012 to represent District 8, which is physically, ethnically and socioeconomically diverse. As he was knocking on a lot of doors to meet residents in the district, he discovered Arlington Park for the first time and learned a few things about the community.

It has a proud and rich history, developed by African American veterans who served in World War II. Just down the street is the former home of Sam Tasby, a parent whose lawsuit was the impetus for desegregation in the district.

He also found residents who were upset that their longtime neighborhood school had closed. “They wanted something to happen at this very location for kids,” he said.

Various forces aligned, including strong support from a community with high expectations and funding provided by the Bridge Plan, a program that made money available between the 2008 and 2015 bonds for priority construction.

“The vision for Arlington Park Early Childhood Center emerged, and here we are today,” Solis said. “This is what early learning and pre-K will look like in the future of Dallas ISD.”

Altha Ingram, an Arlington Park resident and volunteer at the new school, has a grandson who attends. She volunteers during lunchtime a few times a week, she said, because it is the responsibility of parents and grandparents to be involved.

“We have to make sure the little people grow up to be responsible, respectable adults,” she said. “We are all part of their village. We all have to work together.”

The future of pre-K

Early in the process, Little recalls Trustee Solis asking him how enrollment was going at Arlington Park. “We had two on that particular day,” he said, noting that with 103 students, the school is now at capacity for 3-year-olds.

He said about a third of the students live in Arlington Park, while the rest come from across Dallas ISD. There has also been interest from families outside the district. Some of the children have parents who work at one of the nearby hospitals.

Three students led the Pledge of Allegiance and Texas Pledge at the beginning of the ceremony. “They don’t develop into that without the work of their teachers and the folks who are in their classrooms every day,” Little said. “Our commitment to you is that this continues to be the best place for pre-K in Dallas ISD. This is a promise for decades to come.”

Amber Scanlan from business partner PNC Financial Services said her company has an early learning initiative to support children ages 0-5 called “Grow Up Great.” Citing scientific studies, she said the early years are important because research suggests that 90 percent of brain development happens by the age of 5.

“In the first five years of life, it is the most important time to set them on a path to success,” Scanlan said. “This school is one of the most innovative investments in education,” she said. “We’re so proud of all your work.”

So far, PNC has participated in Principal for a Day, among other things. She said the company is now working to provide a financial gift to allow teachers to fulfill some of the new school’s needs.

“Thank you for letting us be here, and we’ll be here a lot,” she said.

Getting a head start

Tim Strucely, executive director of Dallas ISD Construction Services, said the new school cost $4.5 million. “It is a small amount of money to build such a high-impact facility,” he said, also thanking the community for their patience during the construction. He also noted that the dedication plaque from the original Arlington Park Learning Center was preserved and installed in the new building, and the “Arlington Park” letters on the front are from that first building.

What happens inside the building is seen as the most important component of all.

Escobedo said that while pre-kindergarten for 4-year-olds has been proven to help ensure future academic success, pre-K for 3-year-olds makes even a stronger case for giving students a head start.

“They are going to be the most advanced students in the classroom,” he said, adding that students who get a jump on their education are likely to stay ahead of peers.


Dallas ISD’s STEM Health and Physical Education Department is one of a kind

Under the leadership of Director Barbara Johnson, the STEM Health and Physical Education Department is likely the only one of its kind in the country.

Johnson said it makes sense to combine STEM, which stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, and Health and Physical Education since both are key components in growing students into strategic and creative problem solvers.

Formerly known as the Urban School Wellness Department, the STEM Health and Physical Education Department is coordinating in-school initiatives such as kinesthetic classrooms, the digital media fair, Fitness Stars—which teaches STEM through hockey—and Read and Ride, which places stationary bike desk is in campus media centers/libraries.

“Our primary goal for the 2018-2019 school year is to support the schools in Dallas ISD by encouraging campus administration to utilize their health and physical education teachers to lead the charge in establishing a campus culture of real world problem-solving, communicating, collaborating, and creating,” Johnson said. “Working together, we can prepare all students to be future leaders and healthy, successful lifelong learners.”


Explore las escuelas de Dallas ISD durante las noches informativas

Las noches informativas de Dallas ISD comenzaron el 1 de noviembre y las familias tienen la oportunidad de aprender sobre las excelentes opciones académicas que se ofrecen en las escuelas del distrito.

Invitamos a las familias para que se informen sobre las escuelas en los vecindarios, los programas de STEM/STEAM, artes escénicas, Montessori y magnet, el programa de lenguaje dual bilateral, las escuelas exclusivamente para niños o niñas y las academias universitarias.

Las noches informativas se realizarán del 1 de noviembre al 19 de diciembre.

Para ver el horario completo de las noches informativas haga clic aquí.


La Oficina de Equidad Racial ayuda a desarrollar el liderazgo en los jóvenes

La Oficina de Equidad Racial de Dallas ISD está colaborando con el programa Project MALE para ofrecer a los jóvenes de Wilmer-Hutchins Elementary School, Mark Twain Elementary School y South Oak Cliff High School la oportunidad de desarrollar su carácter y liderazgo.

Los líderes de Project MALE diseñaron sesiones mensuales de 2 a 3 horas para enseñar los objetivos del programa por medio de las cinco áreas de contenido: educación, socialización, historia y cultura, autocontrol y vidas saludables. Los estudiantes también participarán en excursiones y exposición a diferentes profesiones, además visitarán una universidad.

También tomarán parte en actividades de aprendizaje financiero y en al menos un proyecto de servicio comunitario. En 2018 y 2019, las sesiones mensuales se realizarán cada segundo sábado en la Universidad del Norte de Texas en Dallas.

Los padres también pueden participar en el programa. Project MALE tendrá sesiones para los padres con un enfoque en proveer información útil sobre cómo relacionarse con sus hijos, cómo financiar su educación superior y cómo mantener vidas y dietas saludables.

Project MALE busca alcanzar las siguientes metas:

— Responsabilidad personal: donde explorarán la capacidad de vincular las opciones, acciones y consecuencias con la práctica de tomar decisiones éticas.

— Responsabilidad social: que incluye el conocimiento de otras culturas, la responsabilidad cívica y el beneficio de tomar parte en comunidades regionales, nacionales y globales.

​– Pensamiento crítico: Cómo leer y revisar información para determinar un problema y resolverlo.

Los integrantes de la Oficina de Equidad Racial están entusiasmados de trabajar con los socios de la comunidad comprometidos a ofrecer programas integrales a los estudiantes para mejorar sus experiencias en Dallas ISD y apoyar su desarrollo como líderes.

“¡La primera sesión de Project MALE fue estupenda! Me alegro de guiar a nuestros jóvenes en su camino a ser hombres al lado de líderes determinados”, expresó Joseph Thomas, líder de mentores en South Oak Cliff High School. “Es el momento justo para preparar a nuestros jóvenes a ser líderes”.


Miles asisten a evento Descubre Dallas ISD

Más de 1,300 familias—aproximadamente 4,000 personas en total—dieron un paso adelante en la búsqueda de la mejor escuela para su hijo durante el evento Descubre Dallas ISD que se realizó el 3 de noviembre en el centro de Dallas.

En el evento se contó con la presencia de representantes de 60 escuelas especializadas del distrito que ofrecen programas magnet, Montessori, o planteles exclusivamente para niños o niñas, y academias universitarias.

“Agradezco que todas las escuelas y sus excelentes programas estén en un solo lugar en un evento como este”, dijo Rachel Castillo, madre de un pequeño que asistirá al 1er grado el próximo año. “Esta es una manera provechosa de pasar un sábado por la mañana”.

Por primera vez, los padres tuvieron la oportunidad de completar una solicitud en el evento y las escuelas recibieron más de 700 solicitudes.

Descubre Dallas ISD dio comienzo oficialmente al periodo de solicitud para las escuelas de opción. Los padres de familia tienen hasta el 31 de enero para presentar una solicitud para una escuela especializada de Dallas ISD.


Evento destaca la importancia de los programas extracurriculares

Aproximadamente 80,000 niños de 5 a 14 años de edad en el condado de Dallas, pasan cerca de tres horas solos cada noche después de clases y hasta que llegan sus padres a casa después del trabajo. Se busca llenar este tiempo con programas extracurriculares en un ambiente de aprendizaje seguro para los alumnos.

Dicha estadística proviene de Christina Hanger de la organización Dallas Afterschool (https://dallasafterschool.org/), cuyo propósito es incrementar el número de programas extracurriculares y de verano, y mejorar su calidad en comunidades de bajos recursos.

La celebración Lights On Afterschool, evento nacional que se celebrá desde octubre de 2000, destaca la importancia de los programas extracurriculares.

El 25 de octubre, 80 estudiantes de las primarias John Quincy Adams, Martin Weiss y Ascher Silberstein participaron en actividades de ciencias, tecnología, ingeniería y matemáticas (STEM) con la ayuda de mentores adultos y policías de Dallas.

Thomas Taylor, jefe de personal para Renée Hall, jefa del Departamento de Policía de Dallas, dijo que muchos de sus sábados los pasa en eventos con jóvenes, lo cual les ofrece un lugar positivo para interactuar con la policía.

“Nos da la oportunidad de compartir con los jóvenes para que entiendan que apoyamos su desarrollo”, dijo Taylor.

Matt Smith, de la iniciativa Food for Good de PepsiCo, dijo que el programa surgió después de que los funcionarios de CitySquare explicaran que los estudiantes que dependen de los programas de desayuno y almuerzo en la escuela para su alimentación diaria a menudo no tienen acceso a este servicio durante el verano.

Smith comentó que, en 2016, se sirvieron casi 4 millones de comidas después de clases en el condado de Dallas.

“Si todos los niños que pueden recibir una comida después del día escolar lo recibieran, tendríamos que servir más de 50 millones”, expresó Smith. “Todavía falta mucho por hacer para lograrlo; debemos tratar de encontrar medidas que se ajusten a la necesidad y a soluciones al problema”.

Smith dijo que tener más programas extracurriculares de alta calidad donde participan niños da a PepsiCo más oportunidades de ofrecer alimentos.

Sherry West Christian, superintendente adjunta de servicios estudiantiles de Dallas ISD, dijo que hay muchos beneficios más allá del ambiente seguro que ofrecen los programas extracurriculares, como mejoras en el aprovechamiento académico.

“En su mayor parte, son programas divertidos e interactivos, y los estudiantes no se dan cuenta que están aprendiendo”, afirmó Christian.

También, hay oportunidades para que los estudiantes mejoren sus habilidades de comunicación y liderazgo, trabajo en equipo y comportamiento. Christian dijo que muchos participantes se comportan de manera excepcional durante el día escolar para poder seguir asistiendo a los programas extracurriculares que tanto les gustan.

“En el distrito, nos esforzamos al máximo para ofrecer acceso a programas equitativos de alta calidad a los estudiantes para garantizar que tengan todo lo necesario, asegurándonos así de que estamos trabajando en el desarrollo integral de cada estudiante”.

En el Dallas ISD ofrecemos más de 100 programas extracurriculares, algunos dirigidos por el personal escolar, y otros coordinados por increíbles organizaciones. El distrito está trabajando para establecer programas adicionales donde se necesitan, aseguró Christian.


Dual-language TAG school celebrates its grand opening in Pleasant Grove











The School for the Talented and Gifted in Pleasant Grove breaks new ground in many ways, the most prominent that it’s the first such school in Pleasant Grove and the district’s first Dual-Language TAG campus.

On Nov. 2, the new school celebrated its official dedication. Just like the school’s curriculum, speakers gave remarks in both English and Spanish.

Principal Ruby Ramirez said the school develops a strong pride for bilingual education that goes further than programs in traditional school settings.

“The energy behind our program is what pushes us to not only challenge the status quo, but create buy-in from all of our leaders, many of whom are present this morning, that would otherwise not exist,” Ramirez said.

District 4 Trustee Jaime Resendez praised the school for offering a high-quality school choice in Pleasant Grove.

“We know that we have talented students all over this district,” Resendez said. “We know we have very, very intelligent students in this community.”

He thanked Ramirez and her staff for developing the school and creating a welcoming environment, and thanked parents for their support of the new school.

“Focus on your studies,” he told students. “Read every single day. Our city needs you, our world needs you, our state needs you. You will always represent Pleasant Grove in a very positive manner.”

Chief Academic Officer Ivonne Durant said Dallas boasts extremely talented children, and there is a core of that talent in Pleasant Grove.

She acknowledged parents for putting their trust in the district, the new school and its teachers. She also noted the work it takes to launch a new school.

“Opening a new school is not easy,” Durant said. “You wonder, ‘What did I get myself into?’ And then you see the children come in, and you say, ‘This is why I did it. I believe in my children. This is pioneer work that is not being done in many places.’ ”

Parent Victor Aguilera said the school represents a new direction for the community.

“As Hispanics, we are a proud people,” Aguilera said. “We push our kids to do better, but not really guiding them to where we want them to be. The school shows a commitment from Dallas ISD, shows that our kids have a different opportunity, a different choice to move forward.”

Juan Bustamante, a fifth-grade science and social studies teacher at the school, was recently selected as its campus Teacher of the Year. He said he was born, raised, attended Dallas ISD schools and still lives in the community he grew up in.

He told students that their leadership will be important, because Latinos and African Americans are predicted to represent the majority of Americans for the first time by the year 2040.

“You are going to be between 28 and 31 years old,” Bustamante said. “You guys will be the first generation of students who will need to take on the responsibility of being the new leaders in science, technology, education, business, military, politics, math and any other careers you decide to pursue.”

He told students they should never give up, always try their best, not make excuses and always give 100 percent effort.

Ramirez echoed those sentiments before the ribbon was cut. “It’s up to you to continue with your education,” she said. “Because that diploma is something no one can ever take away from you.”

A welcome was delivered by student Brisia Alderete. Fifth-graders performed a song, “Wade in the Water,” under the direction of music teacher Michael McFatter. The student broadcast team also streamed the dedication ceremony online, with students not inside the auditorium able to watch the event.


Thousands attend Discover Dallas ISD school shopping experience

More than 1,300 families—and about 4,000 total people—took a big step toward finding their dream school at the Discover Dallas ISD school shopping experience held Nov. 3 in Downtown Dallas.

Discover Dallas ISD featured representatives from 60 district schools that offer specialty programs such as magnets, Montessori, single-gender and collegiate academies. The district designed the user-friendly, customer-service rich experience with parents in mind.

Adamson High School Principal Diana Nunez talks with families about the school’s collegiate academy program.

“I appreciate how Discover puts all these different schools with outstanding programs conveniently under one roof,” said Rachel Castillo, a mother of a young child who will attend first-grade next year. “This is a very worthwhile way to spend a Saturday morning.”

Parents apply onsite for a specialty school or program at Discover Dallas ISD.

For the first time, Discover provided an opportunity for parents to complete and submit applications for their child onsite. Parents completed more than 700 applications at the event.

A student shows off his ‘Future Dallas ISD Graduate’ superhero cape at Discover Dallas ISD.

Discover Dallas ISD formally kicked off the Choice School Application window. Parents can go here to apply to a Dallas ISD specialty school through Jan. 31.


Dallas ISD Rising: Proven educator leading Dunbar Learning Center to next level

When Paul L. Dunbar Learning Center Principal Alpher Garrett-Jones started setting up for the school year’s first Parent Teacher Association meeting, she fielded questions on why they should set up so many chairs.

After all, only three people signed in for the PTA meeting the previous school year.

But Garrett-Jones, who previously served as the longtime principal at Charles Rice Elementary School—which many consider one of the best schools in Dallas—made parental involvement a top priority after taking over the campus this year. And by the time the PTA meeting kicked off with giveaways, student performances and a special talk with former Dallas Cowboys player Charles Haley, nearly 170 parents and family members had filled the room.

“You have to get parents involved in their child’s education. I’ve seen firsthand how it makes all the difference in the world,” Garrett-Jones said. “We are building trust among our parents, and they are seeing the changes happening here with their own eyes.”

Garret-Jones took over as principal at Dunbar Learning Center as it became part of the “ACE Leadership” model aimed at boosting student achievement through a strong focus on developing teacher leadership. The program incentivizes top teacher leaders, principals and campus leaders to study leadership, curriculum alignment, data and other best practices. They then apply these practices to improve teaching and learning on their campuses.

District to expand ACE program to boost struggling schools

“Strong leaders and effective teachers are the key to any school success. We are excited that through the ACE program, we can reinvigorate schools such as Dunbar to reach greater success for students with outstanding personnel,” said Jolee Healey, the Dallas ISD assistant superintendent who oversees the ACE program. “Through the ACE leadership model, we are focusing on learning and transformation by building expertise at all levels to ensure success is sustainable.”

While Dunbar Learning Center got off the Improvement Required list this school year, Garrett-Jones is focused on taking the school to the next level. The campus this year started offering extracurricular activities such as choir, dance club and chess club, and is partnering with the Frazier House and Boys and Girls Club to bring in after-school programs to the campus. As part of the ACE Leadership Model, Garrett-Jones was also able to recruit excellent educators and campus leaders.

“It is not a quick or simple process to transform a school, but we are well on our way here at Dunbar Learning Center,” Garrett-Jones said.


Black Panther car rolls into J.N. Ervin as part of ‘career day on wheels’










Students at J.N. Ervin Elementary School got a closeup look at Dallas Police cars, a DART bus and one special vehicle few get to see in person – one of the 10 Lexus LC500 cars used in the movie Black Panther – complete with simulated scratches and bullet holes.

During the “Career Day on Wheels,” students talked to police officers and DART representatives, as well as Toyota employees who, along with the special Lexus coupe, brought a more standard version and a giant Toyota Tundra pickup.

Toyota has a special partnership with Ervin Elementary that includes pairing students with company employees who help them read through TutorMate, an online tutoring program that connects them with virtual readings.


Perot Museum brings fun science projects to Winnetka Elementary








Robots, rocket launches, three-dimensional doodlers and so much more kept students and their families engaged on Thursday, Nov. 1, at Winnetka Elementary School.

The evening, “Learning is a Walk in the Park” – playing off a Jurassic Park theme – featured all kinds of hands-on scientific projects. The Perot Museum took a couple of its TECH trucks (Tinker, Engineer, Create, Hack) and a bunch of other projects and gadgets.

The projects demonstrated concepts of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics).


Racial Equity Office launches initiative to help recognize experiences of all students

The Dallas ISD Racial Equity Office announced the ALAANA Multicultural Reading Initiative. ALAANA is an acronym for African, Latinx, Asian, Arab and Native American, and the initiative’s intent is to capture the voices of humanity that are sometimes silenced in history books and in popular literature.

One of the goals of the Racial Equity Office is to ensure all student voices are heard through a variety of mediums. The office believes it’s imperative to value students’ lived experiences and recognize the importance of their voices being expressed in art, literature and film.

The first engagement of this initiative will be a collaboration with Dallas ISD STEM Department and the Environmental Science Center. All students that participate in a field trip to the center will receive culturally relevant fiction and non-fiction books.

There will be a number of engagements for the ALAANA Multicultural Reading Initiative, with the hopes of inspiring students, parents, faculty and staff.


Trustees briefed on ‘work-in-progress’ plan to address school facility needs

Dallas ISD officials briefed trustees Thursday on a proposal that sets strategic facility goals to modernize facilities and create greater efficiencies. District officials said the proposal is a work in progress and is expected to continue to evolve.

Dallas ISD Deputy Superintendent Scott Layne emphasized that any of the actions proposed in the Strategic Facilities Plan—such as consolidating, closing or building new schools—are just considerations at this point, and each would have to be approved by trustees and incorporate community feedback. Layne said an approved future bond program—the earliest possibility being in 2021—would also be necessary to turn the proposed plan into reality.

The Strategic Facilities Plan Version 1.1 presented to trustees Nov. 1 proposes 17 new replacement campuses, two school closures and two demolitions. The previous Strategic Facilities Plan Version 1.0, which was presented to trustees during a Sept. 22 workshop, proposed 25 new replacement campuses, 22 school closures and 47 demolitions.

The draft Strategic Facilities Plan 1.1 is entirely separate from the Long-Range Master Plan, which simply provides data and information relative to facilities assessments, conditions and capacity/enrollment at every school.

Layne repeated throughout his presentation to trustees that the Strategic Facilities Plan 1.1 is a draft plan and will likely continue to evolve.

“We will continue to listen to and work with our community members and stakeholders as we go forward with identifying how we can make a long-term investment in district schools and a vision for renovated and modern campuses,” Layne said. “Together we can create the next generation of learning environments that set all students up for success.”


Explore Dallas ISD schools at Fall Preview Nights that kick off Nov. 1

The Dallas ISD Fall Preview Nights kick off Nov. 1 and will provide opportunities for families to learn about the exciting learning opportunities offered in district schools.

From neighborhood schools to STEM/STEAM, performing arts, Montessori and magnets, to two-way dual language, single-gender and collegiate academies, families are invited to see what Dallas ISD has to offer.

Campuses will hold the Fall Preview Nights from Nov. 1–Dec. 19.

For a complete list of Fall Preview Nights and dates, go here.


Adamson High School becomes Telemundo newscast set for a day









W. H. Adamson High School was the set for Telemundo 39’s 4, 4:30 and 5 p.m. newscasts on Thursday, Oct. 25, as part of the station’s Contigo Primero en Tu Comunidad (With You in the Community First) campaign. Newscast anchors, led by anchors Nancy Leal and Carlos Zapata, hosted three shows from the school’s auditorium. The hour-and-a-half broadcast featured Adamson’s automobile cluster, the track and basketball teams, the Collegiate Academy, cheerleaders, dancing team, cast members from the Dracula play, recent academic gains and much more.


La Preparatoria Adamson se convierte en set de noticias por un día









La Escuela Preparatoria W. H. Adamson, fue el set para los noticieros de las 4, 4:30, y 5 p.m. de Telemundo 39, el jueves, 25 de octubre, esto como parte de la campaña del canal – Contigo Primero en Tu Comunidad. Los presentadores de noticias, encabezados por Nancy Leal y Carlos Zapata, condujeron los tres noticieros desde el auditorio de la escuela. Durante la trasmisión de hora y media, se destacaron varios programas y áreas de Adamson como el programa de automotriz, los equipos de atletismo y baloncesto, la Academia Universitaria, las porristas, el equipo de baile, el talento estudiantil de la obra de teatro Dracula, recientes logros académicos y mucho más.


$20 la hora: Dallas ISD sube el salario inicial para conductores de autobús con CDL y credenciales necesarias

Dallas ISD subió el salario inicial a $20 a la hora para conductores de autobús con licencia comercial (CDL) vigente y certificaciones (endorsements) de transporte de pasajeros y estudiantes.

Si cuenta con una CDL y está interesado en ser conductor de autobús en Dallas ISD, le invitamos a comunicarse con el Departamento de Transporte al 972-925-3451.

Gloria Maddox-Powell, jefa adjunta de servicios de operación del distrito, dijo que el aumento le permite a Dallas ISD competir de mejor manera con los demás distritos en nuestra área.

“Valoramos a los conductores por el papel fundamental que desempeñan al transportar a los estudiantes de manera segura, antes y después del día escolar”, dijo Maddox-Powell. “Invitamos a todos los que cuenten con las credenciales necesarias a comunicarse con nosotros sobre la oportunidad de ser conductor en el Dallas ISD”.


The Mindful Moment: Mistakes offer opportunities for children to learn

Dallas ISD’s Psychological and Social Services produces a monthly newsletter to share ideas on how to approach aspects of a child’s education. The October 2018 edition makes the case for allowing children to make mistakes, and using mistakes as teaching moments to help them grow.

To receive each month’s “The Mindful Moment” newsletter, email Kiki Yardeni at @ryardeni@dallasisd.org.


Dallas ISD Rising: Teamwork, whole-child approach boost George W. Truett

Dallas ISD’s George W. Truett Elementary is one of 13 campuses to escape the Improvement Required list, which is based on ratings from the state. There are several reasons Truett is a school where great things are happening.

One factor has been retaining much of the administration and staff the past several years, which has allowed them to focus on developing sustainable systems for helping to ensure student achievement.

“Our staff has a commitment to build a collaborative community that focuses on research-based strategies to ensure the success of all students,” said Principal Terre Evans. “Through this collaboration, our school was able to focus on data analysis and instructional strategies to increase our overall student achievement.”

But the success isn’t due solely to research and data, however. Implementing Social Emotional Learning strategies allows staff to connect and build relationships with students and families. As a result, the collaboration has built a stronger school community.

 

Further, there are other ways students fall in love with learning.

“We offer a variety of extracurricular activities that keep all students engaged,” Evans said. “We have after-school clubs such as cheerleading, chess, basketball and soccer teams, debate team, Destination Imagination, Little Kids Rock, art club and many others.”

That approach means the campus can address the whole child’s needs on campus. That includes donated uniforms for students who need them; Brighter Bites, which provides nutrition and education for entire families; fresh fruit and vegetables on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and hot meals provided every day after school before club meetings and tutoring.

“Our teachers and staff are a cohesive group that collaborate to promote and support students’ academics, language and engagement,” Evans said. “The school has dedicated professionals who have a ‘can do’ and ‘will do’ attitude that will go the extra mile to foster a positive learning environment.”

 

Another factor is brining in parents to be a major part of the process. That includes, but is not limited to, a monthly coffee/breakfast with Evans to listen to the concerns of parents, provide clarification or explain school systems. Parents also visit the school during monthly PTA meetings, which include student performances.


Descubra la mejor escuela para su hijo en Descubre 2018

Cada padre sueña con encontrar la mejor escuela para su hijo, donde se aprovechen los intereses, aspiraciones y estilos de aprendizaje de cada uno de ellos— una tarea que puede resultar estresante.

El 3 de noviembre, el Dallas ISD realizará un evento diseñado para simplificar y agilizar dicho proceso. Descubre Dallas ISD promete ser el evento más importante en la ciudad donde los padres podrán explorar todas las opciones educativas especializadas que ofrece el distrito, desde escuelas STEM/STEAM, programas de artes escénicas, escuelas Montessori y magnet, programas de lenguaje dual bilateral, planteles exclusivos para niños o niñas y academias universitarias. Encontrarán un ambiente amigable pensado en los padres.

El distrito cuenta con múltiples opciones académicas ubicadas por toda la ciudad, por lo que seguro encontrarán una escuela que se adapta a las habilidades e intereses únicos de su hijo.

Habrá representantes de 58 escuelas especializadas de Dallas ISD que les proporcionarán información y contestarán sus preguntas sobre los requisitos de admisión, el proceso de solicitud, los programas académicos, y las actividades después de clases y extracurriculares. Además, este año, los padres podrán completar y presentar las solicitudes en el evento.

Para más información, visite www.dallasisd.org/descubre

¡Anote en su calendario!
Sábado, 3 de noviembre de2018
9 am – 1 pm
The Fashion Industry Gallery (The F.I.G.)
1807 Ross Avenue
Dallas, TX 75201
Entrada gratis
Estacionamiento gratis en el Ross Tower Parking Garage enfrente del F.I.G.


Jiv Daya Foundation donates Kindle tablets to 38 Dallas ISD schools




Third-graders at Martin Weiss Elementary School filed into the gym recently not knowing they would be “trapped” in an escape room until finishing several academic tasks.

In small groups, they would complete reading, science, math and art challenges to decode a message that would tell them that each student would be receiving an Amazon Kindle Fire tablet to use for schoolwork. Teachers also receive Kindles and training on how to maximize their use. The Kindles are issued to each student, and the devices stay at school.

The creative “reveal” was one of several methods that Dallas ISD schools used to tell students about the Kindles and inject some fun and learning into the mix.

Since 2011, the Jiv Daya Foundation has donated Amazon Kindle tablets to a total of 80 Dallas ISD schools. This year, 38 schools received the Kindles for third- through fifth-grade students to use in class. The 2018 donations are going to schools in the Adamson, Carter, Jefferson, Molina, Sunset, Seagoville and Wilmer-Hutchins feeder patterns.

The Jiv Daya Foundation provides targeted grants to improve the quality of healthcare and education around the world. The foundation works primarily in India and Dallas to carry out its mission.


Dade Middle School counselor a finalist for national award

The American School Counselor Association announced that Billy Earl Dade Middle School counselor Nwakaego Edordu Oriji is one of six finalists for the 2019 School Counselor of the Year awards program.

The award honors the school counseling professionals who devote their careers to serving as advocates for students, helping them achieve success in school and life. Edordu Oriji has served as a counselor at Dade Middle School for four years.

“Being named a finalist is a privilege and honor, but the biggest privilege is to help students, help this school, and help this community,” Edordu Oriji said.

Three schools earn statewide counseling award

Nominations for the School Counselor of the Year awards program were submitted by the state school counselor associations. Edordu Oriji and the other five finalists and their principals will travel to Washington, D.C., in late January for special celebratory and educational events. The finalists will be honored in an award ceremony and be formally recognized at a black-tie gala.

“The School Counselor of the Year award is an esteemed recognition for our profession,” said Richard Wong, American School Counselor Association executive director. “School counselors make significant contributions to the overall well‐being of students and their success. Their unique qualifications and training allow them to support students’ academic achievement, career development and social/emotional needs. This award highlights their commitment, dedication and excellence.”


Racial Equity Office partners with program to build leadership skills in young men

The Dallas ISD Racial Equity Office has partnered with the Project MALE Program to provide young men from Wilmer-Hutchins Elementary School, Mark Twain Elementary School and South Oak Cliff High School an opportunity to build character and leadership skills. Project MALE is a year-long program for young men.

​Project MALE leaders have designed 2-3 hour monthly sessions connected to program objectives delivered through five content areas: education, social, history/cultural, self-management, and healthy lifestyles.  Students also engage in field trips, career fairs, and a visit to a college.

Students will also participate in financial literacy activities and at least one community service project. For 2018-2019, monthly sessions are held each second Saturday on the campus of the University of North Texas at Dallas.

This program is also an opportunity to engage parents. Project MALE is holding sessions for parents focused on providing helpful information to parents for relating to their young boys, financing their college education, and maintaining healthy eating and lifestyles.

Project MALE’s goals are:

— Personal Responsibility:  To include the ability to connect choices, actions, and consequences to ethical decision-making.

— Social Responsibility:  To include intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage in regional, national, and global communities.

​– Critical Thinking:  To read and review data to define and solve problems.

The Dallas ISD Racial Equity Office is thrilled to work with community partners that are committed to providing students with well-rounded programming to enhance their experiences in Dallas ISD and support their growth and development as leaders.

“The first session with Project Male was great! I am excited to lead our young men into manhood with bold and courageous leaders,” said Joseph Thomas, South Oak Cliff High School male mentor lead. “It is the right place at the right time to prepare our young men to lead.”


$20 An Hour: Dallas ISD raises starting rate for bus drivers with CDL and appropriate credentials

Dallas ISD has raised the starting pay to $20 an hour for bus drivers with a current commercial driver’s license (CDL) and both the passenger and student endorsements.

Anyone with a CDL who is interested in becoming a Dallas ISD bus driver is encouraged to contact the transportation department at 972-925-3451.

Gloria Maddox-Powell, the district’s deputy chief of operation services, said the increase in starting pay makes Dallas ISD more competitive with the neighboring school districts.

“We value our bus drivers for the crucial role play in getting our students safely to and from school,” Maddox-Powell said. “We strongly encourage anyone with the necessary credentials to contact us about driver opportunities with Dallas ISD.”


Find your child’s dream school at Discover 2018

Every parent dreams of finding a school that taps into their child’s individual interests, learning styles, and aspirations— a task that can prove bewildering.

Dallas ISD’s Nov. 3 Discover event is designed to make the search easier and faster. Discover 2018 promises to be the city’s premier school shopping event where families can browse an array of specialty school options ranging from STEM/STEAM, performing arts, Montessori and magnets, to two-way dual language, single-gender and collegiate academies.

Discover will be a user-friendly, customer-service rich experience designed with parents in mind.  With a choice of dozens of different types of schools located all across the city, parents are certain to find a school tailored to their child’s unique abilities and interests.

Representatives of 58 Dallas ISD specialty schools will be on hand at Discover to provide information and answer questions about admissions requirements, the application process, program offerings, and after-school/extracurricular activities. New this year will be an opportunity for parents to complete and submit applications for their child onsite.

For more information, visit www.dallasisd.org/discover.

Mark your calendar for Discover 2018!
Saturday, November 3, 2018
9 am – 1 pm
The Fashion Industry Gallery (The F.I.G.)
1807 Ross Avenue
Dallas, TX 75201
Free Admission
Free Parking at Ross Tower Parking Garage across from the F.I.G.


Event highlights importance of quality afterschool programs












An estimated 80,000 children ages 5-14 in Dallas County spend about three hours alone each weeknight between school ending and their parents returning home from work. Afterschool programs aim to fill that time with learning in a safe environment.

That statistic came from Christina Hanger of Dallas Afterschool (https://dallasafterschool.org/), a nonprofit organization whose purpose is to increase the number and quality of afterschool and summer programs in low-income communities.

The “Lights On Afterschool” celebration is a nationwide observance of the importance of afterschool programs – highlighted first in October 2000.

The event on Oct. 25 culminated with 80 students from John Quincy Adams, Martin Weiss and Ascher Silberstein elementary schools participated in STEM activities with the help of adult mentors – including Dallas Police officers.

Thomas Taylor, Chief of Staff for Dallas Police Chief Reneé Hall, said many of his Saturdays are spent at youth events, which provides a positive place for children to interact with police.

“It gives us an opportunity to have that first encounter with our youth, for them to understand we support their development,” Taylor said.

Matt Smith of PepsiCo’s Food for Good initiative said the program came about after CitySquare officials explained how students who depend on breakfast and lunch programs in school often don’t have access to food in the summer.

In 2016, he said, there were almost 4 million after-school meals served in Dallas County.

“But if every child got a meal every day a – every eligible child after school – it would be more than 50 million meals,” Smith said. “There’s a lot more work to do, in bridging that gap, trying to scale the solutions to have solutions that match the size of the need and the problem.”

He said more high-quality afterschool programs where children are gathered gives PepsiCo more opportunities to provide food.

Sherry West Christian, Dallas ISD Assistant Superintendent of Student Services, said that there are many benefits beyond the safe and secure environments that afterschool programs provide – particularly academic gains.

“A lot of times, theses are fun and engaging, and they don’t realize that they’re learning, but they actually are learning,” Christian said.

There are also opportunities for students to work on communications and leadership skills, teamwork and behavior issues. She said many afterschool participants are on their best behavior during the school day so that they can continue to attend the afterschool programs they enjoy.

“Within the district, we work really hard to provide equitable programs, access and then high-quality programs to our students to make sure that they are getting the things they need to make sure we are working on the growth of the child from a whole-child perspective,” she said.

There are more than 100 afterschool programs in Dallas ISD, some led by campus staff and others coordinated by a host of incredible partner organizations. The district, she said, is also working to establish programs where they are needed.


Las estudiantes de Young Women’s STEAM Academy investigan la tecnología en Amazon

Las estudiantes de Dallas ISD de Young Women’s STEAM Academy en Balch Springs Middle School recientemente pudieron hacer un recorrido de las instalaciones de un Centro de Cumplimiento de Amazon en Fort Worth.

“Camp Amazon” permitió a las estudiantes ver el edificio, aprender sobre la codificación y como la empresa utiliza robots y otras tecnologías. Las alumnas quedaron impresionadas con la magnitud del edificio y de algunos de los robots a gran escala que se utilizan allí.

“Todas las alumnas aquí tienen un amor por las matemáticas y las ciencias y, cuando nos fijamos en eso, las matemáticas y las ciencias ayudan con la solución de problemas”, dijo Tony Vozzolo, gerente general de las instalaciones. “Aquí en Amazon, en particular en este edificio,– DFW 7 – es lo que hacemos a diario. ¿Cómo resolvemos problemas y cómo mejoramos cada vez más para beneficio de nuestros clientes? Hoy, definitivamente, pudieron ver esto las alumnas y por lo mismo formularon muchas preguntas y aumentaron sus conocimientos, lo cual hizo que esta excursión fuera aún más especial”.

Al final del campamento, la empresa le presentó un cheque de $10,000 a la escuela.


Les espera un futuro prometedor a los estudiantes de la nueva escuela Solar Preparatory for Boys









Los estudiantes, padres de familia, personal escolar y los funcionarios del distrito dedicaron la nueva preparatoria Solar Preparatory for Boys at John F. Kennedy Learning Center el martes, 23 de octubre de 2018.

Este año escolar trae un nuevo programa a la escuela, el cual transforma el plantel escolar de una primaria tradicional mixta a una escuela primaria exclusivamente para varones que integra elementos de capacitación de liderazgo en el plan de estudios. Parecido a su escuela hermana, Solar Preparatory for Girls, que se inauguró en el 2016, la inscripción abierta de la escuela está diseñada cuidadosamente para brindar diversidad étnica y socioeconómica. Al igual que la escuela de niñas, Solar Prep for Boys se ha inaugurado con los grados de pre-K hasta segundo de primaria.

La directora Adriana González agradeció a quienes ayudaron a dar inicio a la escuela, entre estos, la directora de Solar Prep for Girls, Nancy Bernardino, y su personal.

El representante del Distrito 8, Miguel Solís, hizo mención del presidente John F. Kennedy, por el que se nombró originalmente la escuela, para ilustrar uno de los objetivos principales de Solar Prep for Boys.

En un discurso en el 1963 en la Universidad Rice, el presidente Kennedy dijo que era imprescindible que los Estados Unidos enviaran a un hombre a la luna antes del final de esa década.

“El presidente tuvo la visión de pensar de manera audaz”, dijo Solís. “Eso sería peligros o estaría lleno de desafíos, no habían garantías. Sin embargo, pensó que, a través de la innovación, el valor y la determinación, a pesar de los desafíos, fue posible llegar a la luna y hasta llevar a algunos a la luna.”

Asimismo, una escuela como Solar Prep for Boys puede luchar en contra de la segregación, en particular por motivos socioeconómicos y raciales.

“Esta escuela reúne a estudiantes de todos los ámbitos de la vida, en un ambiente acogedor que permite que los estudiantes se vean como son: como niños,” dijo Solís. “Ellos no se fijarán en sus diferencias” y representan un tipo de “lanzamiento a la luna” del distrito.

Los retos serán grandes, dijo el representante, “pero los superaremos y los superaremos juntos. Y nuestros muchachos, los líderes del futuro, serán ejemplos de lo que Dallas puede ser y de lo que debe ser Dallas.

Brian Lusk, Jefe de Iniciativas Estratégicas de Dallas ISD, dijo que la visión comenzó con la Directora González y que desempeñó un excelente trabajo en su escuela anterior, L.K. Hall Elementary School. Dijo que los funcionarios del distrito saben que el modelo de liderazgo de un solo género funciona; en particular, habló sobre su parte en la transición de la escuela Fred F. Florence Middle School a una Academia de Liderazgo Masculino.

El subdirector Derek Thomas habló sobre cómo la escuela proporcionará una base sólida para crear líderes a medida que los estudiantes crecen y continúan aprendiendo.


Maestra de Robert T. Hill Middle School gana premio de NBC5/SMU

Shelly Thibodaux, maestra de Educación Física y entrenadora en Robert T. Hill Middle School, es la ganadora del premio “Excellent Educator” de octubre.

El premio incluye un cheque de $1,000 para la escuela que fue presentado por el presidente de Southern Methodist University (SMU), el Dr. R. Gerald Turner.

La serie “Excellent Educator” es una colaboración entre el canal de televisión NBC 5 y SMU con la que buscan reconocer a educadores en nuestra región que hacen todo lo posible por el éxito de sus estudiantes. Para más información sobre Shelly Thibodaux y su labor en Hill Middle School haga clic aquí.


Maestros de Dallas ISD participarán en evento ‘Touchdown for Teachers’

El sábado, 27 de octubre, están invitados todos los maestros nuevos al evento “Touchdown for Teachers” que se realizará en el campus de Southern Methodist University (SMU) durante el juego de fútbol americano. Los primeros 500 maestros en inscribirse aquí podrán reclamar dos boletos de cortesía para el juego que está programado para comenzar a las 2:30 p.m.

Al mediodía, se organizará una fiesta gratis, tipo “tailgate”, donde habrá comida, bebidas y entretenimiento, así como un mensaje breve de animo de la maestra distinguida de Dallas ISD, Shareefah Mason, que imparte las clases de Gobierno de EE. UU., Gobierno AP y Economía en New Tech High School.

Durante el medio tiempo del juego, se reconocerá a los maestros de Dallas ISD, Matthew Abernathy y Melisa Simon, como “Rising Stars.”

Abernathy es maestro de Álgebra 2 y Precálculo en Justin F. Kimball High School. Simon es maestra de Ciencias de 5º grado en Annie Webb Blanton Elementary School. Recientemente, destacamos a Simon en Nota Escolar, debido a que después de graduarse de W.W. Samuell Early College High School, completó sus estudios universitarios y comenzó su carrera como maestra a la edad de 20 años.

Por último, en el evento también se lanzará oficialmente la coalición Best in Class, un grupo de 50 organizaciones en el área de DFW que están trabajando para asegurar que todos los estudiantes cuenten con excelentes maestros en sus salones de clases.


Alicia Keys y America Ferrera a estudiantes de Skyline: ejerzan su derecho al voto

Afuera del plantel más grande de Dallas ISD se podían escuchar los gritos y cánticos, junto con los tonos melódicos de la sección de percusión de la banda escolar.

El ambiente en la primera escuela magnet en el país era de locura al momento que los estudiantes recibieron una inesperada sorpresa. America Ferrera, mejor conocida por sus papeles protagónicos en el programa de televisión Ugly Betty, y la película The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, apareció junto a dos de sus amigas: la cantante Alicia Keys y Liza Koshy, influencer que ha revolucionado las redes sociales.

La multitud en el auditorio enloqueció. Por un momento, el ruido provocado por los 1,200 estudiantes, maestros, y personal de Skyline High School, así como de los medios de comunicación, enmudecieron el sistema altoparlante.

“Yo soy America Ferrera…”, dijo la actriz y ahora activista, mientras el público se silenciaba. “Pero, así como ustedes, soy estadounidense, y fui una niña de tez morena que creció en este país buscando las mejores oportunidades”.

Las celebridades emprendieron esta iniciativa apartidista como parte de la campaña “Get Out The Vote”, que tiene el objetivo de promover el voto. Durante el 23 de octubre visitaron distintos lugares en nuestra área, incluyendo Skyline High School. Varios estudiantes de último

año, quienes votarán por primera vez en esta elección, sabían de la visita de la actriz, pero se vieron sorprendidos cuando salió acompañada por una las cantantes más famosas del mundo.

“Es un honor para nosotras estar aquí con ustedes. No hay otro lugar en el mundo donde quisiera estar en este momento que Skyline”, dijo Keys. “Esto es Estados Unidos—con toda nuestra diversidad y nuestro propio estilo, y con todos los asuntos que nos preocupan—y tenemos la oportunidad de elegir a quienes nos representan”.

Liza Kosy se hizo eco del mensaje de Ferrera y Keys. Hacia el final del evento, patrocinado en parte por la Student Voter Initiative, un programa apolítico de inscripción de votantes jovenes en el estado, la visita empezaba a generar ruido en las redes sociales.

Quizás, el mejor momento para los estudiantes fue cuando Keys cantó pequeños fragmentos de sus canciones “Girl on Fire” y “No One”.

Keys encabezó su actuación espontánea con una pregunta simple.

“Saben, estaba pensando… si nos tenemos los unos a los otros, podemos lograr cualquier cosa, ¿cierto?”, preguntó Keys. “Así que estaba pensando, y en ese momento comenzó a deleitar al público interpretando una parte de “No One”, ‘You and me together through the days and nights, I don’t worry ’cause, everything’s going to be alright…’”.


Nueve estudiantes de Dallas ISD elegidos para el equipo de baile estatal

La Asociación de Educadores de Baile de Texas (TDEA, en inglés) seleccionó a nueve estudiantes de Dallas ISD, más que en todos los años anteriores, para que participen en el equipo de baile estatal.

El equipo de baile estatal de la TDEA está compuesto de bailarines que representan escuelas de todo el estado. Estos bailarines participarán en una convención que incluirá talleres de baile, capacitación de líderes, clases maestras y la oportunidad de conocer a nuevos colegas. La convención del TDEA se llevará a cabo del 9 al 12 de enero en Houston.

Los nueves bailarines de Dallas ISD que fueron seleccionados son:

• Irma Berlanga, Spruce High School
• Tyianah Duren-Clifton, Molina High School
• Carlos García, Thomas Jefferson High School
• Carolina González, North Dallas High School
• Jacqueline Hernández, Sunset High School
• Alize Rangel, Adamson High School
• Daisy Sosa, Bryan Adams High School
• Kyre Walker, Skyline High School
• Anna Weis, Woodrow Wilson High School

Asimismo, el TDEA dará a cada estudiante $10,000 en becas para sus estudios superiores.


Maestra de educación especial gana premio por sus esfuerzos sobresalientes

Leanne Woods es la segunda maestra galardonada con $250 que entrega Carter Financial Management cada trimestre a maestros de educación especial excepcionales. Los fondos se utilizan para comprar materiales para la clase.

Se invita a los padres, a la comunidad y al personal a que nominen a personas que demuestran las cualidades de un maestro de educación especial distinguido, que establece altas expectativas y esté comprometido a mejorar los resultados de los estudiantes que reciben servicios de educación especial en Dallas ISD.

Woods es maestra de programas especializados en Preston Hollow Elementary School. Fue nominada por un administrador, un padre y un colega. A continuación están algunos comentarios hechos durante su nominación:

• “Es una de las personas que llega primero a la escuela. Siempre está sonriendo y dispuesta a ayudar a toda persona que se lo pida, sin falta”.

• “Apoya la inclusión en toda la escuela y crea oportunidades para que los estudiantes de educación especial interactúen con todos los estudiantes en la escuela. Tienen compañeros de lectura y hasta se escriben cartas con estudiantes de otras clases”.


Hija de Billy Earl Dade inspira a estudiantes en escuela que lleva nombre de su padre

Durante una ceremonia especial en Billy Earl Dade Middle School, la hija del Dr. Dade animó a los estudiantes de la escuela secundaria a trabajar duro para lograr el éxito.

Billie Sanford Dade presidió la ceremonia que se realizó para reconocer a los estudiantes que demuestran excelencia en la escuela. Dade, que viajó desde Atlanta para la ceremonia, comentó que esto es solo el comienzo de una asociación con la escuela para apoyar a los estudiantes.

“Mi padre siempre creyó que toda persona debería recibir una buena educación, sin importar donde viven”, dijo Dade. “Sé que, si el viviera, participaría activamente en esta escuela. Decidí que necesitaba hacer algo por esta escuela para que los estudiantes supiesen que hay mucha gente que los está apoyando para que puedan triunfar”.

Billy Earl Dade fue una figura legendaria en el ramo de la educación que fungió como director en varias escuelas de Dallas ISD como las primarias Frederick Douglass, Paul L. Dunbar y C.F. Carr.

Tom Hayden, del Departamento de Iniciativas Estratégicas y Relaciones Externas de Dallas ISD, agradeció a Dade haber viajado a Dallas para la ceremonia especial.

“Es increíble que el extraordinario legado de estándares educativos continua en la vida de la hija del Dr. Dade”, dijo Hayden.


Young Women’s STEAM Academy students explore tech at Amazon

Students from Dallas ISD’s Young Women’s STEAM Academy at Balch Springs Middle School recently got to tour the inner workings at an Amazon Fulfillment Center in Fort Worth.

“Camp Amazon” allowed students to see the building, learn about coding and how the company uses robots and other technology. Students were amazed at the sheer size of the building, and of some of the large-scale robots in use there.

“All the students in here have a love for math and science, and when we look at that, math and science helps you with problem-solving,” said Tony Vozzolo, general manager of the facility. “Here at Amazon, especially at this building – DFW 7 – that’s what we do every single day. How do we solve problems and how do we get better and better for our customers? The students today definitely saw that, and brought a wealth of questions and knowledge, which made this trip even that much more special.”

At the end of the camp, the company presented a $10,000 check to the school.


Hill Middle teacher is October’s NBC5/SMU Excellent Educator

Shelly Thibodaux, a P.E. teacher and coach at Dallas ISD’s Robert T. Hill Middle School, is October’s “Excellent Educator.”

The award included a $1,000 check for the school, presented by SMU President Dr. R. Gerald Turner.

The Excellent Educator program is coordinated by NBC 5 and SMU to honor educators in the region who go above and beyond. Learn more about how Thibodaux makes a positive difference for students at Hill Middle School here.


Dallas ISD teachers to be part of ‘Touchdown for Teachers’ event

New teachers are invited to Touchdown for Teachers on Saturday, Oct. 27, at the SMU football game. The first 500 teachers to register here can claim two complimentary tickets to the game, which starts at 2:30 p.m.

A free tailgating party begins at noon and will feature food, drinks and entertainment along with a brief message of encouragement from distinguished Dallas ISD teacher Shareefah Mason, who teaches U.S. Government, AP Government and Economics at New Tech High School.

During the halftime program, Dallas ISD teachers Matthew Abernathy and Melisa Simon will be recognized as “Rising Stars.”

Abernathy is an Algebra 2 and Pre-Calculus teacher at Justin F. Kimball High School. Simon is a fifth-grade science teacher at Annie Webb Blanton Elementary School who we featured previously on The Hub because after graduating from W.W. Samuell Early College High School, she was able to complete her bachelor’s degree and begin her teaching career at age 20.

The event also officially launches the Best in Class Coalition, a group of 50 organizations across DFW that are working to ensure all students have access to excellent teachers.


Booker T. Washington HSPVA to get professional-level recording studio

Thanks to a generous fundraising effort and a $766,000 grant, Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts is getting a professional-level recording studio to help students take a major step forward in accomplishing their education and future career goals.

The BTWHSPVA Advisory Board led the fundraising effort to make the recording studio a reality. The project, which also will include the ability to retrofit four classrooms/spaces as satellite recording studios, is scheduled to celebrate its grand opening in Fall 2019.

“The goal for us is to level the playing field and to ensure every student at Booker T. Washington has what they need to reach and achieve their best potential,” said BTWHSPVA Advisory Board Executive Director Lisa Walker.

Walker said when high school seniors apply to college music programs or national competitions, they typically must submit digital recordings of a performance. The BTWHSPVA studio will let students record a high-quality performance, at no cost to them, right on the campus.

“What we’ve found is that many students are not being considered for competitions or acceptance to certain college programs—not because of their ability—but because their recorded materials aren’t of a high enough quality,” BTWHSPVA Principal Dr. Scott Rudes said. “This recording studio will have a huge impact and, like Lisa said, level the playing field.”

Meanwhile, BTWHSPVA will start offering a production track for juniors and seniors to learn how to work behind the boards in the recording studio. Walker and Rudes said the plan is to open the recording studio for all Dallas ISD students who need high-quality recorded materials to submit.

To make the recording studio a reality, the BTWHSPVA Advisory Board committed over $500,000, and two private donors pledged $340,000. To fund the equipment and satellite spaces, the BTWHSPVA Advisory Board applied for and received a $766,000 grant from The Crystal Charity Ball.

“We are extremely thankful to the Booker T. Washington Advisory Board for having the vision to support our kids in this way and for raising the funds to make this possible,” Rudes said.


Preston Hollow special-ed teacher nets prize for going above and beyond

Leanne Woods is the second recipient of a quarterly $250 recognition provided to outstanding special education teachers by Carter Financial Management. Recipients can use the funds to spend on items for their classrooms.

Parents, community and staff are encouraged to identify nominees that demonstrate qualities of a distinguished special education teacher, setting high standards and demonstrating commitment for improving outcomes for students who receive special education services in Dallas ISD.

Woods is a specialized programs teacher at Preston Hollow Elementary.  She was nominated by an administrator, parent and colleague. Below are some of the comments that were made during the nomination.

• “She is one of the first people at school. She is always smiling and open to help every single person who reaches out for her, no matter what.”

• “She encourages inclusion throughout the entire school and creates opportunities for the special education students to interact with all students within the school. They have reading partners with other classes and even pen pals with other classes.”

“Ms. Woods goes above and beyond for the school as a whole. From having her students greet parents and students at carpool in the morning, to chairing the discipline committee and working with the at-risk students, Ms. Woods goes the extra mile every day. When a few struggling students wanted to start a soccer team, she encouraged them and became the team’s general manager. She attended every practice and game (even on rainy, cold Saturdays), and often spends her own time with the students’ families. She has also organized the school’s Talent Show and soccer banquet, which both have a positive affect on the students and our parents.

“She also helped win the healthy choices flash mob contest, awarded by the food services department, and every year organizes the PHE Buddy Walk group to raise awareness for down syndrome. As a result of her community involvement, student centered initiatives, as well as her encouragement of student leadership, our school was recently awarded IB World School status by the International Baccalaureate committee. She has made a huge impact on the student culture of Preston Hollow, and she has a passion for kids unlike any I have ever worked with.”

• “She is exceptional and encourages students to become the best version of themselves they can be. When my son started he couldn’t even write his own name. Now he is reading, doing math and taking spelling test. She genuinely loves these kids and pushes them to their maximum potential.”


Alicia Keys and America Ferrera urge Skyline students to vote

You could hear the loud screams and chants—coupled with the drumline’s melodic lows— from outside of Dallas ISD’s largest campus.

The nation’s first magnet school was pure pandemonium when students received the surprise of a lifetime. Actress America Ferrera, best known for her work in Ugly Betty and The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, appeared from behind a curtain alongside two of her friends: singer Alicia Keys and social media sensation Liza Koshy.

Skyline Principal Janice Lombardi and singer Alicia Keys.

Massive cheers erupted from the crowd of students. For a moment, the excitement from the 1,200 Skyline High School students, teachers, staff and media drowned out the sound system.

“I’m America Ferrera…,” said the actress turned activist, as the crowd came to a silence. “But, just like you, I am a fellow American, and I am a brown kid who grew up in this country looking for the best opportunities.”

The team of celebrities embarked on a non-partisan Get Out The Vote effort that made several stops in DFW on Oct. 23, including Skyline High School. Various seniors, many of whom will be first-time voters this election, knew of Ferrera’s visit, but were taken off guard when she walked out with one of the world’s biggest singers.

“We are so honored to share today with you and there’s no place in the world I’d rather be than Skyline right now,” Keys said. “This is what America looks like—with all of our diversity, all of our flyness, with all the issues that we care about—and we get to choose who represents us.”

Liza Kosy echoed what Ferrera and Keys spoke about. As the half-hour rally came to an end, which was in part sponsored by The Student Voter Initiative, a non-partisan statewide student voter registration program, the visit received plenty of buzz on social media.

But, perhaps the greatest moment for students came when Keys bellowed notes of snippets from her songs “Girl on Fire” and “No One”.

Keys led the impromptu performance with a simple question.

“You know, I was thinking…if we have each other, we can do anything, right?” she asked. “So, I was thinking, ‘You and me together through the days and nights, I don’t worry ’cause, everything’s going to be alright…’”


Nine Dallas ISD students selected for All-State Dance Team

The Texas Dance Educators’ Association (TDEA) selected nine Dallas ISD students to participate in its All-State Dance Team, which is more than any previous year.

The TDEA All-State Dance Team is made up of dancers representing schools from across the state. All-State dancers participate in a convention that includes dance workshops, leadership training, master classes, and networking. The TDEA convention is scheduled for Jan. 9-12 in Houston.

The nine Dallas ISD dancers selected to participate are:

  • Irma Berlanga, Spruce High School
  • Tyianah Duren-Clifton, Molina High School
  • Carlos Garcia, Thomas Jefferson High School
  • Carolina Gonzalez, North Dallas High School
  • Jacqueline Hernandez, Sunset High School
  • Alize Rangel, Adamson High School
  • Daisy Sosa – Bryan Adams High School
  • Kyre Walker, Skyline High School
  • Anna Weis, Woodrow Wilson High School

Additionally, the TDEA will give each student $10,000 in scholarships toward their higher education.


District campuses celebrate new programs, facility upgrades this year

Several Dallas ISD schools have new focuses this year, from becoming Montessori or Personalized Learning schools to seeing their existing choice school expand physically to accommodate a growing enrollment and additional activities. See a rundown below:

• Two years after Solar Preparatory School for Girls opened at the former James B. Bonham Elementary School, staff and students celebrated the completion of a 44,000-square-foot addition on Oct. 5. Read the story here.

 

 

 

 

 

• On Monday, Oct. 15, students, staff, and district and community leaders celebrated the official transition of Onesimo Hernandez Elementary School to the Montessori Academy at Onesimo Hernandez. At the beginning of this school year, the campus opened by serving students in pre-K and kindergarten using the Montessori Method of instruction. Read the story here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

• The oldest Dallas ISD facility to be continuously used as a school celebrated its 21st-century outlook with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Wednesday, Oct. 17. Sam Houston Public School opened in 1909 and most recently was a traditional elementary school. This year, it has changed to Personalized Learning Preparatory at Sam Houston, continuing to serve elementary grades. Read the story here.

• Students, parents, staff and district officials dedicated the new Solar Preparatory for Boys at John F. Kennedy Learning Center on Tuesday, Oct. 23. Read the story here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ignite Middle School, a new personalized learning school at the former J.W. Ray Learning Center, was officially dedicated on Oct. 9.

 


Future looks bright for students at new Solar Preparatory for Boys









Students, parents, staff and district officials dedicated the new Solar Preparatory for Boys at John F. Kennedy Learning Center on Tuesday, Oct. 23.

This year brings a new program to the school, which transforms the campus from a comprehensive, coed elementary school to an all-male elementary that incorporates elements of leadership training into the curriculum. Much like its sister school, Solar Preparatory for Girls, which opened in 2016, the school’s open enrollment is balanced to provide ethnic and socioeconomic diversity. Also like the girls school, Solar Prep for Boys has opened with grades pre-K through second.

Principal Adriana Gonzalez thanked those who had helped launch the school, including Solar Prep for Girls Principal Nancy Bernardino and her staff.

District 8 Trustee Miguel Solis pointed to President  John F. Kennedy, for whom the campus is originally named, to illustrate one of the main goals of Solar Prep for Boys.

In a 1963 speech at Rice University, President Kennedy said it was crucial for America to send a man to the moon before the end of that decade.

“He had the vision to think something boldly,” Solis said. “That would be dangerous, that would be filled with challenges, was not promised. But he thought that through innovation, grit and determination, despite those challenges, that the moonshot, and landing some on the moon, was possible.”

Likewise, a school like Solar Prep for Boys can work to combat segregation, especially by socioeconomic and racial factors.

“This campus brings students from all walks of life into a nurturing environment that allows kids to see themselves for who they are: kids,” Solis said. They won’t see their differences, he said, and represents the district’s “moonshot.”

The challenges will be great, he said. “But we will overcome them, we will overcome them together. And our boys, these future leaders, will be shining examples of what Dallas can be and what Dallas should be.”

Brian Lusk, Dallas ISD Chief of Strategic Initiatives, said the vision started with Principal Gonzalez, and that she did excellent work at her previous campus, L.K. Hall Elementary School. He said district officials know the single-gender leadership model works; notably he talked about his part in transitioning Fred F. Florence Middle School into a Male Leadership Academy.

Assistant Principal Derek Thomas talked about how the school will provide a solid foundation to create leaders as the students grow and continue to learn.


Billy Earl Dade’s daughter inspires students at school named after father

The daughter of Billy Earl Dade encouraged students at her father’s namesake middle school to thrive at a special pinning ceremony.

Billie Sanford Dade hosted an award pinning ceremony at Dade Middle School to celebrate the many students demonstrating excellence at the school. Dade traveled from Atlanta to Dallas for the ceremony. Dade said the pinning ceremony was just the start of a partnership to support students at the school.

“My father was a person who believed that everyone should have a good education, regardless of where they live,” Dade said. “I know if my father were alive, he’d be deeply involved with this school. I decided I needed to do something for this school so the students know there are many people standing behind them to help them thrive.”

Billy Earl Dade was a legendary education figure who served as a principal at multiple Dallas ISD campuses, including Fredrick Douglass, Paul Dunbar, and C.F. Carr elementary schools.

Tom Hayden of Dallas ISD’s Strategic Initiatives and External Relations thanked Dade for traveling to Dallas for the powerful ceremony.

“It’s incredible that the outstanding legacy of exceptional educational standards continues on in the lives of Dr. Dade’s daughter,” he said.


‘Universo’ interviene para que autora de libro galardonado visite Marcus Elementary School

“When the universe talks, you should listen!” (Cuando el universo habla, debes escucharlo)

Esta frase es uno de los temas del libro ganador del Premio Newbery de este año, “Hello Universe”, de Erin Entrada Kelly. Rebecca McKee, bibliotecaria de Herbert Marcus Elementary School, siguió el consejo de la historia, y ahora algunos estudiantes afortunados de quinto grado en Marcus tendrán la oportunidad de conocer en persona a la autora.

“Cuando leí ‘Hello Universe’ durante el verano, inmediatamente me enamoré de Valencia, uno de los personajes de la historia, el cual es sordo”, dijo McKee. “Luego, obtuve el trabajo en la biblioteca en Marcus y me di cuenta que muchos de los estudiantes con los que conviviría están en el programa de educación para estudiantes sordos. Por ello, seleccionar esta historia para leer en voz alta fue algo natural. Además, ¡es una selección de Texas Bluebonnet este año!”.

McKee habló con los maestros de 5º grado para que les leyeran a los estudiantes en la biblioteca algunas veces por semana, lo cual les pareció una idea fantástica. Alisa Kline dijo que los estudiantes estaban extremadamente atentos durante la lectura.

“Todos nuestros estudiantes pudieron identificarse con al menos uno de los personajes, especialmente nuestros estudiantes sordos y con problemas de audición”, dijo McKee.

Al terminar la historia, McKee publicó una foto del grupo en Twitter y etiquetó a la autora. No solo respondió Kelly, sino que el universo intervino.

Lindsay Marchant, bibliotecaria de Good Shepherd Episcopal School, vio la respuesta de Kelly en Twitter e inmediatamente se comunicó con McKee con mejores noticias. Good Shepherd, escuela anteriormente asociada con Marcus, había reservado previamente a la Sra. Kelly para una visita en noviembre. Marchant, amablemente, decidió que los niños de Marcus deberían ser parte de este evento, y Kelly estuvo de acuerdo.

Por lo que, el próximo mes, los estudiantes que escucharon esta historia tendrán una oportunidad excepcional de tener una charla exclusiva con la autora. Durante este encuentro, seguramente hablarán sobre otro tema del cuento: “¡No hay nada mejor que las coincidencias!”.


Votación anticipada empieza el 22 de octubre para Elección de Ratificación de Impuestos

El 6 de noviembre, se les presentará a los electores del condado de Dallas para su consideración, la Elección de Ratificación de Impuestos (TRE) para el Dallas ISD.

Una Elección de Ratificación de Impuestos (TRE) es una elección especial que es convocada por la Junta Escolar de un distrito en la que se les pide a los votantes aprobar un aumento en la tasa de impuestos de mantenimiento y operaciones (M&O). Estos impuestos se utilizan para cubrir los costos diarios de operación. Desde 2008, el Dallas ISD ha mantenido una tasa tributaria para M&O de $1.04. Para poder superar dicha tasa se requiere la aprobación de los votantes. Si los electores votan a favor, la tasa para M&O aumentaría al limite de $1.17 permitido por el estado. Para mayor información sobre la elección TRE, haga clic aquí.

El periodo de votación anticipada comenzó el lunes, 22 de octubre, y termina el viernes, 3 de noviembre. Los votantes inscritos en el condado de Dallas pueden ejercer su derecho al voto en cualquier centro de votación en el condado. El día de la elección es el martes, 6 de noviembre. Para más información, haga clic aquí.


Seis escuelas de Dallas ISD reciben calificación de 99 en las últimas calificaciones de la TEA

Seis escuelas de Dallas ISD están entre las 11 que obtuvieron un 99 en las calificaciones de la Agencia de Educación de Texas en 2018.

Las escuelas son: • William B. Travis Academy/Vanguard for the Academically Talented and Gifted (grados 4-5) • School for the Talented and Gifted • School of Science and Engineering • Trinidad “Trini” Garza Early College High School • Irma Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School (grados 6-8) • Travis Academy/Vanguard (grados 6-8).

Otras escuelas en el distrito, que en general obtuvo una “B” (81), también lograron buenos resultados – incluyendo calificaciones en los altos 90. Para ver la clasificación por escuela haga clic aquí. Asimismo, el Dallas Business Journal publicó un artículo donde desglosa las mejores escuelas en la región.


Seis escuelas de Dallas ISD reciben calificación de 99 en las últimas calificaciones de la TEA

Seis escuelas de Dallas ISD están entre las 11 que obtuvieron un 99 en las calificaciones de la Agencia de Educación de Texas en 2018.

Las escuelas son: • William B. Travis Academy/Vanguard for the Academically Talented and Gifted (grados 4-5) • School for the Talented and Gifted • School of Science and Engineering • Trinidad “Trini” Garza Early College High School • Irma Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School (grados 6-8) • Travis Academy/Vanguard (grados 6-8).

Otras escuelas en el distrito, que en general obtuvo una “B” (81), también lograron buenos resultados – incluyendo calificaciones en los altos 90. Para ver la clasificación por escuela haga clic aquí. Asimismo, el Dallas Business Journal publicó un artículo donde desglosa las mejores escuelas en la región.


Montessori Academy en Onésimo Hernández celebra nuevo enfoque

El lunes, 15 de octubre, estudiantes, personal y líderes del distrito y la comunidad celebraron el cambio oficial de Onésimo Hernández Elementary School a Montessori Academy en Onésimo Hernández. El plantel inició el año escolar utilizando el método de instrucción Montessori en las clases de prekínder y kínder.

A menudo, los estudiantes en las escuelas Montessori son asignados a clases compuestas de varias edades. Los estudiantes seleccionan las actividades que quieren realizar de varias disponibles, y el aprendizaje se logra por medio del descubrimiento en lugar de la instrucción directa. El método Montessori, desarrollado hace más de cien años, es una de las primeras formas del aprendizaje personalizado.

“Al iniciar el año escolar, es obvio que están ocurriendo muchas cosas fabulosas”, dijo Brian Lusk, jefe de Iniciativas Estratégicas. “En las clases esta mañana, observé que las personas verdaderamente han adoptado el método”.

Dijo que padres e integrantes de la comunidad necesitan mantenerse involucrados. “Es un acto de fe permitir a nuestros hijos ser un poco más independientes, pero es lo correcto”.

Miguel Solís, representante del Distrito 8 en la Junta Escolar, agradeció a la comunidad por permanecer fiel al distrito durante la transición. “Sé que para muchos no fue una transición sencilla”, dijo Solís. “Quizás hubo preguntas sobre lo que estábamos haciendo en esta escuela y lo que significa ‘Montessori’ para los niños que asistirían”.

También, habló sobre el hecho de que Onésimo Hernández Elementary School salió de la lista de las escuelas con necesidad de mejorar por medio del esfuerzo y recursos adicionales proporcionados por el programa de Accelerating Campus Excellence (ACE). “Por esas razones, Hernández no solo salió de dicha lista”, dijo Solís, “también se hizo un trabajo fenomenal para lograr que los estudiantes estuvieran al nivel que tenian que estar al final del año escolar.”

Stephanie Hernández, hija del fallecido Dr. Onésimo Hernández, habló sobre las primeras experiencias en la formación de su padre. Cuando empezó a asistir a Maple Lawn Elementary School, en ese entonces una escuela solo para anglos, un maestro se interesó en él y se preocupó por su progreso académico. Él llego a ser el primer méxico-americano egresado de la escuela de medicina de UT Southwestern y trabajó para abrirles las puertas a los demás.

La Dra. Samarpita Sengupta, madre de un estudiante, dijo que fue un acto de fe para los padres registrar a sus hijos en el programa nuevo en Hernández, pero existía precedente en el distrito.

“El éxito de los tres planteles Montessori establecidos hizo que la decisión fuera menos difícil”, dijo.

Los recursos proporcionados a la escuela, desde remodelaciones a las instalaciones hasta materiales de aprendizaje y muebles nuevos en cada salón, han mostrado el compromiso al programa Montessori.

Dijo que, a nivel personal, ella quería que su hijo asistiera a una escuela donde se sintiera cómodo – que hubiera otros estudiantes y maestros que se parecieran a él. “La diversidad en esta escuela entre los maestros, padres y estudiantes será su mejor recurso”, dijo Sengupta.

La meta, dijo ella, es que todos colaboremos a lograr que la escuela logré su máximo potencial y que los estudiantes salgan de Hernández dotados académicamente, pero también sean seres amables, generosos, y empáticos que promulguen un cambio positivo en el mundo.


Montessori Academy en Onésimo Hernández celebra nuevo enfoque

El lunes, 15 de octubre, estudiantes, personal y líderes del distrito y la comunidad celebraron el cambio oficial de Onésimo Hernández Elementary School a Montessori Academy en Onésimo Hernández. El plantel inició el año escolar utilizando el método de instrucción Montessori en las clases de prekínder y kínder.

A menudo, los estudiantes en las escuelas Montessori son asignados a clases compuestas de varias edades. Los estudiantes seleccionan las actividades que quieren realizar de varias disponibles, y el aprendizaje se logra por medio del descubrimiento en lugar de la instrucción directa. El método Montessori, desarrollado hace más de cien años, es una de las primeras formas del aprendizaje personalizado.

“Al iniciar el año escolar, es obvio que están ocurriendo muchas cosas fabulosas”, dijo Brian Lusk, jefe de Iniciativas Estratégicas. “En las clases esta mañana, observé que las personas verdaderamente han adoptado el método”.

Dijo que padres e integrantes de la comunidad necesitan mantenerse involucrados. “Es un acto de fe permitir a nuestros hijos ser un poco más independientes, pero es lo correcto”.

Miguel Solís, representante del Distrito 8 en la Junta Escolar, agradeció a la comunidad por permanecer fiel al distrito durante la transición. “Sé que para muchos no fue una transición sencilla”, dijo Solís. “Quizás hubo preguntas sobre lo que estábamos haciendo en esta escuela y lo que significa ‘Montessori’ para los niños que asistirían”.

También, habló sobre el hecho de que Onésimo Hernández Elementary School salió de la lista de las escuelas con necesidad de mejorar por medio del esfuerzo y recursos adicionales proporcionados por el programa de Accelerating Campus Excellence (ACE). “Por esas razones, Hernández no solo salió de dicha lista”, dijo Solís, “también se hizo un trabajo fenomenal para lograr que los estudiantes estuvieran al nivel que tenian que estar al final del año escolar.”

Stephanie Hernández, hija del fallecido Dr. Onésimo Hernández, habló sobre las primeras experiencias en la formación de su padre. Cuando empezó a asistir a Maple Lawn Elementary School, en ese entonces una escuela solo para anglos, un maestro se interesó en él y se preocupó por su progreso académico. Él llego a ser el primer méxico-americano egresado de la escuela de medicina de UT Southwestern y trabajó para abrirles las puertas a los demás.

La Dra. Samarpita Sengupta, madre de un estudiante, dijo que fue un acto de fe para los padres registrar a sus hijos en el programa nuevo en Hernández, pero existía precedente en el distrito.

“El éxito de los tres planteles Montessori establecidos hizo que la decisión fuera menos difícil”, dijo.

Los recursos proporcionados a la escuela, desde remodelaciones a las instalaciones hasta materiales de aprendizaje y muebles nuevos en cada salón, han mostrado el compromiso al programa Montessori.

Dijo que, a nivel personal, ella quería que su hijo asistiera a una escuela donde se sintiera cómodo – que hubiera otros estudiantes y maestros que se parecieran a él. “La diversidad en esta escuela entre los maestros, padres y estudiantes será su mejor recurso”, dijo Sengupta.

La meta, dijo ella, es que todos colaboremos a lograr que la escuela logré su máximo potencial y que los estudiantes salgan de Hernández dotados académicamente, pero también sean seres amables, generosos, y empáticos que promulguen un cambio positivo en el mundo.


Schools highlight drug-prevention efforts during Red Ribbon Week

Red Ribbon Week is officially Oct. 23-31 this year, which focuses on drug prevention through a variety of activities.

Dallas ISD schools across the district often participate with themed days that tie in with an anti-drug message. Campuses may share photos and information about their activities via email to thehub@dallasisd.org or by filling out this form.

District schools may also share social media posts by tagging us with @dallasschools on Twitter, @dallasisd on Instagram or @DallasISD on Facebook.

The 2018 theme is “Life Is Your Journey. Travel Drug Free,” which was created by Ohio middle school student Taeya Moore. In addition to activities during the week, students are asked to sign the pledge that they will stay drug-free.

Since 1985, Red Ribbon Week has been a dedicated time to raise awareness of the killing and destruction caused by drugs. The effort was sparked by the murder of DEA Agent Enrique Camarena, after which parents and youth across the country began wearing red ribbons to show their commitment for drug prevention.

The annual event is coordinated by the National Family Partnership. Find information and resources here.


Early voting starts Oct. 22 for Tax Ratification Election

Dallas County voters will consider a Tax Ratification Election (TRE) for Dallas ISD on the Nov. 6 ballot.

A TRE is a special election called by a school district’s board of trustees that asks voters to approve an increase in its maintenance and operating (M&O) tax rate. M&O taxes cover the day-to-day cost of school district operations. Since 2008, Dallas ISD has maintained an M&O tax rate of $1.04. The approval of voters is required for the district to exceed the $1.04 rate. If approved, the tax ratification election would increase the M&O tax rate to the state cap of $1.17.

Learn more about the TRE here.

Early voting started on Monday, Oct. 22, and runs through Friday, Nov. 3. Voters registered in Dallas County may vote at any early polling site in the county.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 6. Find voting information here.


‘Universe’ intervenes to send award-winning author to Marcus Elementary

“When the universe talks, you should listen!”

This statement is one of the themes from this year’s Newbery Award winning book, “Hello Universe,” by Erin Entrada Kelly. Rebecca McKee, librarian at Herbert Marcus Elementary School, followed the story’s advice, and now some lucky fifth-grade students at Marcus will have the chance for some personal face-to-face time with the author.

“When I read ‘Hello Universe’ over the summer, I immediately fell in love with Valencia, one of the characters in the story who is deaf,” Kelly said. “Then, I landed the library job at Marcus and learned that many of the students I would be serving are in the deaf-education program. So, selecting this story as a read-aloud was a natural fit. Plus, it’s a Texas Bluebonnet selection this year!” 

Kelly approached the teachers of 5G about coming in a few times per week to read the story, and they were happy to oblige. Alisa Kline said that students were extremely engaged during the reading.

“All of our students were able to relate with at least one of the characters, especially our deaf and hard-of-hearing students,” Kelly said. 

Upon finishing the story,  McKee posted a picture of the group on Twitter and tagged the author. Not only did Kelly reply, but the universe intervened further.

Lindsay Marchant, librarian at Good Shepherd Episcopal School,  saw  Kelly’s reply Tweet and immediately contacted  McKee with some further good news. Good Shepherd, a previous partner school with Marcus, had previously booked Ms. Kelly for an author visit in November.  Marchant graciously decided that the kids at Marcus should share in this event, and Kelly agreed.

So, next month the students who heard this story will have a rare opportunity to have an intimate discussion with the Newbery author that created it.  At that time, they will surely discuss another theme from the tale: “There are no such things as coincidences!”


Abre las puertas la nueva escuela Personalized Learning Preparatory at Sam Houston












El miércoles, 17 de octubre, se llevó a cabo una ceremonia en el edificio más antiguo de Dallas ISD, que se ha utilizado continuamente como plantel escolar, para celebrar su reapertura como escuela con un nuevo modelo educativo.

Sam Houston Public School abrió sus puertas en 1909, y hasta hace poco aún funcionaba como una escuela primaria tradicional. Este año, su nombre cambió a Personalized Learning Preparatory at Sam Houston, aunque sigue sirviendo los mismos grados de primaria. El modelo de enseñanza también cambio. Ahora el aprendizaje es personalizado; los estudiantes tienen en poder de explorar y dirigir sus propios estudios dentro de los parámetros del currículo.

Durante el evento, los estudiantes dieron la bienvenida, lideraron el juramento a la bandera de Estados Unidos y de Texas, y compartieron lo que el aprendizaje significa para ellos. Raymie Venable, directora de la escuela, agradeció a los invitados especiales y al Departamento de Aprendizaje Personalizado por su apoyo.

“El país entero está al tanto de lo que sucede en esta escuela porque están haciendo algo único”, dijo Miguel Solís, representante del Distrito 8. “Atrás quedaron los días cuando era suficiente enseñar un currículo tradicional de cuatro por cuatro. Ahora creemos, especialmente en esta escuela, que cada estudiante merece la oportunidad de obtener una educación especifica que se ajuste a su manera de aprender para asegurar que el sueño americano se pueda hacer realidad”.

Les dijo a los estudiantes, “no sientan presión”, aunque todos quieren ver las excelentes cosas que lograran en la escuela. “Por lo tanto, hoy que cortamos la cinta, les estamos diciendo básicamente a todos ustedes: es un nuevo comienzo, y ustedes nos liderarán hacia el futuro”.

Brian Lusk, jefe del Departamento de Iniciativas Estratégicas, dijo que al entrar a una escuela uno puede ver señales que nos indican que tipo de lugar es. Los estudiantes con los que conversó mostraron seguridad en si mismos, y además agregó, que el tipo de comunidad que se esta creando en la escuela se extenderá hacia afuera del plantel.

“Hoy, al entrar al edificio, vi salones de clases donde los estudiantes trabajaban uno a uno con tecnología y algunos otros trabajaban con el maestro”, dijo Lusk. “Eso es exactamente lo que debe ser un modelo de aprendizaje personalizado – permitirles a los estudiantes autonomía para determinar cómo aprender.”

Indicó que, en un principio, el plan era implementar este modelo en kínder hasta segundo grado, pero se está implementó hasta el quinto grado. “Eso es algo que agradezco también”.

Angie Gaylord, jefa adjunto del Departamento de Transformación e Innovación, compartió lo que aprendió de tres estudiantes de Sam Houston sobre su experiencia con el aprendizaje personalizado.

Los tres mencionaron el enfoque que se le da a sus necesidades, a su propio ritmo de aprendizaje y sus deseos al momento de decidir qué estudiar.

“A veces cambiar el modelo o transforman una escuela no es fácil”, dijo Gaylord. “Pero lo que vamos a hacer aquí será extraordinario. Los estudiantes serán responsables de su aprendizaje, tendrán voz y libertad para elegir”.


Día de las Profesiones da a los estudiantes de South Oak Cliff un vistazo al futuro 






El 1er Día de las Profesiones Dr. Willie Fred Johnson Jr. en South Oak Cliff High School (SOC) fue especial por dos razones.

La primera razón es que el evento fue el primero de su clase nombrado por el director actual de SOC. La segunda es que el evento dio a los estudiantes la oportunidad de ver como lucirá SOC después de las renovaciones al edificio. Desde enero, los estudiantes han acudido a las instalaciones de Village Fair de Dallas ISD mientras se completa el trabajo de remodelación. Representantes de Kai Texas, la firma arquitectónica encargada de proyecto de South Oak Cliff High School estuvieron presentes el Día de las Profesiones. Se mostró un vídeo que ofreció una idea de lo diferente y mejor que será la escuela después de la remodelación y ampliación. El proyecto está financiado por el Programa de bonos del 2015.

Los estudiantes pudieron tocar muestras de los materiales que serán usados para las paredes y pisos y los representantes compartieron la importancia de la carrera de arquitectura.

En el evento del 16 de octubre, los estudiantes pudieron consultar con representantes de colegios técnicos y comunitarios para saber cómo solicitar admisión y ayuda financiera. También, el puesto de Dallas County Promise compartió información sobre la iniciativa de la Fundación del Distrito de Colegios Comunitarios del Condado de Dallas que permite a egresados de las preparatorias del área estudiar en colegios locales por dos años sin costo y con recursos adicionales para incrementar su éxito.

Otros participantes incluyeron The Art Institutes, Aviation Institute of Maintenance, los colegios comunitarios Cedar Valley, El Centro, y Richland, además de The Ogle School y Texas Barber College.

El Día de las Profesiones fue patrocinado por la sede DML654 de Logia Masónica.


Six schools in Dallas ISD receive grade of 99 in latest TEA ratings

Six Dallas ISD schools were among only 11 that earned a grade of 99 from the Texas Education Agency in its 2018 ratings.

They are:
• William B. Travis Academy/Vanguard for the Academically Talented and Gifted (grades 4-5)
• School for the Talented and Gifted
• School of Science and Engineering
• Trinidad “Trini” Garza Early College High School
• Irma Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School (grades 6-8)
• Travis Academy/Vanguard (grades 6-8).

Other campuses in the district, which overall earned a grade of B (81), also fared well – including many high A’s. Find rankings by school here.

The Dallas Business Journal has an article that breaks down the top schools in the region here.


Families invited to experience STEM Environmental Education Center

Parents, students and community members are invited to join the STEM Environmental Education Center to learn more about the programs and resources available for students and teachers at the center.

The open house is set for 10 a.m.- 2p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20. The center is located at 1600 Bowers Road in Seagoville. The center’s mission is to help diverse learners develop an awareness, appreciation, and concern for the environment, and as citizens use 21st century knowledge and skills to make informed, responsible decisions, solve current environmental problems, and prevent new ones.